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View Full Version : Elbow-Friendly Racquet?


joebedford
01-03-2005, 04:31 PM
My current stick is a Babolat Pure Control, purchased because, um, I wanted more control. :-) My elbow started bothering me early this season. I switched to natural gut string. It didn't help. I decreased my string tension to the lowest part of the recommended range. It didn't help. I laid off for a month. It didn't help.

The next logical thing to try, it seems to me, is a different racquet. In your opinion, which ones should I be looking at, and why?

Tenny
01-03-2005, 04:45 PM
POG OS (This is very good), Pro kennex 5G or 7G (haven't tried myself).
Prostaff6.0 95 is very comfortable with its famous buttery feel.
I heard that Volkl V1 classic is quite good among stiff racquets. Wish this helps!

T.

Craig Sheppard
01-03-2005, 04:47 PM
You're also forgetting a key element to elbow pain: your technique. You should have your technique reviewed by a USPTA certified instructor in order to learn if there is anything inherently wrong with your mechanics that will lead to your elbow pain.

As far as comfortable racquets, there are quite a few available. Most Volkls and Fischers are relatively comfortable, as well as the Pro Kennex Kinetic series. Probably the most popular frame for those with elbow pain has been the Pro Kennex Kinetic 5G. It seems to be a very comfortable racquet. Also, if you give us more info on the type of game you play we might be able to give you more personalized recommendations.

First and foremost though, I would suggest you have a pro evaluate your mechanics to rule out any problems there. Even the most comfortable racquet won't overcome bad mechanics. Sorry I'm not trying to be harsh about your game, just covering all the bases since you seem to have tried different things already.

Craig

Progressive10s
01-04-2005, 03:31 PM
After coaching a high school girl tennis team in the spring of 2002, I realized that my elbow was starting to hurt. I hadn't played consistently in 10 years, and I picked up a fairly stiff frame (Prince Precision Equipe). It certainly wasn't my strokes because a couple of pros I worked with said that my strokes were textbook. What contributed to my condition was age, conditioning, and poor choice in equipment. Having grown up in the 70s, I was used to wood, steel, and aluminum racquets that could plow through balls and flexible gut strings. Technology has made strides--synthetic strings are much better, but the racquets lack feel. I am still rehabilitating my tennis elbow after it flared up this spring. My job and lifting didn't help either. I believe that conditioning and equipment play an important part as well.

jayserinos99
01-04-2005, 03:50 PM
I'll chime in with the Volkl recommendation as well. One racquet that didn't give me much pain was the Tour 10 MP. The Cat V1 was a comfortable stick as well.

Ronaldo
01-04-2005, 07:04 PM
Any racquet with an RDC under 60 should be a start. Suppose that limits you to the 200G, PK racquets, and the odd Wilsons like the ROK or others. Cold find some old Head Tour racquets but NEW?

louis netman
01-04-2005, 09:18 PM
thanx for your suggestions, but although the kinetic thing is cool, I don't think PK makes a stick with an RDC below 60...

Brent Pederson
01-04-2005, 09:25 PM
Head radical os is about 58 I believe, and is very comfortable. MP is also nice and flexy. Volkl c10 is also about as comfortable as it gets.

bcaz
01-04-2005, 09:41 PM
Netman, yes they do ... take a look at the Heritage Type R, perhaps the most flexible stick on the market today.

iloveradical
01-04-2005, 10:33 PM
I recommend 6.0 95. IMHO, stiffness is not top priority with regard to arm problems. More important in your case is swing weight, I think. What kind of PC are you using? I guess that woud be PC Team + or Team + MP whose swing weights (332g and 338g) are relatively high.

It is a well-known hypothesis that heavier racquets cause less elbow problems when other conditions (i.e., stiffness) are equal. But the hypothesis can be true only concerning the vibrations or shocks caused by 'hitting' a ball. Namely, heavy racquets can be arm friendly by reducing shocks coming from flying balls.

However, we have to consider another problem by swinging hard with heavy sticks. Imagine that you're just swinging without hitting balls. Then, which racquet is arm-friendly; heavy one or light one? The answer is definately 'light' one. Just swing hard ten times with a baseball bat as if it is a tennis racquet, first with normal grip, and next with up-side-down grip. Your arm'll feel a phenomenal difference.

Then, ignoring stiffness, you can see why sticks like 6.0 95 is arm friendly; even though it's stiffness(67) is relatively high, net weight (346g) is heavy enough to reduce shocks from hitting balls and swing weight (318g) is light enough not to cause stress from swinging hard.

andfor
01-05-2005, 06:46 AM
Your technique may be a very important key. Another of my favorite suggestions when this comes up is to check your grip size. It may seem obvious but sometimes is overlooked. I know it was by me at one time. This link is what cleared up my elbow problems.
http://www.tennis-warehouse.com/LC/Gripsize/Gripsize.html

mctennis
01-05-2005, 07:23 AM
I think either a Volkl V1 Classic or a PK 5G is your answer. Too many complaints of elbow/wrist pain from the Babolat racquets. I know the flex ratings have a lot to do with the pain problems BUT also if you have a racquet that has good dampening abilities ( both Volkl and the kenetic series PK have that) it takes a lot of the vobration away. Volkl has a great handle system and the kenetic series PK uses a racquet head dampening system to accomplish that. No other racquet company has that besides those two. I don't believe strings alone can accomplish what these eto racquet companies have done. I hope this helps.

Mj
01-05-2005, 07:31 AM
yonex ti-50: flexible, head light and good swing weight.

Ronaldo
01-05-2005, 08:37 AM
Bcaz, the Heritage series is what I meant, name escaped me.

Jerry Seinfeld
01-05-2005, 09:03 AM
Proportional stringing has been known to reduce the shock, especially on off-center hits. Restringing frequently, using a soft string (multi) or gut with this method will often help. These are additional options you might consider.

BLiND
01-05-2005, 10:18 AM
I have to say the Head LM Radical and Prestige are elbow friendly

volleyman
01-05-2005, 01:19 PM
I have found the PK Core 1 #10 to a very comfortable racquet for my tender elbow.

Tenny
01-06-2005, 02:16 PM
I think either a Volkl V1 Classic or a PK 5G is your answer. Too many complaints of elbow/wrist pain from the Babolat racquets. I know the flex ratings have a lot to do with the pain problems BUT also if you have a racquet that has good dampening abilities ( both Volkl and the kenetic series PK have that) it takes a lot of the vobration away. Volkl has a great handle system and the kenetic series PK uses a racquet head dampening system to accomplish that. No other racquet company has that besides those two. I don't believe strings alone can accomplish what these eto racquet companies have done. I hope this helps.

V1 classic's RDC is quite high (~70) but many think it's arm friendly. Is it stiff but somehow arm friendly or doesn't the number do the justice? Can someone briefly compare C10 pro and V1 (Beside the fact that former is more player's and heavy and latter is tweener's. I got interested in Volkl sticks)

joebedford
01-11-2005, 05:17 PM
Thanks for all the great advice guys. I'm goin' shoppin'! And anyone who is looking for a Babolat PC or two, be watching on ****.

As to my technique, yes, I'm sure it sucks. But guys, I'm 37--it ain't changin' much at this point. :-}

apothnyc
01-11-2005, 09:11 PM
Pro Kennex is the way to go....I have a very sensitive elbow and have found the Kinetic series (5g & 7g) to be arm savers. I am currently using the Heritage series Type R which is the most flexible racquet I have used in many years...and with the right string setup could be "the one"....."the bomb"..."the holy grail".

Steve Huff
01-12-2005, 12:05 PM
I'd put the ProKennex 5g at the top of my list. It's probably the easiest racket on the arm as any made today. The Type R is proably good too, though I haven't tried this one. Other rackets that I've hit with that were easy on the arm: Volkl Catapult V1 MP, Fischer VT 98 (now the Pro 1), Yonex RDti50. The Volkl played well from the baseline, but I found it hard to control volleys. The Fischer was pretty nice. It was harder to hit topspin with though. The Yonex just felt heavier, plus I one of the demos was cracked at 12 o'clock, as was another one a friend had. I didn't want a racket that seemed that fragile. The 5g was a really nice, overall racket, and very comfortable.