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ratm355
03-28-2008, 08:13 PM
I have had previous shoulder and wrist injuries that just continuously plague me while playing tennis. I tend to injure my shoulder most when hitting high forehands and the first few serves of the day. Here are some of the racquets I have tried with varying success: Prince Tour Diablo Midplus, Dunlop 300G OS, Prince Ozone Tour Midplus, Boris Becker 11 Light, Volkl DNX 6 Attiva, Volkl C10 Pro, Wilson n3, Wilson n5 Force Midplus, Head Protector Midplus, and I'm probably forgetting some. I like to play with racquets with a midplus headsize, open string pattern, head-light balance, flexible frame, control-oriented, and a long enough handle for a 2-handed backhand. However, at this point my main concern is a racquet with the most comfort possible. I want to be completely disconnected from the ball with no feel at all. I know it'll be hard to play tennis like that, but that's pretty much my only option at this point it seems. So far, the Wilson n3 is the only racquet that I have not had arm problems with. I also didn't play much with the Head Protector, and it might've fit the bill as well. The n3 and the Head Protector had too much power for me, but I'll play with those if I don't have any better options. My favorite racket performance-wise is the Prince Ozone Tour Midplus. My current racket is the n5 Force Midplus with added weight in the handle. It has fixed my wrist problems, but not my shoulder problems. It also has a little too much power for me. Are any of the old Triads extremely comfortable? I'll probably try to demo a Fischer racquet with the GDS system and the new Wilson k5 midplus and OS. Any suggestions for racquets are greatly appreciated. Thanks!

NLBwell
03-28-2008, 08:53 PM
Shoulder and wrist - there is a technique problem.
That being said, normally a heavy flexible racket would be best (PT280, Redondo, or maybe Ki5PSe). However, if you are torquing your wrist improperly, a heavier racket may make it worse by adding more weight to throw around. Seems like that might be the case since the lightweight n3 and n5 seem to help. My solution would be to fix your strokes.

Shashwat
03-28-2008, 08:57 PM
N-blade
K-blade

But they are not open string patterns.

the-robz
03-28-2008, 09:02 PM
o3 rackets + soft multi.

ratm355
03-28-2008, 10:47 PM
like I said, it's from previous injuries. Just the vibrations hurt my wrist in almost any position....It was fractured several years ago (not from tennis obviously) and I never saw the doctor until a couple years after it happened and it didn't heal back the right way I guess. With the shoulder, I heard it pop one time when I hit a serve without warming up first in the cold several years back (you're right, I didn't have the greatest technique back then) and I couldn't lift my arm laterally from my side for a few days after that....yeah, I know I should've seen a doctor or maybe still should. With my wrist, extra weight doesn't seem to bother it....it's just the vibrations. I'm not sure which would be better for the shoulder, less or more weight because I'm not sure if a heavier swingweight will make it worse or not. It seems like with the n3 and n5 though, is that it's the triad construction and the foam in the head that helps. I wish they'd put the triad construction on some players rackets even though nobody would use them but me :). Yeah, I've been using some comfortable strings too and that definitely helps. I'll take a look at the rackets you guys suggested. Thanks for the input.

furyoku_tennis
03-28-2008, 10:51 PM
Yonex RQiS 1 Tour
Pro Kennex Redondo MP

OrangeOne
03-28-2008, 10:53 PM
My Yonex RDX 500 MidPlus was (almst frustratingly) flexible - very very comfortable frame. Might be worth a hit if you can find one, but that said, the frames after it in the range have been stiffer, my current 002 Tour feels, at least, much stiffer (and about a kilo heavier :)).

I take it people have suggested gut strings? I've never played with them ($80 a set here in Aus), but yeah....

ratm355
03-28-2008, 11:05 PM
If I was rich, maybe I'd use gut....but, well I'm not. I like a comfortable, thin string that holds its tension well and I'm guessing I'll go with Tecnifibre Multifeel or Gamma Professional. I haven't played with the Multifeel strings yet, but I bought a couple to try out. The Babolat RVS vibration dampener helps a little too. I know the Wilson nfury is supposed to be real flexible too, but I figured it didn't have enough weight to it to be extremely comfortable. I noticed there is a difference between the nfury and nfury two. The nfury two is not quite as flexible and they added nfoam in the head. Some other websites show the differences in their specs.

LanEvo
03-28-2008, 11:21 PM
pro kennex 5g

diredesire
03-28-2008, 11:41 PM
pro kennex 5g

Ditto, POG OS is also a pretty comfortable frame, i'd try a gut hybrid @ approx the same price as a higher end multi and call it a day. Doesn't get much better than that.

kanjii
03-29-2008, 09:04 AM
That exist? Rossi F200.
That's currently out there? I play with the MG Extreme Pro.

ratm355
03-29-2008, 11:06 AM
What about the Fox ATP Mid Wood? I know it wouldn't have much power and a real small sweet spot....but it looks like it'd be pretty comfortable.

http://www.tennis-warehouse.com/descpageRCBOS-ATPFOX.html



Would a Prince O3 Tour Midplus be any more comfortable than a Prince Ozone Tour Midplus? I'm guessing they'd be pretty much the same....but I figured I'd ask.

Lendl
03-29-2008, 11:24 AM
APDC is about as comfortable as you can get in my opinion. Very soft feel and just swings nice.

roddick89
03-29-2008, 11:55 AM
I agree with Lendl, APDC is very nice, or why not invest in a thick gauge natural gut?

kungfusmkim
03-29-2008, 11:59 AM
a bad minton racquetwill do the trick

ratm355
03-29-2008, 07:35 PM
Yeah, I suppose I'll try one set of gut...maybe even on a badminton racket :)

I'll demo Nadal's racket too....that Mid Wood looks pretty hardcore though

Petekbladetour1
03-30-2008, 04:14 AM
Prokennex kinetic

ratm355
03-30-2008, 06:43 AM
So between these Pro Kennex racquets, which one would be the one to demo?

ProKennex Kinetic Pro 5G
ProKennex Ionic Ki 5
ProKennex Ionic Ki 5 PSE


It sounds like they're all supposed to be pretty comfortable. I'm guessing the weight of the Ki 5 PSE would make it the most comfortable. However, on the review of the Ki 5, they stated several times that the 5g was softer. That's kind of odd since it has a higher flex rating. So, which one of those is the most comfortable?

TennisProdigy
03-30-2008, 07:12 AM
Similar to you I had a complex fracture to my wrist from basketball. It was when I was 13. I was playing soccer and basketball at that time so when I healed up I didnt both to do rehabilation exercises. Due to this mistake when I officially wanted to start playing tennis at 14 1/2 I couldn't because my wrist hurt too much on all strokes.

So, during that time I realized I had mobility and strength issues with my left wrist (the one I broke and is my dominant hand) so I started doing strength exercises and mobility exercises everyday for about 15 minutes.

Finally at the age of 16 my wrist was strong enough to play, I started with a prince triple threat bandit os. I used my dad's gamma synthetic gut string. I didn't have pain but my forehand was a very unnatural stroke but my 2h bh was already at a 3.5 level somehow.

After 2 months my timing, strength, and technique improved but I still used the eastern grip on every single stroke. Everything was the same for about 2 more months when I tried a tennis coach. He showed me what a continental and semi-western grip was. I could not pronate my wrist for a serve with the continental grip at that time and neither could I hit a forehand semi-western due to my wrist. I continues mobility training and at 5 months I switched to a FULL western for some reason and practiced continental serves even though my eastern serve was at a 3.5 level.

Eventually after 7 months I could serve with the continental grip (not well) was hitting with a full western that was hit with a lot of spin, used babolat pdc, but still could not volley or overhead to save my life.

One day my wrist started to hurt again on the ulnar side. I knew right away that it was from my imperfect timing with the full western. I took a week off and when I started again I used a half western or extreme semi western (the grip nadal uses) which is what I thought to be the semi-western.

At 9 months I had my technique down and after about 10 demos decided on the pure storm team. Within the next two months I improved greatly by playing almost everyday and practicing with my 5.0 father. By 11 months (now) I can pronate perfectly to hit a wicked slice serve, clean overheads, ok volleys, heavy topspin forehands, but as usual my 2h bh stands above the rest of my strokes at a 4.5 level.

Lol thats my tennis life story, advice for you, do some wrist exercises and get a coach.

abrahavt
03-30-2008, 07:47 AM
I have owned a number of comfortable racquets like the RDX500, ProKennex 5G etc. The racquet that beats everything else in comfort is the PowerAngle 98. Not sure if you can still get them.

Djokovicfan4life
03-30-2008, 07:49 AM
The strings will make a bigger difference in my opinion, try Babolat VS.

Steve Huff
03-30-2008, 05:35 PM
I have some bad news for you. Generally, heavier, more flexible rackets are easier on the wrist and elbow. However, heavier rackets can be harder on your shoulder. You're going to have to find a compromise somewhere. If you can find one of the older Pro Kennex 5gs, at around 11 oz, you might find that an acceptable compromise. Possible a Volkl V1 or Catapult V1 MP. If these still bother your shoulder, you should go lighter. Maybe something like a Prince Shark Hybrid MP. For your wrist's sake, I would stay with a 27" long racket (as opposed to the ones that are a little bit longer).

hrstrat57
03-30-2008, 07:03 PM
volkl v1 classic w gut

montx
03-30-2008, 07:30 PM
If you are worried about injury and comfort, I would not play with a light racquet but a heavier racquet with a low swingweight. I highly reccomend the Boris Becker 11 Midplus standard not the light. The sensor II handle and the Heavier weight of the frame will absorb more shock.

Good Luck and God Bless. I hope this will solve your problem.

Also I play with a similar to Federer setup using Gut Mains and the Luxilon crosses. I suggest rather you go with total gut crosses strung at a low tension such as 56.

I think you can do it.

ThiTran
03-30-2008, 07:56 PM
Try the Avery M3 95 sq inches control version with some soft string...Babolat Tonic+ gut or multifilament at lower tension 53 to 56 lbs.

Alafter
03-30-2008, 08:29 PM
Unfortunately, the only people whose recommendations are worth anything are those with similar injuries. So when you read for advice, take note that those who never had the injury will absolutely have no understanding of your pain, and you can discount them right off the bat.

jasonchu
03-30-2008, 09:03 PM
N-blade
K-blade

But they are not open string patterns.

I have found that the K-blade is a little unstable ... and may lead
to wrist/elbow problems if you dont hit it just right.

Now add some lead tape at 3 and 9 and then the k-blade is stable
Add some more inside the grip, and you have a k-factor six-one 95
or ncode 95...

So the blades are not a bad choice, but if you dont like lead then go with the ncode or k-factor six-one 95.

the best arm friendly racquet is the Prince Graphite Classic OS or MP
www.racquetresearch.com has all the specs and the SCIENCE behind tennis racquets and arm problems.

good luck

jasonchu
03-30-2008, 09:04 PM
So between these Pro Kennex racquets, which one would be the one to demo?

ProKennex Kinetic Pro 5G
ProKennex Ionic Ki 5
ProKennex Ionic Ki 5 PSE


It sounds like they're all supposed to be pretty comfortable. I'm guessing the weight of the Ki 5 PSE would make it the most comfortable. However, on the review of the Ki 5, they stated several times that the 5g was softer. That's kind of odd since it has a higher flex rating. So, which one of those is the most comfortable?

the kinetic

tzinc
03-31-2008, 12:54 AM
I love threads like this because someone says a light racquet will cause the most discomfort and then someone will say a heavy racquet will cause the most discomfort. Then someone says a high flex racquet will cause discomfort and then someone says a high stiffness racquet will cause discomfort. ?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?

JediMindTrick
03-31-2008, 08:07 AM
From my experience the Prince O3 Tour is exactly what you are looking for.

timsims
03-31-2008, 08:19 AM
Pro Kennex 5G, this has to be the best answer. String it with gut or a multi in the 50s and you'll be playing with the "plush luxury car" of the tennis racquet world. Although they're harder to find, the heavier PSE version is my personal choice.

pmerk34
03-31-2008, 08:44 AM
Unfortunately, the only people whose recommendations are worth anything are those with similar injuries. So when you read for advice, take note that those who never had the injury will absolutely have no understanding of your pain, and you can discount them right off the bat.


I have gotten Tennis elbow twice. Once 10 years ago I was breaking strings a lot. I did not realize at the time it was due to the fact I had switched to a " long Body" 28.5 inches long Prince Thunderbolt midplus. I tried Prince Endurance String and immediately got tennis elbow. I switched back to regular Prince synthetic Gut took a month off and the problem went away immediately.

The second time was this past fall. I bought a a head heavy, very light (9.9 oz unstrung), very stiff (73 rdc) frame and it caused the problem.

I recommend getting the heaviest racquet you can handle, headlight balance, and a flex around 64 and stay away from poly strings.

f1 tech
03-31-2008, 09:01 AM
Time to get an MRI.

strike
03-31-2008, 09:55 AM
My vote is the Wilson nTour nCode Two 95. They also make/made a 105 version I believe. Includes the updated nFoam throughout the racquet. TW seems to be going back and forth between having or not having this racquet...but this is it:

http://www.tennis-x.com/racquets/2006-10-27/7.php

Put some Technifibre X-One Biphase in this and I think you have an extremely arm friendly racquet that also plays very well.

My doubles partner who was considering surgery on his wrist has no pain with this racquet. He was using a Babolat Pure Drive Plus.

basil J
03-31-2008, 10:25 AM
PK redondo Mp. Easily the most comfortable frame I have ever used.

haerdalis
03-31-2008, 11:26 AM
I'd say a PK kinetic racquet or the wilson nfury and some lead.

Racket-Junkie
03-31-2008, 02:57 PM
I have cronic tennis elbow. From what I found testing a ton of rackets this winter was that right now it is hard to go wrong with prince speedport/ozone and a soft multi/ng. I settled on the sp tour but the sp black, white, and ozone tour (still bitter pro tour wasn't available yet while demoing) were all comfy on the arm. The next closest in comfort are the new becker's. If you have the game to support the 11mp or 11mid they are both great comfy rackets and great on the arm. I completely understand what the op is talking about when he says he doesnt want to feel the ball at all. Until you've had really bad arm issues it is hard to really understand, what other people call dead feeling I call perfect. Low tension multi on the Becker or 03 lines provide a nice thump sound, you can tell you hit the ball but you don't get the feedback. For the time being I would avoid babolat like the plague, don't get me wrong, they make great rackets but they play stiff and are not arm friendly. Also the new kfactors tend to be harsh on sensative arms. If you want Wilson try the old ncodes, I used the nblade and with a thick overgrip and strung at low tensions it is fantastic, buy like the op I like open patterns right now and the nblade is dense. The new kblade plays nothing like the nblade and hurt my arm severely, the kblade tour was better than the mp in terms of comfort but was no where near the nblade. The tf 320 and 335 both come in a 16x20 but despite the specs they both transfer a fair amount of vibration. Of the head rackets the radical line had always been the most gentle for me to use, the mg. Radical pro is worth a demo, but again it needs to be at a low tension, this racket was nice but still hurt may arm after a few hours. Avoid the prestige line, while it breaks my heart to say it (there really is nothing prettier than a well hit prestige mid forehand) these rackets are too demanding for bad arms, if you mishit a serve kiss your arm goodbye even when it is strung with ng. I liked the rq is tour on groundies but again if you mishit a serve you will feel it.

Note, these are just my impressions as a fellow player with arm issues. Ultimately you can take any frame and with enough lead and low tension gut make it comfy, I just personally hate having to tape up my stick and ultimately turn it into something completely different. Unfortunately I have not tried any pro kennix sticks and cannot comment. No matter what you try, I cannot recommend x-1 biphase enough as a string, I use it as a cross and so far the only poly main at 50-52lbs that has given me trouble is BB alu rough. Hope this post helps, sorry for grammar and spelling, I'm using my phone while at work.

Stan
03-31-2008, 03:12 PM
Try the Kneissl Black Star. It's flexible and has great specs. Plays nicely and is very easy on the arm. String it with a multi in the 60s's and you are good to go!

skraggle
03-31-2008, 04:09 PM
Prince TT Warrior MP might work. If you can give up the MP desire, the Warrior OS is even flexier.

ratm355
03-31-2008, 06:40 PM
Wow, there is a lot of useful information in this thread. Thank you everyone! I'm going to decide on 4 demo rackets and just go from there. I'll probably order them a week or so from now. Unfortunately, it looks like the ProKennex Kinetic Pro 5G stopped being available for demoing since my last post :(.

I have owned a number of comfortable racquets like the RDX500, ProKennex 5G etc. The racquet that beats everything else in comfort is the PowerAngle 98. Not sure if you can still get them.

The PowerAngle rackets are getting harder to find. Tennis Warehouse, the sole reseller, took the one racket they listed of theirs off the site a couple weeks ago I think. It was well over $200 anyway and you have to buy special clamps to string it.

Also the new kfactors tend to be harsh on sensative arms.

I have had the same experience. My friend stopped playing with his K SixOne 95 18x20 due to arm problems. I hit with it for about 5 minutes and yeah...lets just say I was out for 3 weeks after trying that racket.

I'll start looking into seeing what exercises I can be doing for my shoulder and wrist. I'll probably get an appointment set up to have my shoulder checked out too. Please keep the advice coming. You're helping me a lot and anyone who reads this in the future. I really appreciate all the help. I know I'll be able to play pain-free tennis with a racket I like thanks to you guys :cool: . I'll be sure to post any updates.

shell
03-31-2008, 09:13 PM
One more thing to think about...you might try one of those worm vibe dampeners. They make the strangest feel, like dead and no feel. It might help your wrist. I don't have an arm problem, but have found I really like the weird feel and dull sound.

saram
03-31-2008, 09:31 PM
o3 rackets + soft multi.

wow--we agree!

fsannuto
03-31-2008, 10:24 PM
The first thing I would do is see a a sports doctor. If he/she gives you the okay to play tennis than I would proceed to look for a flexible medium weight racquet. I have wrist problems myself and as result have played with many tennis racquets. The only racquet that I would recommend is the Volkl Catapult 4 Gen II. It weights around 10oz, is headlight, flexible and it has a low swingweight. Since it is so lightweight it makes it highly customizable, you can use it as is in stock form or add as much weight as you like. I use this racquet as a backup and play with it when my wrist is real sore. I have it strung with Babolat VS Team 17g @ 52lbs in stock form. Playing with this racquet as I suggested should cure your problems assuming you are using proper form. If you do not use proper form and execution, I do not think there is a racquet that can cure your problems. I hope this helps.
Good luck

baek57
03-31-2008, 10:47 PM
I would recommend the heaviest frame you could use. for me, anything under 12oz minimum that i've tried gives me TE. Some frames at 12+ do, some don't... none have so far at 13+. As far as I know there arent any stock 13+ oz frames, you will need to add lead for that.

backcourt
04-01-2008, 07:27 AM
I have had shoulder impingement problems for years, and have found a medium weight racquet, somewhere between 11.1 to 11.8 or so works best. It should also be head light and have a flex rating under 65. The most shoulder friendly stick I have found is the Yonex mp 3i. Unfortunately they are discontinued but you may be able to find one on these boards or ****. Every year or so I switch to a bigger headed racquet up from the 3i's 95, but I have never found a better racquet for my shoulder. ONe of the racquets I tried a couple of years ago was a Ki 5, but I found it swung a bit heavy, and actually had shoulder pain on the backhand.
I just picked up a PK 5g from these boards and will see how that works once it arrives. But will always keep my mp 3i's around. BTW if you cant get a 5g demo, there are several listed for sale in the TW classifieds right now. Good luck!

Oh, I also found the Yonex RDX 500 mp to be good on the shoulder, just lacked a bit of pop for me.

ratm355
04-01-2008, 05:19 PM
you might try one of those worm vibe dampeners.

I actually have a Gamma Shockbuster that came with my stringer. I just haven't used it...I'll give it a try and see how it does.

I think I'll try to pick up an O3 Tour Midplus and see how it does with good strings in addition to the four demo rackets. When I played with the Ozone Tour, it was kind of weird. It just had standard synthetic gut strings at probably around mid tension. It didn't have much vibrations at all, but it really wasn't that comfortable. However, with the Prince Tour Diablo Midplus, it had quite a bit more vibrations, but was significantly more comfortable. I should note that the Diablo was strung with TNT2 at mid tension, but it's still weird that it was more comfortable even though it had more vibrations. I'm curious if certain O3 rackets are more comfortable than others that you wouldn't expect due to the composition. I noticed the Prince O3 White uses GraphitExtreme (the same as the Diablo), but the O3 Tour uses high modulus graphite. So, I suppose it's possible that the O3 White would be more comfortable due to the composition despite the lighter weight and higher flex rating. On the Tennis Warehouse reviews, it shows a comfort rating of 74 for the O3 Tour and 86 for the O3 White. The playtesters might have just been in a better mood when playing with the O3 white though. Anybody played with both of these rackets and know if one is more comfortable than the other?

ratm355
05-25-2008, 07:06 PM
Well, I've been trying every comfortable racket known to man for the last couple of months. I haven't done any exercising or strengthening yet because I wanted to try out different rackets while my injuries were the most sensitive. I still haven't decided on a racket, but I figured I'd share what I've found.

There definitely is a big difference between what works for rotator cuff injuries and wrist injuries. I've found that the bottom line for my wrist injury was just to go with the racket and strings that absorb the most shock. For the shoulder, a low swingweight, 27" or shorter, oversized head, flexible racket was the best. The shock absorption technologies just weren't enough to save my shoulder. It really had to fit some or most of the specs listed above as well.

I'll make some recommendations for comfortable rackets for wrist injuries. I'm guessing these would apply to tennis elbow too, but I don't know. As far as shoulder injuries, just search for the specs I listed. I'll stick to rackets that are for the most part readily available today. The main categories that worked best for me were the following:

Triad, graphite/fiberglass composites, Head's Electronic Dampening System

So, here are a few that would fit those categories:
Wilson n5 Force, Wilson n3, Donnay Pro One International, Head Protector

One step down in comfort would be 100% graphite rackets and Fischer's GDS system. Some of those would be:
POG, Avery rackets, Pro Kennex Heritage Type C Redondo, Donnay Pro One OS, Fischer GDS M Rally

Obviously, I'm not listing near all the rackets that fit the above categories so you'll have to do some of your own research. Here are some other rackets that aren't as comfortable as the rackets above, but might be worth trying if you think they would be the perfect fit for your game:

Volkl and Boris Becker rackets with the Sensor Plus handle, Head Microgel Radical Pro

I did try most of the rackets that people recommended in this thread or at least a similar racket. Obviously I couldn't try every racket that might be comfortable though so I'm sure I'm leaving some out that deserve to be on those lists. Here are some rackets I found not to be comfortable that are known as comfortable rackets. Keep in mind, this is just one person's findings.

Volkl C10 Pro - it must be the kevlar in it
Prince O3 rackets - these rackets did have all the shock that you'd expect with the specs they have (high modulus graphite, some on the stiff side, low weight). The O3 did help a lot with the residual vibrations though. This doesn't help prevent arm injuries unfortunately. It just gives the illusion of a comfortable racket to people who don't have serious injuries. They do have a larger sweet spot which helps though.
Pro Kennex Kinetic rackets - These have the same problem as the O3 rackets and aren't any more comfortable than their specs indicate (ultra high modulus graphite is the main problem). They have all the shock, but less vibrations. Actually, these rackets have less vibrations than any racket I played with. However, the initial shock still hurt my wrist. I really did like the performance of these rackets though.

These are things to stay away from with rackets:
Wilson KFactor, Babolat Pure Drive, high modulus graphite, extremely stiff or lightweight rackets, head-heavy rackets. All of this is assuming there is no comfort enhancing technology to compensate.

I haven't talked much about strings, but I think it's fairly well-known what is comfortable and what is not with strings.


Here are some other notes and conclusions I came to:

Lead tape didn't seem to help much. A couple neat, cheap tricks are the Babolat RVS dampener and the Gamma Pro RX grip. These are both definitely worth using. The Babolat dampener doesn't fit in all rackets and does tend to move up which stops it from being effective. Other people have recommended using a little bit of glue on the strings to hold it in place. I haven't tried that yet. Definitely use a pretty good sized grip. With larger grips, you won't have to hold on to the racket as tight. Obviously, don't go too big where it negatively impacts your play. I just used the heat shrink sleeves Tennis Warehouse sells. You can put them on in layers if necessary. The worm dampeners are pretty interesting. They don't help prevent injuries at all. However, they do give it a unique feel. I think I'll use them because they kind of make it feel as if it were more comfortable than what it is which helps give me confidence to swing freely.

Well, I hope this helps a few people. I know you guys have really helped me A LOT! Thank you everyone. I'll post more if I have anything to add. Anybody just now reading this thread, feel free to add your suggestions.

skraggle
07-03-2008, 10:59 AM
Personally, I find the C10 to be the most comfortable frame out there, but that's what makes racquets as a topic so interesting.

If you can find a PK Type R, that might really fit the bill for you.

ratm355
07-03-2008, 11:31 AM
yeah, the PK type R looks pretty similar to the Head Satellite Tour which I enjoyed playing with. Unfortunately, I injured my other wrist hitting a two-handed backhand with the POG OS strung tight. I thought it played stiffer than what a lot of people say, but it had excellent performance if you prefer a slightly heavier racket. I played continuously after that and it only got worse and I did some yardwork that bothered it too. I woke up Saturday morning and it hurt to move it in any direction so now it is immobilized with a brace. I'm supposed to keep the brace on for two weeks and lay off tennis until it is completely healed. He said I could play tennis with the brace on after the two weeks, but it's kind of hard to play with your wrist immobilized :( . I'm going to start the wrist exercises once it's healed up. The shoulder problems go away as long as I use a real flexible racket and gradually warm up the serve for 15 to 30 minutes before match play. I still have another snag because now my knee is bothering me if I play for more than half an hour. I've had three knee surgeries total (2 on one knee and one on the other...torn ACLs) and they haven't been quite the same since then. I've already got an appointment scheduled with the doctor for that. By the way...I'm only 22 :? . I'll give everything another go in a few months hopefully after I'm a little fitter.

dora_75
07-03-2008, 01:05 PM
my 2c ... I had shoulder and wrist issues. Shoulder because of bad technique on serve wrist because of the exact same problem you're having, high balls. I know you won't like it but is not the racquet, is only the technique and physical condition. For shoulder I suggest do a lot of strengthening for the small muscles that keep the shoulder together ( elastic bands exercises done regularly .. check with a pt). For the wrist problem, there are 2 things you can do take the ball early (my choice) and don't let it bounce high, or take it late at about waist height (if you don't hit the fence by then). I did the same as you and changed racquets (C10) but the biggest improvement came from changing technique and a lot of strength and conditioning.

There is a saying between runners if it hurts you should stop, otherwise you'll get injured!

s7evin
07-03-2008, 07:54 PM
Nblade + Lux BB alu power rough mid tension = beutiful soft/buttery feel

roundiesee
07-04-2008, 12:40 AM
ratm355, I was just wondering if you have tried the Head Twin Tube rackets, like the prestige series, MG prestige, Head Andre Agassi limited edition series; any of those suitable for your problems? Thanks!

origmarm
07-04-2008, 01:37 AM
For what it's worth my brother broke his right wrist on a snowboard 3yrs ago, he's never been quite the same and he plays with a Redondo. Use to play a Bab PD and just can't now.

ratm355
07-04-2008, 08:56 AM
I've played with the discontinued Head Satellite Tour and the Microgel Radical Pro. I didn't really give either of those rackets a fair shot because I was already mildly injured when I hit with them. I would say both of those were quite comfortable rackets with the Radical Pro playing quite a bit stiffer than the Satellite. I liked them both and may end up playing with one of those or one like it after I do some strength conditioning. I played with the Microgel Prestige Pro briefly, but it didn't seem as comfortable as the Radical. The problem I've found is that with a lot of the newer rackets, I have to string them tight or use a polyester hybrid to get the control I want...both of which make it harder on the arm. I may end up going for something more old school like a Redondo, Donnay Pro One International, or Avery M3 Control and stringing with natural gut. I still haven't tried any of those rackets yet (only similar ones) or natural gut...I was planning on trying natural gut next until the recent injuries.

I don't think technique is as much as problem as it used to be for me...I've adjusted my strokes and serve quite a bit since the original injuries. Both the shoulder and right wrist bother me doing normal activities outside of tennis too and audibly pop and crunch when I move them a certain way...all the more reason to do some strength conditioning. I think I might have been wrong when I said high forehands are what bothers my wrist because I'll hit lots of high forehands without any problems and then one ball will come in heavy and I'll return it hard (probably with an off-center hit) and that's when I get the first sign of pain. After that, it's all downhill and I probably noticed it more on high forehands. I already take groundstrokes early on both sides when I can and I'm sure it helps. I'll talk to a coach about it though because you still might be right about the wrist. I know my serve has good technique now. When I injured it hitting a serve years ago, I had pretty poor technique, was playing in the cold, went all out on the first serve of the day, and the racket was strung at 75 lbs in an 18x20 string pattern with synthetic gut (that's not what I requested, but it's what ended up being done). I heard a pop and couldn't lift my arm laterally for the next few days after that. I've never seen a doctor about it or done physical therapy so hopefully that problem will be fixed doing both of those things...even now though it isn't too bad as long as it's thoroughly warmed up before I go after the serves. The recent left wrist injury does confuse me a bit because I do have real good technique on the backhand and have never had a problem with it in the past. I think I must have worn it down some doing a lot of yardwork, housework, and lifting things with my wrist turned and then the tennis may have just been the last straw.

I definitely agree with you about the technique and physical condition. Before I adjusted my strokes and serve, there just wasn't a chance of staying healthy. The physical conditioning will be the obvious next step and I'll consult a coach to be sure on the technique. I already have an appointment scheduled with the orthopedist so I'll ask him about the shoulder in addition to the knee. Maybe I'm just borderline with some of my injuries, but I noticed a huge difference in comfort between some rackets so I'd say it's definitely worthwhile to do all three things: improve technique, improve physical condition, and get an arm-friendly racket and strings...might as well go all out as a preventative measure. After all, we only get older.

ratm355
07-11-2008, 12:51 PM
Well, I tried out some wrist exercises on my right wrist (the one not in a brace) just to see how it would do. I can't even do a "wrist flexion" strengthening exercise using a dumbbell with no weight on it...the bar probably only weighs around a pound or less. Here is what I'm talking about...

http://rehabworks.ksc.nasa.gov/education/protocols/basicwristelbow.php

it's called wrist flexion on that page. I never have been able to lift much with my right wrist turned since it was fractured a long time ago, but I don't know how I can get it any better since I can't even lift a dumbell with no weight on it without my wrist crunching/popping and hurting the whole time I'm doing it. The wrist isn't flared up or anything...it's just like it always is as far as I can tell. The last time I asked the doctor about this, he said that my wrist was stable and there wasn't anything that could be done. I guess I should get a second opinion....???....???

matchmaker
07-11-2008, 03:07 PM
One more thing to think about...you might try one of those worm vibe dampeners. They make the strangest feel, like dead and no feel. It might help your wrist. I don't have an arm problem, but have found I really like the weird feel and dull sound.

I did the comparative test and those worm vibe dampeners don't do a thing. The simple O dampener is the best and even a simple rubber band knot around the two central strings takes all vibration away. I tested it and there is no doubt about it for me. The worm dampener is just a useless gizmo, it does not filter out the vibration.

HappyLefty
07-11-2008, 07:13 PM
volkl v1 classic w gut

I second this.

Other good options are:
Boris Becker V1
POG Oversize
Strings:
Xcel from Babolat
X-One Biphase from Technifibre

HappyLefty
07-11-2008, 07:17 PM
Nblade + Lux BB alu power rough mid tension = beutiful soft/buttery feel

Alu Power rough? Never. Itīs a poly. Stay away from poly if you want to have healthy joints.

Steve Huff
07-11-2008, 08:31 PM
As someone mentioned, you should listen to those who have been there. I have bad joints due to immunosuppressant meds I take. Generally, heavier, flexible rackets are great for the elbow. But, as I mentioned before, too heavy can tear up your shoulder. One of my favorite rackets of all time is the Pro Kennex Ceramic Destiny. It had good flex, good feel and was truly solid. Unfortunately, it weighed over 13 oz strung. It took approx 2 weeks before my shoulder felt as if it were coming out of socket every time I served. I'm using an older version of the 5g now. It's been modified some, and weighs around 12 oz strung, which is a good weight for what I like. Is it the best? Well, I probably played better with the Cer. Destiny. But, it was the best compromise I could make.

robby c
07-11-2008, 09:30 PM
I have 4 Head Satellites that I returned to after elbow pain set in. I've been missing my old POG for the rounder handle shape. Let me know if you're in the market for Satellites. I've had elbow pain this year because I tried to switch to ncode Prostaff Tour 90's after a 10 year layoff. Dumb,dumb,dumb.
Good luck.
Robby C

ratm355
09-22-2008, 03:21 PM
Well, I'm headed on the right track now. I just kept doing the exercises on right wrist working through the pain and it's finally healed up and I'm not having any problems anymore. I've been to the doctor with everything else. Apparently I have a shoulder impingement which is what's causing the shoulder problems. The left wrist was a strained tendon. The knee problem is from the ACL surgery when they cut on the patella tendon. So far it hasn't helped on the shoulder and I'm going back in tomorrow and will be starting PT on the knee then too. The doctor recommended physical therapy for all of the above. The wrist/elbow strengthening is something I would recommend to any serious tennis player or those who just have to play with poly or kevlar strings. As far as comfortable rackets go, the two current rackets that I would recommend would be the Pro Kennex Type C Redondo 98 if you're looking for control and the Head Microgel Radical OS if you're looking for power. I'd like to try the Boris Becker 11 Mid someday, but it looked like it might be tougher on the shoulder than the other two. Natural gut is definitely the way to go....well worth the $$$. I've found that I like a hybrid of natural gut on the mains and Laserfibre LaserTour on the crosses. I'm selling all the rackets that I've bought and ended up not sticking with. There are some extremely arm friendly sticks on the list. I posted them on the forums at
http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=221516 . Thanks to everybody who helped!

tenniscan
09-22-2008, 05:44 PM
fishcher mp 105 is really easy on the arm...even easier than a Volkl Cat 4 and that is pretty easy.

2nd_Serve
09-22-2008, 06:40 PM
Prince O3 rackets, and Speedport Black are really comfortable. Try those out.

gonzalocatalino
09-23-2008, 03:25 AM
I like to play with racquets with a midplus headsize, open string pattern, head-light balance, flexible frame, control-oriented, and a long enough handle for a 2-handed backhand

Try the Prince graphite longbody!

Fed Kennedy
09-23-2008, 09:36 AM
POG OS with gut or xcel.
The microgels are also really damp

forehand2theface
09-23-2008, 01:04 PM
Head ti.5 comfort zone

shell
09-23-2008, 02:30 PM
Well, I'm headed on the right track now. I just kept doing the exercises on right wrist working through the pain and it's finally healed up and I'm not having any problems anymore. I've been to the doctor with everything else. Apparently I have a shoulder impingement which is what's causing the shoulder problems. The left wrist was a strained tendon. The knee problem is from the ACL surgery when they cut on the patella tendon. So far it hasn't helped on the shoulder and I'm going back in tomorrow and will be starting PT on the knee then too. The doctor recommended physical therapy for all of the above. The wrist/elbow strengthening is something I would recommend to any serious tennis player or those who just have to play with poly or kevlar strings. As far as comfortable rackets go, the two current rackets that I would recommend would be the Pro Kennex Type C Redondo 98 if you're looking for control and the Head Microgel Radical OS if you're looking for power. I'd like to try the Boris Becker 11 Mid someday, but it looked like it might be tougher on the shoulder than the other two. Natural gut is definitely the way to go....well worth the $$$. I've found that I like a hybrid of natural gut on the mains and Laserfibre LaserTour on the crosses. I'm selling all the rackets that I've bought and ended up not sticking with. There are some extremely arm friendly sticks on the list. I posted them on the forums at
http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=221516 . Thanks to everybody who helped!

Good to hear that things are finally on the mend. That was a tough list of injuries!

ratm355
09-23-2008, 02:52 PM
and that's not even counting the injuries that I've already successfully recovered from :)

It's not quite as bad as it sounds though...I had just neglected going to the doctor for so long (and I went to a new orthopedist who was much more helpful)...so not all those injuries happened at once. That's pretty much just the sum of injuries over the last 6 years that I hadn't taken care of when it first happened. I'm convinced that the recent left wrist injury was partially from trying all these different rackets which resulted in a fair amount of mishit balls since I wasn't used to any of the rackets I was trying. Also, I was playing with a POG OS strung with synthetic gut at 62 lbs when it started which isn't very arm friendly to begin with mainly because of the strings, and the new tour version of the POG is actually fairly stiff and has some high frequency vibrations without the Babolat RVS dampener. I had been pushing it too hard doing yardwork too.

I'm glad too and I'll be ready for some local tournaments next year 8)

amx13
09-23-2008, 03:11 PM
I use to have tennis elbow, but after testing a lot of frames last year, like the Babolat APDC, Volkl DNX 10, Dunlop AG 200, Head Radical Pro, Yonex RDS 001, Pro Kennex Ki 5G, Wilson nBlade and some others I cant remeber right now, I found that the most comfortable racquet for me is the Head Pro Tour 280. I can even put luxilon strings on them and still play pain-free.

Chicken Neck
09-23-2008, 03:13 PM
Volkl c10 Pro

shell
09-23-2008, 03:30 PM
and that's not even counting the injuries that I've already successfully recovered from :)

It's not quite as bad as it sounds though...I had just neglected going to the doctor for so long (and I went to a new orthopedist who was much more helpful)...so not all those injuries happened at once. That's pretty much just the sum of injuries over the last 6 years that I hadn't taken care of when it first happened. I'm convinced that the recent left wrist injury was partially from trying all these different rackets which resulted in a fair amount of mishit balls since I wasn't used to any of the rackets I was trying. Also, I was playing with a POG OS strung with synthetic gut at 62 lbs when it started which isn't very arm friendly to begin with mainly because of the strings, and the new tour version of the POG is actually fairly stiff and has some high frequency vibrations without the Babolat RVS dampener. I had been pushing it too hard doing yardwork too.

I'm glad too and I'll be ready for some local tournaments next year 8)

Well there is your problem....abandon the yard work!! It is bad for your tennis! :)

Bad Dog
09-23-2008, 04:37 PM
Volkl c10 Pro

Agreed – Volkl C10 Pro 98

danix
09-25-2008, 06:29 PM
C10 Pro 98 with gut, low tension. If you can find one, the older Catapult 10 might be interesting too.

pow
09-26-2008, 12:39 AM
Redondo MP

although I like the Redondo Mid better.

Revman
09-26-2008, 03:47 AM
The most comfortable and arm-friendly racquets I ever played with (and I've played with hundreds) were the Dunlop Revelation Tour Pro (maroon and black), Dunlop Select Pro (gold), and Dunlop Classic Pro (Blue). The Tour Pro turns up with some regularity on the auction site, while the other two are a bit harder to find. The Classic Pro is the softest of the three. Hitting with it was like hitting with a pillow. All three had the "ISIS" system in the handle.

ilian
12-09-2008, 10:16 AM
Dunlop Max 200G. No other like it.

plasma
12-18-2008, 06:18 PM
I THINK that anything made in the last 10 years will be way too stiff for u, I am a vintage rackaholic, though. These are some famous yet great mushy sticks for you, sorry, but i think the racks you listed are stiff as hell and not that great.
dunlop 200g
rossignol f200
pro kennex (never actually touched one, but they are famous for being soft)
fischer
Jack Kramer staff mid
in fact, even frames from that era which are regarded as stiff are much more flexible and soft than todays sticks. Oh I almost forgot...Donnay wst cobalt and pro one are as soft as a babies hiney!
pls let us know what you everntually chose....good luck, comfy hitting!

ratm355
12-18-2008, 07:33 PM
believe it or not, I still haven't settled on a racket. I've got a cold right now, but I'm plan on picking a racket over the winter and getting used to it by the time summer rolls around. I'll make a post when I decide on one. I've definitely decided on strings though....NATURAL GUT :)

Mick
12-18-2008, 07:45 PM
the problem is what is a comfortable racquet to one person may not be a comfortable racquet to the next person.

you can look at the choices of other people but you have to try them out.

ratm355
01-07-2009, 08:22 AM
Well, I finally settled on the Max 200G. I'd say I could play with most rackets strung with natural gut now though. Physical therapy is really what helped me the most. I'm selling all the rackets I tried and didn't end up sticking with. Several of them are already strung with natural gut. Here's a link to them...there's some really nice arm friendly rackets there:

http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=238382


THANKS TO ALL WHO POSTED!

yemenmocha
01-07-2009, 11:47 AM
You try many of the multifilament strings on the market? I've found they're very comparable if not better than gut. I love Gamma Professional.

ratm355
01-07-2009, 11:53 AM
Yeah, I liked Gamma Professional, Tecnifibre E-Matrix, and Golden Set Maximal. All very playable synthetics. None of them hold their tension well and play looser each time. They also put a lot more stress on rackets during stringing due to all the prestretching which can cause the rackets to deform/compress a little. I like natural gut because it plays even better than those, more durable, and holds tension much better. Well worth the extra $$.

harryz
01-07-2009, 03:06 PM
very close to C10 and 200G MW. Soft with great feel, box beam and HL balance. Sweet stick. Let me know if you're interested in any...

skraggle
01-07-2009, 03:31 PM
very close to C10 and 200G MW. Soft with great feel, box beam and HL balance. Sweet stick. Let me know if you're interested in any...

Agreed. This is one of the best lighter player's sticks I've hit with...

goosala
01-07-2009, 03:54 PM
Yes, the Gamma G325 is a nice player's frame. The feel and balance is right on. I like it much better than the old PS Classic 6.1 which was too powerful and headlight.

harryz
01-07-2009, 07:23 PM
So many posters love the PS 6.0 95 and the G325 is a better stick for me with superior frame to frame consistency. Lord knows I wanted to like the PS and have owned more than a few. G325 pattern is good for spin, it has a thin box beam, nice feel and unpretentious technology. Just a solid stick with great control and good pop. BUT it's a Gamma, with no pro endorsements. Oh well. Seems that's where we are these days.