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View Full Version : Forehand is messed up, need help with it, please


SpinningForehand
03-29-2008, 04:54 PM
Well, my forehand sucks. I should change my username to noforehand. I use a western grip, and my racket is a prince o3 tour mid. I have bought and watched countlessly the millenium forehand video as well as watching the forehand videos at fuzzyyellowballs.com. I have tried emulating each of their exact movements. It seems that I can do the forehand exactly like they do in the videos without a ball coming at me, but when the ball is coming at me, and i try, the forehand just sucks. It seems too mechanical and unnatural. I always have to think about it. For instance, before I hit a forehand I am thinking too myself take racket back with elbow first , then drop it , and then turn the hips,etc, but the shot still sucks even though I do it. Its not smooth or natural. When I try making it natural and smooth and not think about it, the shot still is pretty bad. My backhand , on the other hand, is much better compared to my forehand. I never have to think about what im doing. It is the same evey time and I never have to change it. It is comfortable with me. I just feel lost with my forehand. If anyone can help me get a natural , smooth, never changing solid, spinny, forehand stroke, even just a little bit, I would appreciate it a lot. Sorry for the paragraph.

Thanks

Zachol82
03-29-2008, 05:30 PM
As weird as this may sound, please post a video of your forehand AND backhand. I know it's hard to post your flaws to the public but hey, that's the best way any of us can help you out.

When you say it's "bad," we really don't have a clue.

However, I can guess that your timing is probably off since that's where most problems come from in Tennis. Just play more, and don't push yourself till you can't even walk. Practice a lot, but stop if you are too tired since when you're tired, you will start to execute shots with bad form and this can affect your muscle memory which is not good.

quicken
03-29-2008, 11:57 PM
You just need to practice more, with practice your forehand should come/feel natural.

Petekbladetour1
03-30-2008, 03:54 AM
Try this. When you hit a forehand do not think about your technique, just do what comes naturaly to you.

vndesu
03-30-2008, 04:09 AM
if you post a vid it would help me a lot more.
i like the explanation but id like to see how you would hit during a match

Essential Tennis
03-30-2008, 06:50 AM
You're trying to do too much at once man. The human brain can literally only focus on one thing at a time, you mentioned three things that you're trying to accomplish all at the same time, and I know that there's more. It's not possible to take several new technique moves and make them all feel good together immediately unless you're really an amazing athlete.

So what you need to do, is take one thing at a time, or maybe two things at a time and get comfortable doing them. You're looking for a quick fix here, watch this video and this video.........and then just do it! Sorry man it's going to take more work. Take one element that you feel is good from one of those videos, get a ball machine, a hitting wall, or a friend and a bunch of tennis balls and do that one element over and over and over until you're able to do it without thinking about it. Please realize, this could take days, weeks, months. It's going to depend on how often you practice it, and how many repetitions.

When you're able to do the first element without thinking, go to the next and so on, building on top of what you're able to complete.

At the club I teach at, there are several guys that I see two or three times per week for private lessons, two of them for over two years now. Sometimes new technique changes come within a lesson or two, others will take several weeks at three privates per week, and still others months to really get. Thats with three hours of professional attention per week, and to complete one new movement or technique. I'm not writing this to discourage you, but in the hopes that you'll realize what goes into building a stroke, and so you can have realistic expectations.

Helpful?

Rickson
03-30-2008, 06:53 AM
Well, my forehand sucks.

You're absolutely right about that! Too bad we're talking about 2 different things.

roddick89
03-30-2008, 07:08 AM
Personally, i think a western grip is just too awkward, have you tried a semi western? I think thats a gd compromise between topspin and flat balls, also i think that any level of player can use it. And swing fast, its raquet head speed that generates the natural topspin that does'nt come from the type of grip your using.
Good Luck

baselinerT
03-30-2008, 07:15 AM
Well, it doesn't have to look pretty, it just has to work. I'm not suggesting use bad technique but there are various ways to hit a forehand and don't forget the fundamentals.

SpinningForehand
03-30-2008, 07:36 AM
You're trying to do too much at once man. The human brain can literally only focus on one thing at a time, you mentioned three things that you're trying to accomplish all at the same time, and I know that there's more. It's not possible to take several new technique moves and make them all feel good together immediately unless you're really an amazing athlete.

So what you need to do, is take one thing at a time, or maybe two things at a time and get comfortable doing them. You're looking for a quick fix here, watch this video and this video.........and then just do it! Sorry man it's going to take more work. Take one element that you feel is good from one of those videos, get a ball machine, a hitting wall, or a friend and a bunch of tennis balls and do that one element over and over and over until you're able to do it without thinking about it. Please realize, this could take days, weeks, months. It's going to depend on how often you practice it, and how many repetitions.

When you're able to do the first element without thinking, go to the next and so on, building on top of what you're able to complete.

At the club I teach at, there are several guys that I see two or three times per week for private lessons, two of them for over two years now. Sometimes new technique changes come within a lesson or two, others will take several weeks at three privates per week, and still others months to really get. Thats with three hours of professional attention per week, and to complete one new movement or technique. I'm not writing this to discourage you, but in the hopes that you'll realize what goes into building a stroke, and so you can have realistic expectations.

Helpful?

Yeah, you are right, I kept trying to change my forehand all at once instead of dedicating time to changing each part. I should have realized it doesn't work like that. Thanks, this post helped a lot. I will just try practicing one thing for a long time until I get it right.

SpinningForehand
03-30-2008, 07:37 AM
I guess I will be posting a video soon hopefully.

Zachol82
03-30-2008, 07:42 AM
9/10 posts about "problems with forehand" that I've seen relates directly to footwork and stances. So I'm going to take a random guess here before you post your video just to see if I'm right.

If you're a righty, you should be stepping into the ball with your left leg, transfering all of your weight into your left foot before the moment of impact. The result is more power while using less energy as well as better balance and consistency.

Tennisplayer92
03-30-2008, 10:03 AM
are you confident while making strokes? a slight hesitation will cause an error :] just try this, when you warm up, barely hit it so it goes over. work on technique and increase velocity from there. my forehands are all voper at the ebginning of practice but when i get in the groove. theres no stopping it :]

paulfreda
03-30-2008, 08:11 PM
One thing about the Western grip is that it really can not be hit well swinging slowly. So at another tempo it will feel "like somethiing is wrong".
FWIW

CAM178
03-30-2008, 08:22 PM
Hope this helps, what I'm about to say.

During my tennis career, I have changed my FH stroke at least 8 times. And I mean completely re-engineering my FH stroke. Matter of fact, I just did it again about 2 mo ago. It's almost always due to either a wrist or elbow issue, but sometimes it's because my old stroke just wasn't working. What works for me is to tinker with it in my living room, then tinker with it against a wall starting off at low speed, and then eventually fine-tune it on the court against a person.

Don't fret, as most have to alter their strokes a bit over time. The ones that come to mind for me that were major alterations were at ages 14, 19, 27, & 35.

Your new FH stroke will blow away your old one. Trust me: once you blast that 1st FH winner with the new stroke, you will smile ear-to-ear. :mrgreen:

Vision84
03-30-2008, 08:40 PM
If you're a righty, you should be stepping into the ball with your left leg, transfering all of your weight into your left foot before the moment of impact. The result is more power while using less energy as well as better balance and consistency.

That is the classic way of hitting a forehand which is becoming outdated. Today is about angular momentum with a load an explode instead of the linear momentum.

Kuzarain
04-01-2008, 12:13 AM
yes, i've heard and seen most of the shots now (for a right hander) are done with the right foot in front, with the left when it's not possible with the former, correct?