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Hatari!
04-04-2008, 12:08 PM
I have an extremely flexible shoulder. That spot on your back that you can't scratch doesn't exist for me. In fact, when I did a flexibility test, my doctor marveled at the fact that I could clap my arms together behind my back, and pull them together so my palms were past my opposite hands' wrists.

Now, I did not come here brag about my flexibility. How do I take advantage of my shoulder? What shots can I enhance with my shoulder?

Penguin Slapper
04-04-2008, 12:11 PM
uh i can do the same exact thing and i never really thought it was that impressive. cant everybody do that? what are you talking about? is that really super flexible? is this some sort of joke? i guess you could always do an around the body kind of shot at the net if you wanted to...

mmeyer1
04-04-2008, 12:13 PM
dude I'm so envious of you seriously. You can take advantage of that flexibility on serves and overheads, and you should be able to generate a lot of pace on them.

Bungalo Bill
04-04-2008, 12:23 PM
I have an extremely flexible shoulder. That spot on your back that you can't scratch doesn't exist for me. In fact, when I did a flexibility test, my doctor marveled at the fact that I could clap my arms together behind my back, and pull them together so my palms were past my opposite hands' wrists.

Now, I did not come here brag about my flexibility. How do I take advantage of my shoulder? What shots can I enhance with my shoulder?

The serve will take most advantage of your flexibility. However, flexibility is not necessarily the same as relaxation.

For the serve, in order to take advantage of your flexibility, you will need to learn to relax. Especially in the shoulder/arm/hand area of the hitting arm. A deep "backscratch" (although I never liked the term) lengthens the distance for your racquet to travel and gain momentum. However, the serve is an entire motion you will have to learn.

In all strokes an element of relaxation is important to use your flexibility. Flexibility can translate into elasticity which is important for all strokes. Each stroke has a certain degree of relaxation/flexibility to execute fluidly.

watermantra
04-04-2008, 03:02 PM
The serve will take most advantage of your flexibility. However, flexibility is not necessarily the same as relaxation.

For the serve, in order to take advantage of your flexibility, you will need to learn to relax. Especially in the shoulder/arm/hand area of the hitting arm. A deep "backscratch" (although I never liked the term) lengthens the distance for your racquet to travel and gain momentum. However, the serve is an entire motion you will have to learn.

In all strokes an element of relaxation is important to use your flexibility. Flexibility can translate into elasticity which is important for all strokes. Each stroke has a certain degree of relaxation/flexibility to execute fluidly.

Agreed, and well put. I also don't like the "backscratch" term, as it implies that your racquet should drop to the center of your back. This does not happen with a loose (relaxed) arm. In fact, the term seems to make beginners try to force their racquet into this position, when in reality, a loosey-goosey arm will naturally fall to the right position with the turn up and into the toss.

I have shoulders that are so "flexible" that they can easily come out of socket. It is painless in my left shoulder, but when it happens in my right shoulder (probably because of the huge muscle imbalances thanks to Tennis!) it can be quite painful. The left shoulder moves in and out, and back in socket very easily, but the right sometimes gets a bit "stuck". My flexibility translated into some good pace on the serve, given my short height, but I wish I'd paid more attention to it as a younger player. If you are young, you might consider doing some rotator cuff strengthening exercises to help prevent any abnormal range of motion from harming you as you get older. Of course, who shouldn't do those?!!

Bungalo Bill
04-04-2008, 03:06 PM
Agreed, and well put. I also don't like the "backscratch" term, as it implies that your racquet should drop to the center of your back. This does not happen with a loose (relaxed) arm. In fact, the term seems to make beginners try to force their racquet into this position, when in reality, a loosey-goosey arm will naturally fall to the right position with the turn up and into the toss.

Hmmmm...I think you are the first person I have ever read supporting this. Yes, the racquet actually goes more over the hitting shoulder bs. the very center of the back. That shoulder needs to be able to move around in order to accomplish a deep "lay back".

I have shoulders that are so "flexible" that they can easily come out of socket.

:cry: sounds horrible.

It is painless in my left shoulder, but when it happens in my right shoulder (probably because of the huge muscle imbalances thanks to Tennis!) it can be quite painful. The left shoulder moves in and out, and back in socket very easily, but the right sometimes gets a bit "stuck". My flexibility translated into some good pace on the serve, given my short height, but I wish I'd paid more attention to it as a younger player. If you are young, you might consider doing some rotator cuff strengthening exercises to help prevent any abnormal range of motion from harming you as you get older. Of course, who shouldn't do those?!!

Ahhh, very good point. Something I am not qualifed to advise in. That would be a great tip and question probably in the health section. But good point.