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millenium
04-05-2008, 05:37 AM
Can someone please post the teaching progressions of the Forehand.

CoachingMastery
04-05-2008, 06:02 AM
While there will be many interpretations of what progression is best suited for each individual, there are steps you can do that will not stagnate you nor have you develop bad habits.

The first step is to understand the topspin forehand stroke. Study the forehand among the pros: use the various websites that offer video clips where you can look at each clip frame by frame. Identify "key position points" that all forehands have in common.

1. Establish a topspin grip. This is very diverse even among great players. Starting with an eastern forehand or semi-western (if it feels comfortable enouth) is fine. I start beginners with the eastern as it doesn't feel so strange. Depending on your personality and perceptions, most people will evolve their grip as they master the forehand without conscious thought.

2. Get the racquet back below the contact point. Notice I didn't say "loop" it back or get it all the way back early. The key here is to make sure you get it back below the contact point. Like the grip, any loop will evolve naturally for most players. Keep it simple at this point; I prefer a straight back backswing to get the feel of getting the racquet below the ball. I like to have players take the racquet to their right hip (for right-handers)

3. Buttcap of the racquet points to the ball.

4. Stance should be neutral as you first learn otherwise you will 'arm' the stroke. Open stances will be easier to learn after you have learned the proper swing path.

5. KEEP THE PLANE THE SAME. IE: don't roll the racquet face over the ball. Brush up in a natural driving lift of the forearm as the racquet's orientation to the forearm does not change.

6. Imagine driving the front top edge of the racquet up through the target line. This will help keep you from rolling or flipping the racquet.

7. Keep the wrist firm. While most shots don't require a deathgrip, it is important to maintain consistency of the swing with minimal wrist flexion.

8. Drive out towards the target then imagine you are wiping a window in front of you with your racquet and hand. This "wiper" move should maintain the plane of the racquet while allowing for good brushing action.

9. The hitting elbow should come up as you finish the stroke with your elbow pointing towards the target; the buttcap pointing towards the target, the back of the hitting hand finishing near your left cheek of your face.

10. Keep the back leg back. Common mistake among beginners is walking through the shot especially during contact. This ruins the integrity of the hips and pulls the racquet off the target line early.

There are many, many other tips that I'm sure will get posted here. However, if you develop a consistent, repetitive, reliable swing pattern, you then develop the ability to aim with consistency. If you learn to hit with quality spin first, you will automatically start hitting harder because you have greater error room and thus confidence to swing harder. Hitting flat first makes many players decelerate their swing and start to push the ball rather than stroke.

Bungalo Bill
04-05-2008, 07:00 AM
Can someone please post the teaching progressions of the Forehand.

There are different styles and ways to teach the forehand.

For me,

1. I emphasize the grips first. I do not put people anymore in the Eastern grip. I dont feel it is necessary. I start them right off in the SW. I have never had a problem. Partly, because the senses haven't been developed. I also feel the SW is a much better grip then the Eastern these days. I wont knock anyone using an Eastern but I think the benefits using a SW outweigh the Eastern. So why not begin that way.

2. I begin teaching the unit turn right away: This is very basic and isolated. I show them how the shoulders turn and how the racquet goes back at the same time. I have them do about 20 of these. Nothing major but I want to begin training the brain right away.

3. Footwork: I begin by showing them the step-out. This is a non-hitting ball drill. The step-out is incorporated from day one. My goal is to progress into other footwork patterns over time considering the indivduals capabilties.

4. The swing is very simple and broken down into 4 major reference points. I borrowed this view point from Yandells book because I think many good coaches make the swing so darn complicated. The brain just needs reference points and it fills in the blanks for the motion.

....1. The first is after the unit turn. The racquet goes up and is held by both the non-dominant arm and the hitting arm. The string bed is facing the right ear.

....2. The second position is the "pat the dog on the head position".

....3. The third position is a perpendicular racquet or sqaure racquet at the contact.

....4. The fourth is extension towards the target.

so I incorporate the major elements in the forehand. The shoulder turn, the step-out, the takeback, and the swing/followthrough. Obviously, we do this in repetition, shadow-tennis, using street cones (like T-ball), and other tools to incorporate it into one smooth motion.

Just make sure you dont make it rocket science. The forehand is the easiest stroke to teach. Also, dont be afraid to improvise. It is a myth to have a billion years of experience before you think you are a good coach.

Good players do not always make good coaches and good coaches are not always good players.

millenium
04-05-2008, 10:09 AM
Bungalo Bill, i do not understand these two positions :

....1. The first is after the unit turn. The racquet goes up and is held by both the non-dominant arm and the hitting arm. The string bed is facing the right ear.

....2. The second position is the "pat the dog on the head position".


Is there any pictures of these two positions?

Bungalo Bill
04-05-2008, 10:21 AM
Bungalo Bill, i do not understand these two positions :

....1. The first is after the unit turn. The racquet goes up and is held by both the non-dominant arm and the hitting arm. The string bed is facing the right ear.

....2. The second position is the "pat the dog on the head position".


Is there any pictures of these two positions?

Okay, take a look at this and see if it makes sense. Open this but dont press the button to start the video.


http://www.fuzzyyellowballs.com/index.php?id=410668&col=260821

If you bring this racquet down and put his non-dominant arm back on the throat of the racquet, in its strict form the strings will face the right ear. Now, keep in mind this swing has been set in motion. The initial training I provide is more static. Look at Safins first "still" when they are talking about getting his racquet back. His non-hitting hand is slightly released from the racquet. This is the first position but the non-hitting hand is still on the racquet. I do no agree with the racquet take back from the commentor as he was demonstrating it because he releases the non-hititng hand too soon from a lesson perspective.

Now, for the "pat-the-dog" on the head. And by the way, I happened to coin this when I was teaching my kids. I really dont have a better way of saying it, so if you can come up with one, let me know!

http://www.fuzzyyellowballs.com/index.php?id=410676&col=260821

In the above link. When he says "the racquet drops down" at that point is an example of the "dog pat on the head". Also he shows Safin from the side with his racquet down and back. I just have people raise and lower the head of the racquet from the wrist area as if they were patting a dog on the head on their strings to get the feel.

These reference points along with the others creates the outline of a professional level swing. It is a lot like flipping through a cartoon booklet. The faster you flip the pages the more motion you see. When people memorize those four points, and I must say EASY points, the brain fills in the blanks.

millenium
04-05-2008, 12:20 PM
Thanks for the explanation, just one question at the pat the dog position, must the strings of the hitting side face downwards?

lolsmash
04-05-2008, 02:13 PM
I also have a question. How should you be using your legs during the forehand. I appreciate if you can find pictures to show me some reference points. Btw good progression =]

Bungalo Bill
04-05-2008, 02:22 PM
Thanks for the explanation, just one question at the pat the dog position, must the strings of the hitting side face downwards?

Yes, get them in the SW grip. :) You are also training the forearm, etc.

When you are teaching, you need to learn how the brain works in training psycho-motor skills. You are always developing the brain to take in information, handle new stresses, and execute proper muscle movement.

When I type my tips, I am always thinking about the players brain and how it works. Then I provide the information it needs to process. Hope that helps.

Bungalo Bill
04-05-2008, 02:30 PM
I also have a question. How should you be using your legs during the forehand. I appreciate if you can find pictures to show me some reference points. Btw good progression =]

When you have bent knees and the racquet gets lower then the incoming ball in the lowest part of your backswing, the forward swing will now begin to go upward (low to high) to the ball and is complimented by a rising center of gravity (your butt). This lift helps provide topspin and heaviness to the ball.

This is not jumping so dont jump. It is simply a natural rise that happens when you are bringing your racquet up to contact from bent knees.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PbsQ8gZLWyc&feature=related

millenium
04-05-2008, 10:44 PM
Thanks Bungalo Bill, just one question on the unit turn.

....1. The first is after the unit turn. The racquet goes up and is held by both the non-dominant arm and the hitting arm. The string bed is facing the right ear.

I thought the above number 1 is the unit turn but you say this is after the unit turn, so how is the unit turn?

Ash_Smith
04-06-2008, 01:10 AM
RPT teaching progressions for the forehand...

http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/hh157/AceOnTheLine/fh_progressions_1.jpg

http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/hh157/AceOnTheLine/fh_progressions_2.jpg

Solat
04-06-2008, 06:02 PM
me thinks that may not be the correct order to hit a FH:???:

Bungalo Bill
04-06-2008, 06:26 PM
RPT teaching progressions for the forehand...

http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/hh157/AceOnTheLine/fh_progressions_1.jpg

http://i255.photobucket.com/albums/hh157/AceOnTheLine/fh_progressions_2.jpg

This is perfect to use. Kind of weird order though. I can use this for my suggestions as an illustration.

1. Preparation #7: Position #1 for me. This is the one that I mentioned that the string bed faces the ear.

2. Rotation Stage #5: Position #2 for me. This is very close to the "pat-the-dog on the head" position.

3. Contact Position #1: Position #3 for me. This is the contact point where the racquet is perpedicular and square. However, the student is not jumping like the picture shows.

4.Extension #2: Position #4 for me. This is extension.

All the other photos, the brain fills in the blanks.

Mahboob Khan
04-06-2008, 06:37 PM
I see some great people such as Bungalo Bill who have posted here. I will build on, if I may. This advice is for right-handed players. Lefty may reverse it.

Grip: Semi western is preferred (the base knuckle of the index finger on panel 4); however, if someone is uncomfortable with SW then Eastern is OK (the base knuckle of the index finger on panel 3, the side panel).

Ready Position: If you are double-handed on BH side, then your left hand is on the handle also. If you are 1-handed on the BH side, then your left hand is on the throat of the racket, racket is held outfront waist-height inbetween your eyes inline with your nose; feet are shoulder width apart facing net.

Turn and Step Position: On complete turn, the feet are in one line: left foot at 12, right foot at 6 o'clock positions (in other words you step toward the net), left shoulder at 12, right shoulder at 6 o'clock positions, the left arm also goes back as if it is handcuffed with right arm, the hitting arm is bent, the hitting elbow bone points to ground, the tip of the racket is above your wrist, the racket head is as high as your head.

Forward Swing: The racket descends, moves forward, comes under the ball .. maybe 1 foot below the level of the approaching ball, it will move forward such so that contact is made out in front ..

Point of Contact: The contact is made out in front on top of the bounce .. when the ball is not going up not going down .. the racket head is vertical at contact .. the arm-racket moves forward-upward, the upper body continues to open to the net.

Follow-through: The racket finishes over your left shoulder, the upper body has come around such that your right shoulder is now at 12, left at 6 o'clock positions.. the shoulders have replaced each other i.e. the hitting shoulder has replaced the non-hitting shoulder.

I hope it helps.

Mahboob Khan

JCo872
04-06-2008, 08:50 PM
Bungalo Bill, i do not understand these two positions :

....1. The first is after the unit turn. The racquet goes up and is held by both the non-dominant arm and the hitting arm. The string bed is facing the right ear.

....2. The second position is the "pat the dog on the head position".


Is there any pictures of these two positions?

Here is a good picture that shows both:

http://www.hi-techtennis.com/forehand/images/patdog.jpg (http://www.hi-techtennis.com/forehand/images/patdog.jpg)

I teach "pat the dog" as a core motion when teaching the forehand - it's a real gem from BB.

Bungalo Bill
04-06-2008, 08:54 PM
Here is a good picture that shows both:

http://www.hi-techtennis.com/forehand/images/patdog.jpg (http://www.hi-techtennis.com/forehand/images/patdog.jpg)

Perfect! How are you JC? Everything fine? Am I still a member of your site? I dont remember if I was or wasnt?????? Anyway, good to hear form you.

JCo872
04-06-2008, 08:56 PM
Perfect! How are you JC? Everything fine? Am I still a member of your site? I dont remember if I was or wasnt?????? Anyway, good to hear form you.

Hey send me an email and I'll shoot you a username and password. I'm doing great. I'm going to Davis Cup this weekend when they take on France...

Bungalo Bill
04-06-2008, 09:09 PM
Hey send me an email and I'll shoot you a username and password. I'm doing great. I'm going to Davis Cup this weekend when they take on France...

Go USA! Cream those Frenchys! Okay, I will. Thanks.

millenium
04-06-2008, 11:11 PM
Thanks for the help guys, great pictures ....1. The first is after the unit turn. The racquet goes up and is held by both the non-dominant arm and the hitting arm. The string bed is facing the right ear.

....2. The second position is the "pat the dog on the head position


Just a question on number 1, so if this position is after the unit turn, then how does the unit turn look like? Is it just turning your shoulders sideways with the racket still in front of you???

Ash_Smith
04-07-2008, 08:19 AM
me thinks that may not be the correct order to hit a FH:???:

Well spotted!!!

We teach from the contact point forewards and then add the preparation and backswing. The theory being that the contact point is the most important bit!!! Therefore this is the order we teach the progressions - not the order to hit!!!

Bungalo Bill
04-07-2008, 08:35 AM
Thanks for the help guys, great pictures ....1. The first is after the unit turn. The racquet goes up and is held by both the non-dominant arm and the hitting arm. The string bed is facing the right ear.

....2. The second position is the "pat the dog on the head position


Just a question on number 1, so if this position is after the unit turn, then how does the unit turn look like? Is it just turning your shoulders sideways with the racket still in front of you???

It is just turning the shoulders and showing how the racquet goes back with the turn like this:

http://www.fuzzyyellowballs.com/index.php?id=410663&col=260821

Obviously, with beginners you will not have them be this active. But you get the idea. Think building blocks.