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Yolkl
01-07-2005, 06:08 AM
have not settled down, but have switched to LM Radicals since the summer.
Is this a better choice for an aging 3.5 than say the VE Tour 10 MP or the RDX 500 MP ? Despite playing at least 3 times a week, my game to be quite honest, stinks. No consistency whatsoever. Can a racquet help or is it all up to the operator.

BLiND
01-07-2005, 06:33 AM
Its all about getting the right racquet for the type of player you are... it is the oporator, but if you play with a racquet thats simply too heavy, or to light for you... your never going to get anywhere.

Mies
01-07-2005, 06:34 AM
A mighty fine control racket in the hands of someone who has an inconsistent and/or faulty technique will not make the player a lot better. The other way around is also valid (I believe): a 5.5 wielding a granny stick would still be able to woop 4.0 players.

Those extremes put aside, the racket can certainly matter, but don't expect miracles. I can put myself up as an example. I am a tall (1.95 mtrs) guy with long, loopy and fast strokes. I was wielding a 265 gram (unstrung), 102 sq inch, carbon/titanium, long bodied paddle. It was very stiff and quite powerfull. I had to string it very tight in order to keep the power somewhat under control. I had a very extreme more-than-western-grip so I could use lots of spin to keep the ball in the court, a very risky and often errant shot. Also, the racket felt like a damn wooden board. No feel whatsoever.

So, at one point when I was playing a singles match vs. one of the better gravel players in my club (heavy topspin baseliner), I realized that this was not working. I decided to start demoing heavier sticks, being sceptical about whether I could handle the mass. To my surprise (well back then) I found that I could handle "player frames" quite easily without tiring myself out. I played the last half of the season using a LM prestige MP with much better results. I let the mass of the racket do a bit more of the work and I have a lot more control over my shots (mostly my forehand, since I also changed forehand grips to semi-western). Also, since rackets in this category are are often more flexible, I am enjoying a lot more comfort when hitting a ball.

I would say switching rackets to a different category has made me a slightly better player. I did not gain any new shots or anything spectacular like that, but the lower power lvls of the "player" rackets gave me more confidence: I am no long worrying about hitting balls long when putting away balls from the midcourt. And the comfort lvl has increased tremendously. Then again, going from a lightweight, stiff tweener to a flexy, 60-70 grams heavier player racket is quite big a change, so the results will probably be more obvious than someone switching frames in the same category of rackets.

Of course, everybody has their preferences etc., I'd say, start demoing and find your own "holy grail" :)....

Anyways, I hope I dind't bore the crap out of you with this story :)....no-one is really waiting on an piece of proza from a mediocre tennis player :). Anyways, hope it helped.

Regards

Yolkl
01-07-2005, 07:35 AM
Mies

Thanks for the input. There was nothing mediocre about your post.
I am also tall & used a longbody for awhile figuring it matched my height better than a regular 27" stick but gave up on it. I think it breeds inconsistency for someone who is already inconsistent.

I demoed the VE Tour 10 MP three months ago and loved it, but then hit with a LM radical the other night and it felt good enough for me to question my first choice. The yonex RDX 500 MP is another one I'd like to try, but I'm not
sure my game warrants these player sticks.

Ronaldo
01-07-2005, 10:29 AM
Yolkl, what racquet did you use before switching?

Yolkl
01-07-2005, 11:08 AM
The longbody was a Head Tour Xtra Long. My interim racquet is an old one, prince precision graphite. Before those two, I hit with a Warrior mid which in retospect was a much better racquet for me, just a little too sluggish. In addition to playing crummy, the Head took its toll on my arm, so I want something that absorbs more shock.

Tomek_Pl
01-07-2005, 11:09 AM
I play with LM Prestige MP and when I tested RDX 500 MP I found it to be... to easy lol It felt like a toy in my hands. Not like PureDrive maybe... It's realy not that hard, but very stable and for sure not harder than LM Radical MP (I had one). Now I'm going to test it one more time with some lead tape and other string.
Give it a test!

Gaines Hillix
01-07-2005, 11:30 AM
A mighty fine control racket in the hands of someone who has an inconsistent and/or faulty technique will not make the player a lot better. The other way around is also valid (I believe): a 5.5 wielding a granny stick would still be able to woop 4.0 players.

Those extremes put aside, the racket can certainly matter, but don't expect miracles. I can put myself up as an example. I am a tall (1.95 mtrs) guy with long, loopy and fast strokes. I was wielding a 265 gram (unstrung), 102 sq inch, carbon/titanium, long bodied paddle. It was very stiff and quite powerfull. I had to string it very tight in order to keep the power somewhat under control. I had a very extreme more-than-western-grip so I could use lots of spin to keep the ball in the court, a very risky and often errant shot. Also, the racket felt like a damn wooden board. No feel whatsoever.

So, at one point when I was playing a singles match vs. one of the better gravel players in my club (heavy topspin baseliner), I realized that this was not working. I decided to start demoing heavier sticks, being sceptical about whether I could handle the mass. To my surprise (well back then) I found that I could handle "player frames" quite easily without tiring myself out. I played the last half of the season using a LM prestige MP with much better results. I let the mass of the racket do a bit more of the work and I have a lot more control over my shots (mostly my forehand, since I also changed forehand grips to semi-western). Also, since rackets in this category are are often more flexible, I am enjoying a lot more comfort when hitting a ball.

I would say switching rackets to a different category has made me a slightly better player. I did not gain any new shots or anything spectacular like that, but the lower power lvls of the "player" rackets gave me more confidence: I am no long worrying about hitting balls long when putting away balls from the midcourt. And the comfort lvl has increased tremendously. Then again, going from a lightweight, stiff tweener to a flexy, 60-70 grams heavier player racket is quite big a change, so the results will probably be more obvious than someone switching frames in the same category of rackets.

Of course, everybody has their preferences etc., I'd say, start demoing and find your own "holy grail" :)....

Anyways, I hope I dind't bore the crap out of you with this story :)....no-one is really waiting on an piece of proza from a mediocre tennis player :). Anyways, hope it helped.

Regards

Mies' experience is very similar to mine. I had to find a racquet that would let me play as well as I can, but there's no replacement for working on one's skills and technique. I finally realized I needed to work on finding the weight range that fit my game best. My timing was off if the frame was too light or heavy. I found I could consistently swing frames in the 11-11.5 oz. range at the pace most typical of the level of play I'm at(4.0) . My rule of thumb is to play with the heaviest frame I can realistically use. Beyond that, it's technique, skill and conditioning that matter most, IMO.

Yolkl
01-07-2005, 12:04 PM
GH Using weight to narrow down the field sounds like a good idea.
Here are the possibilities-all MP:
*VE Tour 10
Volkl Tour 10
*LM Radical
LM Prestige
RDX 500

If I don't decide soon, I may also consider the Volkl Gen II
*demoed

The question is which of these racquets will lend itself to a more consistent stroke for an admitted hacker. I'm taking a few lessons, playing frequently, and working on conditioning but my game is not responding.
Should I be looking at an OS ?

AndrewD
01-07-2005, 12:26 PM
Yolkl, Im somewhat in the same boat as yourself although am a 3.5 playing for around 5 years and looking to move up a notch or two. I tried out the LM Radical MP and found it to be a lovely all round racquet, great for groundstrokes (although not slice), with nice touch and wonderful control. Not too much on the serve and a little too much at net (for me) but quite nice all up. Unfortunately it was way too pricey here in Australia but might be a reasonable choice regardless.

Check out the comparison reviews for some different perspectives as well. They've got a run-down on the LM Prestige as well as the Radical and a Wilson or two that matches up nicely.

Personally I felt the LM Rad to be a much better frame than the LM Prestige. Just a lot more feel, comfort and playability. Didn't like the Volkl at all but Im probably in the minority there, most seem to love the Tour 10 but in the MP model.

I'd also suggest, if you'd like to move up from 3.5 to demo some frames against better players. I often find that a racquet which works well against someone of my level or lower just isnt solid enough against a better player.

Good luck and let us know what you think, I'll be curious to hear

Gaines Hillix
01-07-2005, 01:59 PM
GH Using weight to narrow down the field sounds like a good idea.
Here are the possibilities-all MP:
*VE Tour 10
Volkl Tour 10
*LM Radical
LM Prestige
RDX 500

If I don't decide soon, I may also consider the Volkl Gen II
*demoed

The question is which of these racquets will lend itself to a more consistent stroke for an admitted hacker. I'm taking a few lessons, playing frequently, and working on conditioning but my game is not responding.
Should I be looking at an OS ?

Yolkl, these are all great frames. Here's the dilema. They are all designed for accomplished players or those players who are seriously aspiring to a higher level. They can be very frustrating for mere mortals like me, but if you stick with them long enough and work hard you'll be rewarded. I've realized at my age and with the amount of time I have to take lessons, practice, etc. I'm not going to get any better, so I'm using a PK Laver S, which sort of stradles the line between a tweener and a players frame. Of those you have in your list the LM Radical is probably a little less demanding because it's lighter. The MP version has an 18X20 pattern though, so spin and power are going to be at a premium. The RDX 500 MP is getting good comments on here. It's easy swinging because of its lower swingweight, but it should have good power and spin with its 16X19 pattern and 11.7 oz. weight. The mid version is pretty demanding. There are many Volkl Tour 10 MP fans on here too. It's a little heavier to swing than the Yonex. NoBadMojo is a big fan of these.

Yolkl
01-08-2005, 07:02 AM
GH- I hear what you are saying and envy your wisdom. Unfortunately, I'm too stubborn to admit that 3.5 is the top floor in my building, but I'm pretty sure the elevator will stop at 4, if I can get there.

With that in mind, its probably foolish to consider a racquet designed for a 4.5 and up player unless it is remarkably forgiving. If consitency is a major issue, it sounds like the VE 10 isn't the best choice either.

So, with that in mind perhaps I shold be considering your racquet, the LM radical and what else ? I still want to try the RDX 500, but maybe the 300 would be better.

Gaines Hillix
01-08-2005, 07:45 AM
yolkl, I'd suggest demoing the PK Laver S, the RDX500 MP and the Volkl Tour 10 MP(not the VE) and the RDX300 MP. I assume you can get demoes where you live or if in the states you can order them from TW basically for the cost of the two way shipping. A bonus of using the lighter PK Laver S or RDX300 is that you can easily customize them with lead tape if you improve your game and need more weight to handle faster pace. You might want to consider where your normal stroke has you hitting the ball on the racquet face. The RDX300 MP, Volkl Tour 10, PK Laver S are a bit stiffer in the upper hoop, which effectively raises the sweetspot. If the ball fuzz on your current frame is at the center or higher part of the stringbed, those would be the ones to focus on.

Yolkl
01-08-2005, 08:33 AM
GH The ball fuzz tends to be on the frame itself. Just kidding.
Rather than buying 2 or 3 of the same stick, why not buy 2 or 3
fairly similiar frames and decide which to use based on whether you are playing singles or doubles, the surface and how you are hitting that day ?
Lord knows, I sure don't hit the way every day. Seems like you could also add some variety to your game by switching racquets between sets.

Of course this probably won't help one's consistency, but it would be fun.

Gaines Hillix
01-08-2005, 10:04 AM
GH The ball fuzz tends to be on the frame itself. Just kidding.
Rather than buying 2 or 3 of the same stick, why not buy 2 or 3
fairly similiar frames and decide which to use based on whether you are playing singles or doubles, the surface and how you are hitting that day ?
Lord knows, I sure don't hit the way every day. Seems like you could also add some variety to your game by switching racquets between sets.

Of course this probably won't help one's consistency, but it would be fun.

Yolkl, I carry two or three different types of frames with me all the time. I never buy a frame or frames without demoing them first though!

drumnman2
01-08-2005, 05:17 PM
I don't see much about them on here but the Yonex RDX 300 is great in my opinion. I am only 3.0-3.5 also & have tried some of the popular player frames in an attempt to up grade from LM 4 (too much power). LM Prestige MP, Wilson n 6.1, Yonex RDX 500 MP, LM Radical. I strung my 300 with Lux Big Banger Ace 18 @ 58, added a little lead in the throat & am very happy with it. The 500 just doesn't have the feel for me even though I had it strung with Babolat VS Touch nat. gut to try & get more feel.

Yolkl
01-08-2005, 05:56 PM
Drum-It's hard not to get caught up in the advanced player chatter here. It's almost like dropping down to a notch is like throwing in the towell on being a good player. For me, a 300 or a VE tour 8 probably makes more sense than their big brothers. Glad to hear that you like the 300.