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Bungalo Bill
04-11-2008, 01:53 PM
THE FIVE ZONES

Simply defined, the tennis court is merely a playing area that both defines the boundaries of play and governs the actions of those who play. The white lines that divide the court into various sections serve the purpose of determining whether a ball is on or out of play.

Yet, “beyond” these boundaries our research suggests that there are five distinct areas on a tennis court aside from the defined white-lined boundaries that correspond with actual decision making during play. It is with these areas that you should concern yourself during play.

We have labeled these locations the 5 Zones and, within the boundaries of each. You must be acutely aware of where both of you and your opponent are at any given time. These zones are indicators of the tactical and technical options that are appropriate to produce the best possible shot in any situation that exists during play.

(Zone 5 is deep behind the baseline to behind the baseline. Zone 4 is from the baseline to Zone 5 for normal baseline play. Zone 3 is from the baseline to no-mans land. Zone 3 is from no-mans land to the middle of the service box. Zone 1 is the net to the middle of the service box.)

It is also important that you realize how these zones relate to one another.

Your location on the court when you receive a ball, rather than where the ball bounces, is the factor that determines which zone you are in. The 5 Zones are the building blocks of the 5 Keys concept.

Three zones are associated with the “baseline” areas. Zones 3, 4 and 5. Traditionally, the baseline area has been thought of as a location unto itself. In contrast, the 5 keys concept designates three distinct zones near the baseline, each of which presents its own set of tactical and technical choices.

Control Rating Test

1. Select a hitting partner of equal or slightly greater ability.*

2. Divide the court in half lengthwise, and include the alleys.

3. Begin a baseline rally from Zone 4.

4. Begin to time the rally for a duration of 15 seconds starting when the first ball is hit.

5. During the 15-second rally, hit each of your shots (ideally an even mix of backhands and forehands) into the predetermined half of the court. Your hitting partner must also return each ball within this half of the court. The object is not to test your mobility, but to access your ability to consistently control the ball within a defined area.

6. It is imperative that the ball speed remains at a relatively constant pace for the full 15 seconds.

7. Do not attempt to hit the ball as hard as you can, but rather to control the ball as well as you can. If any ball during the rally goes long, wide, into the net, or if you must move out of Zone 4 at any time, the rally must be restarted and the time reset.

8. The number of times you are able to hit the ball over the net during the 15 second period is your control rating.

9. This test must be successfully completed at least seven times before an accurate control rating can be determined.

10. To determine your control rating number, divide the total of your seven best scores by seven. For example, if your scores are 9, 8, 9, 9, 9, 8 and 9, divide your total 61 by seven to get a control rating of 8.7.

* The control rating can be taken with a teaching pro, or by using a ball machine.

The following table presents the standard level of play that corresponds to the control rating number achieved:

Control Rating/Standard Level of Play

13 to 15/World Class

11 to 12/Advanced Tournament

9 to 10/Advanced

7 to 8/Intermediate

If initial rallies prove unsuccessful, slow down the pace of the exchanges until you are able to successfully complete the seven 15-second durations. If you are unable to complete seven out of your first 10 tests, keep trying until you achieve 70 percent success.

Players who are unable to keep a rally going, or who fail to get more than six shots over the net during a 15-second duration, should move into Zone 3 and try for a control rating of 8. If that proves unsuccessful, players move into Zone 2 and try for a control rating of 9, or Zone 1, for a control rating of 10.

The following table presents the standard level of play that corresponds to the control rating that must be achieved from Zones 3, 2, 1.

Control Rating/Zone/Standard Level of Play

8/3/Advanced Beginner

9/2/Intermediate Beginner

10/1/Beginner

Next up is Key 2 - The 5 Phases of Play

Mansewerz
04-11-2008, 05:07 PM
Yo, for the zones you skipped zone 2. It went from 3 to 1.

10ispro
04-11-2008, 07:13 PM
System 5 is one thing which i seldom see taught which makes a world of difference to simplify the decision making process for players, which then translates to better execution.

Its been around for awhile. I think Brett 1st presented it in the mid 80s, but its still a concept I seldom see taught

The Key is understanding how where you receive the ball, directly affects how you should send the ball. Typical american junior tennis is hit the crap out of the ball regardless of what mode of play you are in and what zone you are in.
There is a major over emphasis on sending skills, and not receiving skills. Receiving precedes sending, so logically it should be taught 1st, but majority of Pros teach how to send 1st.


anyways,Bill Thanks for taking the time to post System 5 I am sure it will benefit many of the readers who do not know it

BeHappy
04-11-2008, 07:25 PM
deja vu anyone lol ;)


This is hilarious!

4 years later you laboriously type the whole thing out again! lol

Duzza
04-12-2008, 06:49 AM
deja vu anyone lol ;)


This is hilarious!

4 years later you laboriously type the whole thing out again! lol

Wouldn't he have just copy/pasted? If he bumped his 2004 thread people would probably flame him for "bringing up unrelated, old articles" :D

uspta mp
04-13-2008, 11:22 AM
the ITF has something going like this too. very technical that some of you regular guys might not be able to understand it.

Bungalo Bill
04-13-2008, 11:25 AM
Wouldn't he have just copy/pasted? If he bumped his 2004 thread people would probably flame him for "bringing up unrelated, old articles" :D

Thanks Duzza, that is exactly what I did. It cracked me up seeing that BeHappy thought I retyped the thing when copy and paste does the trick.

Bungalo Bill
04-13-2008, 11:27 AM
the ITF has something going like this too. very technical that some of you regular guys might not be able to understand it.

This is not that hard to understand!!!!!! Sure we are missing some pictures to add clarity, however, System 5 is not going to be something were you adopt the whole thing. There are things to learn, things to learn and leave out, and things to learn and incorporate in one's game. Some of it is very practical and some of it more theory.

uspta mp
04-13-2008, 11:29 AM
agreed, but i should have said a newbie in tennis might not be able to understand.

Bungalo Bill
04-13-2008, 11:31 AM
agreed, but i should have said a newbie in tennis might not be able to understand.

I wouldnt give a newbie System 5. They are not even there yet. I would introduce this to 3.5 and above. Or maybe an aspiring 3.0 player.

uspta mp
04-13-2008, 11:34 AM
i'm getting old. too old for this technical stuff. i liked it during the days when it was simple to teach.

Bungalo Bill
04-13-2008, 11:37 AM
i'm getting old. too old for this technical stuff. i liked it during the days when it was simple to teach.

Well, I cant argue with you on that one.

uspta mp
04-13-2008, 11:39 AM
so why the move to boise from so cal?

Bungalo Bill
04-13-2008, 11:46 AM
so why the move to boise from so cal?

My children and wife.

We raise a deaf child (my son) along with two daughters. When we were in So. Cal., taking care of his needs was draining on my wife and myself. We also wanted more room for our kids to run around and less commercializm distracting them.

My wife would come home exhausted from having to drive my son to LA and back to Mission Viejo every week day. Even with the car pool lane it was draining. Couple that with Doctors appointments, therapy, and other things and our life was insane.

We came to the Boise area and stayed at a friends house just ourside of Boise. It is beautiful here. Our son turned the corner and was now ready to be mainstreamed into regular schools. The school is a half-mile away and we bought a large home that will last us till the kids go to college.

Commercialism distractions are way lower and it just made sense for us. I was already playing a lot less tennis in So. Cal. However, I am picking up the racquet again since we have settled down. My game is way off right now and need to get back in shape and my timing back.

I am trying to get Yandell up here to do some fishing.

uspta mp
04-13-2008, 11:49 AM
i heard everyone is moving to idaho after the state offered big corporations attractive tax breaks to move there. i'm thinking of buying property with some acreage (for obvious reasons) over there at some point.

Bungalo Bill
04-13-2008, 11:59 AM
i heard everyone is moving to idaho after the state offered big corporations attractive tax breaks to move there. i'm thinking of buying property with some acreage (for obvious reasons) over there at some point.

Well if you are serious about the property purchase let me know there are some good places to buy. I am trying to get my brother to do the same, however, he just got laid-off. He was a branch manager in the mortgage industry.

TenniseaWilliams
04-13-2008, 12:31 PM
Nice posts BB. Thanks also to everyone who kept these threads bumped until I saw them. :)

I took the liberty of posting links to the system 5 threads in the "post links to useful threads" sticky.

Grouchy or not, I think we all appreciate the info! THANK YOU

Bungalo Bill
04-13-2008, 12:35 PM
Nice posts BB. Thanks also to everyone who kept these threads bumped until I saw them. :)

I took the liberty of posting links to the system 5 threads in the "post links to useful threads" sticky.

Grouchy or not, I think we all appreciate the info! THANK YOU

Okay, great! Thanks!