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Micky
04-11-2008, 09:42 PM
Today I found out that my racquets were being strung differently by the owner of the proshop and by the employee. I found out that the owner used to add four pounds in the last pull to make the last knot. The employee used only one pound.

I went crazy to say the least. The owner of the shop restrung both my racquets for free. Now I want to know what is the correct way of doing it. Do I let them use four pounds or one or what is the suggested pro way?

samster
04-11-2008, 09:44 PM
the last pull people usually go up by 5-8 pounds. the issue here is consistency, not the final increment increase.

Micky
04-11-2008, 09:50 PM
the last pull people usually go up by 5-8 pounds. the issue here is consistency, not the final increment increase.

Hola samster. Great point. Consistency is what I asked for today as well. I have been testing new strings in my racquet and it was the owner who did the initial stringings. Then after I broke my strings (and really loved that setup) the owner let the employee do the stringing. I went ballistic in the tennis court last night, nothing worked. I even hurt my shoulder. I could not understand what had happened. But my racquet felt really soft. Then I was told to look into the stringing part and I said "aha". I confronted the owner and the employee today and found out their differences.

dancraig
04-11-2008, 09:54 PM
They are just trying to add a few pounds to make up for any tension lost on the last pull. A little can be lost because the length of string between the clamp and the knot will not be tensioned.
I agree with samster, the main concern in consistency.

Micky
04-11-2008, 10:02 PM
They are just trying to add a few pounds to make up for any tension lost on the last pull. A little can be lost because the length of string between the clamp and the knot will not be tensioned.
I agree with samster, the main concern in consistency.

Thank you sir.

dancraig
04-11-2008, 10:03 PM
I don't add any tension, unless it's requested. That last cross is shorter than the other strings anyway.

themitchmann
04-12-2008, 03:43 AM
Yes, consistency is crucial. I can't imagine the softer stringbed was a result of the last pull. More than likely, it was the result of a different stringer stringing your racquet. Some stringers develop good habits that prevent tension loss, resulting in a tighter stringbed. Perhaps the employee has not developed these yet.

Valjean
04-12-2008, 11:20 AM
Reproducing good results is what any good shop is known to do. Yet few seem to actually control for it, and want you to know when it's done. Obtain one of several inexpensive tension measuring devices out now and record the stringbed when it's first done, when it plays best and when it's finished. And, since you're having a problem, take care to see that the same person strings your racquet on the same machine each time. In the end you could wind up thinking you need to start stringing yourself, which is how most got started too...

Micky
04-12-2008, 01:19 PM
Thank you gentlemen for excellent replies.

doriancito
06-30-2008, 12:11 PM
micky ! what you need is a better arm ! and the pain in the elbow was because of playing against me ! lol

YULitle
06-30-2008, 02:05 PM
Consistency is definitely the key. They should've been stringing it the same person to person.

That being said, you definitely over-reacted.... unless you play ATP. Even then.

Stan
06-30-2008, 02:18 PM
Yes, consistency is crucial. I can't imagine the softer stringbed was a result of the last pull. More than likely, it was the result of a different stringer stringing your racquet. Some stringers develop good habits that prevent tension loss, resulting in a tighter stringbed. Perhaps the employee has not developed these yet.

The Mitchman is 100% dead on. Most likely the difference you experienced was from the differing stringing techniques of the two different stringers. Adding 1 or 4 pounds to the tie-off is really not the issue (although consistency is important). In reality the last cross is not going to see much action and with the friction of the grommets it's not likely that the stringbed will suffer.

Keep in mind that two different stringers, using the same machine, with the same racquet and string at the same tension are likely to produce different stringbed stiffnesses...especially if their level of experience is not comparable.

So, in the future make sure to ask for a specific stringer when leaving your racquet, even if it means it will take another day or two. This way your racquet should perform the same as previous stringings (assuming the stringer is professional and consistent). I do believe you had every right to ask for a restringing, especially since the racquet played so differently for you. As for "going crazy" I would say that type of reaction is a bit over the top.

aussie
07-01-2008, 05:31 AM
I think you did very well to get the owner to restring your sticks free. A few stringing pros I know from years ago here in Brisbane would have told you, well lets just say it wouldn't be a pleasant use for a tennis racquet.

Yes, consistency in our stringing techniques is what we all strive for, and I confess there have been times when I have added 8lbs to the last mains and the last cross to offset tension loss when tying off. I don't any more, because it makes no difference to the playability of the string bed whether those last strings suffer some tension loss.

Blade0324
07-01-2008, 07:42 AM
As others have said, consistancy, consistancy, consistancy. I personally do increase tension on the last 2 mains and last cross by 3 lb. to compensate for and possible loss. That said I do this on every racquet every time. Back to that consistancy thing.

NoBadMojo
07-01-2008, 07:54 AM
Today I found out that my racquets were being strung differently by the owner of the proshop and by the employee. I found out that the owner used to add four pounds in the last pull to make the last knot. The employee used only one pound.

I went crazy to say the least. The owner of the shop restrung both my racquets for free. Now I want to know what is the correct way of doing it. Do I let them use four pounds or one or what is the suggested pro way?

No offense, but I have no idea why you would go crazy about something like this. It doesnt matter what tension you pull the last string at as long as you pull it with some reasonable tension, and I dont think you specified that you wanted a specific stringer to string your racquets. It was good of the store to compensate you the way they did...guess they didnt want a hassle. I dont add any tension to the last pull. If anything adding more to it theoretically makes for a worse stringjob <think proportional stringing>. The only reason some stringers make the last pull tighter is for some reason, the first thing many people feel the need to do is to check for movement on the last strings...if easy to move with their fingers, they somehow declare the stringjob as crappy which is absurd..so some stringers jack up the tension.

Did you honestly notice a difference in the stringjobs assuming you were using the same string at the same tension?

Schwiz
07-01-2008, 08:58 AM
I agree that if you indeed "went crazy" then you probably over reacted. I have been on the receiving end of a verbal **** by many irate customers that are looking for an excuse to why they played bad. Consistency is most definitely key in the world of stringing tennis rackets, but when they say that they mean more in the technique of stringing (for example one stringer may straighten the string on every pull as it is being pulled). I am not sure of you relationship with the shop but if it were me, unless I had already strung 3-4 frames for you previously I would have laughed in your face and told you to go buy a stringing machine.

Take into account that my response is based totally on the assumption that you "went crazy to say the least" on the shop owner about the fact you found out the last pull was changed by a slightly different tension.

YULitle
07-01-2008, 09:15 AM
The only reason some stringers make the last pull tighter is for some reason, the first thing many people feel the need to do is to check for movement on the last strings...if easy to move with their fingers, they somehow declare the stringjob as crappy which is absurd..so some stringers jack up the tension.

Amen brotha!

atomicx
07-01-2008, 12:22 PM
Hola samster. Great point. Consistency is what I asked for today as well. I have been testing new strings in my racquet and it was the owner who did the initial stringings. Then after I broke my strings (and really loved that setup) the owner let the employee do the stringing. I went ballistic in the tennis court last night, nothing worked. I even hurt my shoulder. I could not understand what had happened. But my racquet felt really soft. Then I was told to look into the stringing part and I said "aha". I confronted the owner and the employee today and found out their differences.

Seriously, I think you over-reacted quite a bit. First of all, a 3 lbs. difference in tension on the final pull from your last setup is not going to be the cause of shoulder problems. Nor was it the cause of your bad night of tennis. The whole idea is ridiculous.

Ljubicic for number1
07-01-2008, 06:24 PM
Ahh the poor old stringer gets the blame for a bad day on court once again. sad.

ambro
07-01-2008, 06:49 PM
Yeah that's why I like stringing my own, because I don't have a stringer to blame a bad day on. I just go directly to the string manufacturer, because it must be a defective set. :)

Ljubicic for number1
07-02-2008, 10:30 AM
Yeah that's why I like stringing my own, because I don't have a stringer to blame a bad day on. I just go directly to the string manufacturer, because it must be a defective set. :)


lol yeah I hate it when I play table tennis and can't blame the strings too.