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View Full Version : I finally learned the backhand slice


ogruskie
04-13-2008, 07:39 PM
And I feel a lot more confident with my game now.

I would typically use a forehand stroke and a backhand stroke with occasional volleys. But for the most part, only forehand and backhand strokes. My game was very limited and predictable.

But now that I have the backhand slice, OMG. So much SELECTION with what to do! I can smash a backhand, OR I can take pace off the ball and make the opponent run from his comfort zone of the baseline into the service box, where I can get past him and smash winners! I can reach and slice the ball and still keep it in play, whereas a BACKHAND ONLY stroke was ineffective, inefficient, and uncomfortable. If he serves to my backhand, SLICE. Selection, selection, selection. I love it.

I won more often today. Holy crap, I love my backhand slice.

Haha. Moment of utter happiness.

EDIT: It took me about a week to learn a good backhand slice. The first few drills I did with my coach was aweful. I was hitting balls miles up into the air, out of the court. Or mishitting. But now, I DRIVE the ball forward. Every single day I'd go to a wall, and just practice slicing.

SystemicAnomaly
04-14-2008, 04:59 AM
Congrats. Was there some trick or epiphany that enabled you to learn to drive the BH slice? Or was it just a matter of your body learning the correct racket face angle?

Djokovicfan4life
04-14-2008, 05:04 AM
The best you can do for your slice is to step into it just like a drive. When I hit my driving slice properly I can force more errors than I can with my topspin backhand. Nothing better than a low driving slice that lands deep in the court and skids low.

Good to hear that you finally got it, dude.

Nellie
04-14-2008, 06:58 AM
The best you can do for your slice is to step into it just like a drive. When I hit my driving slice properly I can force more errors than I can with my topspin backhand. Nothing better than a low driving slice that lands deep in the court and skids low.

Good to hear that you finally got it, dude.

This is good advice - on offensive shots, step into the slice to really drive it. Also, stay low and keep your knees bent

Bungalo Bill
04-14-2008, 07:08 AM
The best you can do for your slice is to step into it just like a drive. When I hit my driving slice properly I can force more errors than I can with my topspin backhand. Nothing better than a low driving slice that lands deep in the court and skids low.

Good to hear that you finally got it, dude.

The last several posts you have been coming up with some great advice. Glad to have you around.

obnoxious2
04-14-2008, 07:20 AM
The most important part of the backhand slice is making sure that you turn your back shoulder towards the net.

On that note, I'm still having trouble getting a good slice with the forehand side. I can slice it back but not like a dropshot slice.

Djokovicfan4life
04-14-2008, 08:02 AM
The most important part of the backhand slice is making sure that you turn your back shoulder towards the net.

On that note, I'm still having trouble getting a good slice with the forehand side. I can slice it back but not like a dropshot slice.

My forehand slice blows, to say the least. I always end up using a semi-western grip, which is obviously a recipe for disaster.

Good for mishit dropshots maybe, but a forehand slice? Not really.

Rafael_Nadal_6257
04-14-2008, 05:43 PM
For a forehand slice, I do just about the same thing as a backhand slice. I just step into the slice and remember to aim below the top of the net (the ball will rise due to the backspin because of Bernoulli's principle).

Sometimes, an Eastern grip can be used to really make the ball skid off the ground, because of the angle of the racket when it contacts the ball. I've also heard that when Federer does what the commentators call a 'squash shot', he uses a shot more over to the left, sometimes an eastern backhand grip, to get the ball back deeper, as he only does those shots when stretched out wide or in trouble.

ogruskie
04-14-2008, 05:52 PM
Congrats. Was there some trick or epiphany that enabled you to learn to drive the BH slice? Or was it just a matter of your body learning the correct racket face angle?

Well, like I said, I had a very limited range of strokes. When my opponent hit a very low ball, I was use a backhand stroke on the ball and make it fly waaaaay out of the court. I needed a new approach to getting those low balls, so I started learning the backhand slice. I went to a wall and practiced everyday, with the addition of help from my coach. Also, it just spices my game up. I can hit a backhand with some power, or slice it to take some pace off. Always keep my opponent on his toes, you know?

Everyone else, thanks for the advice. I'm not sure whether I'm following through with all the knee-bending/shoulder turning. I'll have to do some self-analysis the next time I play. But I'm just assuming if the stroke works, then I'm doing at least something right...

Rickson
04-15-2008, 05:40 AM
And I feel a lot more confident with my game now.

I would typically use a forehand stroke and a backhand stroke with occasional volleys. But for the most part, only forehand and backhand strokes. My game was very limited and predictable.

But now that I have the backhand slice, OMG. So much SELECTION with what to do! I can smash a backhand, OR I can take pace off the ball and make the opponent run from his comfort zone of the baseline into the service box, where I can get past him and smash winners! I can reach and slice the ball and still keep it in play, whereas a BACKHAND ONLY stroke was ineffective, inefficient, and uncomfortable. If he serves to my backhand, SLICE. Selection, selection, selection. I love it.

I won more often today. Holy crap, I love my backhand slice.

Haha. Moment of utter happiness.

EDIT: It took me about a week to learn a good backhand slice. The first few drills I did with my coach was aweful. I was hitting balls miles up into the air, out of the court. Or mishitting. But now, I DRIVE the ball forward. Every single day I'd go to a wall, and just practice slicing.

Don't slice everything though because I take that as a weakness and go to the net a lot on backhand slicers.

5263
04-15-2008, 05:51 AM
If you add a bit of side slice to this shot, it will help 2 things.

1. helps your slice not to pop up too much and float long

and

2. in defensive situations, that little side hop on the bounce can really throw off your opponent if he wants to attack with too much aggression, or it can keep him from attacking altogether!

Nellie
04-15-2008, 06:01 AM
With some practice, you can vary the slice so that it can be a deep floater (defensive shot) or an almost flat, driving shot (offensive shot). Do not think that every slice needs to be the same.

Per Rickson, above, do not hit passing shots with slice. Only Laver has ever done that effectively.

Djokovicfan4life
04-15-2008, 07:40 AM
Don't slice everything though because I take that as a weakness and go to the net a lot on backhand slicers.

Ha, I played my brother yesterday and hit mostly slices at him until he came to net, then I hit a couple nice topspin shots right into his body until he screwed up! Man, that felt good! :)

He still won, 6-3, but at least I played well.