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Serpententacle
04-16-2008, 02:53 PM
I have been two-handed all my life (on both sides), and want to develop a one-handed forehand with topspin (being that I'm a 31 year-old male). Does anyone have fundamental advice for making this switch? When I try the one-handed top-spin forehand it just goes directly into the bottom of the net. If I try to make a little adjustment of the angle of my racquet, open, then it sails to the fence. Is my timing off? What can I do to make it right?... mind you, the hitting partner of mine hits floaters, not very hard, so I wonder if that has something to do with it...

Rickson
04-16-2008, 03:35 PM
Good takeback, laid back wrist, lead with the buttcap, good followthrough. You should do ok if you do those things.

Vision84
04-16-2008, 03:46 PM
First of all check your grip. Use an eastern or a semi-western and then brush the ball low to high. If it is going into the net then imagine hitting it higher. If it is landing long then impart more topspin on the ball. Of course this is simplistic but is the result of many errors. If you are over topspining it and it is landing way to short then swing through the ball more. On contact the strings should be aiming forward or a tad down. I recommend starting the swing by taking the racket back and down, pointing the buttcap at the ball and then swinging forward towards and up on the ball and then your arm should naturally follow through across your arm or over your shoulder. This is a fairly simple classic style forehand but should be a good place to start since this is a message board and it would be harder and take longer to explain a modern forehand.

If you aren't sure what the grips are then this video helps.
http://www.fuzzyyellowballs.com/index.php?col=265907

Essential Tennis
04-16-2008, 03:48 PM
I have been two-handed all my life (on both sides), and want to develop a one-handed forehand with topspin (being that I'm a 31 year-old male). Does anyone have fundamental advice for making this switch? When I try the one-handed top-spin forehand it just goes directly into the bottom of the net. If I try to make a little adjustment of the angle of my racquet, open, then it sails to the fence. Is my timing off? What can I do to make it right?... mind you, the hitting partner of mine hits floaters, not very hard, so I wonder if that has something to do with it...

How long have you been playing with two off both sides? If its been a long time be prepared to work hard and persevere if you want to make this change successful, however it's certainly doable.

A big change between the two strokes is going to be your contact point. Your contact point on the new forehand should be a little bit farther in front of you, and probably a little bit farther away from your body as well to allow your dominant arm to freely swing and work.

In terms of your specific problems of either hitting really long or really short, the basics that you're trying to achieve are an upward racket path as you rotate forwards with your body, and a flat (perpendicular) racket face at contact. If you accomplish those two things you will be able to produce a shot that is lifted over the net and falls back into the court. If your shot goes directly down to the bottom of the net, then your face is too closed at contact. Any swing that launches the ball into the back fence means your racket face is too open. I'm guessing that after using your two hander for a long time you're a little shaky at contact and not terribly confident yet which will result in sporadic changes in the racket face, make sure your hand, forearm, and wrist stay nice and relaxed as you try to learn the new stroke, and find a grip that offers a happy medium between the two extremes.

There's many other little things that are possibly going on, but what I typed above are the big things to keep in mind. If you're making an upward swing and keeping your face flat at contact you should be able to start putting the ball in play with a nice relaxed stroke, and start building from there. Again, be patient, it's going to take some work. Best of luck to you

Rickson
04-16-2008, 05:10 PM
Keep that top hand on the throat instead of directly above.

Djokovicfan4life
04-16-2008, 09:51 PM
If you're not used to it then you're probably hitting with your racquet face in too closed of a position, like when I first switched to a semi western forehand grip. It frustrating, just keep at it and check out this site for awesome free instruction: http://www.fuzzyyellowballs.com

P.S. If you're used to having two hands on the racquet at all times then maybe your preparation is different now that you switched? Has your footwork suffered at all?

anchorage
04-17-2008, 04:05 AM
I think it's not a bad idea to build it up in stages, i.e. instead of going for the high loop take back, full motion straight away, get used to the feel of the shot from the 'ready to hit' position with the racket head low. Also, I find it helps to really start by aiming to hit very high over the net - go for a clearance of 2 meters plus. Do this by brushing up the ball (don't open the racket face!). This obviously takes the net out of the equation and gets you used to the ball flight trajectory, spin etc. As you get used to this, add more power by accelerating through the ball, but keep it smooth.

Serpententacle
04-17-2008, 07:54 AM
Nice. Thank you all. With this information I have good motivation to begin the transition. I will work on this and report back if and when I find myself succeeding. :)

Djokovicfan4life
04-17-2008, 07:58 AM
Oh, you WILL succeed, I'm sure. It may just take a little extra patience if you're used to that extra hand on all your ground strokes.

brownbearfalling
04-17-2008, 10:33 PM
Shopping Cart Theory: you don't just rush at a shopping cart and tackle it to move it. You engage the handle bar then push it.

Using one hand gives you alot more freedom. But this freedom can also turn into margin for error. With this freedom of swing, don't just swing at the ball. Time it and then at the point of contact is where you are squaring your shoulders, rolling your foot and incorporating your hip. Then follow through.

Playing with a two hand forehand drastically cuts down margin of swinging error and gives you a very consistant swing. Keep that rhythm and consistency but just use a one hand form that the others have explained.

At 31, I am sure you can pull it off. And your parents will be amazed.
________
VARIABLE UNIVERSAL LIFE INSURANCE FORUM (http://www.insurance-forums.org/variable-universal-life-insurance/)

Serpententacle
05-12-2008, 10:31 AM
Alright... update on my forehand woes... I've been doing steady progress weaning myself away from the 2 handed forehand, and have made the conversion to the one handed. My game has dramatically declined, but is now just starting to get a little better, slowly. I was willing to take the hit for the change.

The main problem that is lingering for my one handed forehand, now... is that I can rip the crap out of low bounces, but have lots of trouble controlling the high ball or getting a solid whack on the high bouncing ball. What adjustments must I make to get a hold of a high bouncing ball from the baseline?

By the way, my forehand has considerable topspin, but not nearly as much as I'd like.

Rafael_Nadal_6257
05-12-2008, 01:36 PM
A good stroke always starts with the footwork. :D Split-step, then gauge the trajectory of the ball, and back up a little if it is a high ball. Generally, high balls are easier to apply topspin to and generate a good shot off of, so don't drop back too much and then suddenly lunge forward at the ball.

Start your racquet higher up, and instead of brushing through the ball so much, try to drive through the ball. By virtue of the tennis ball's higher position, you do not need to apply as much topspin and can hit down more. Practice!

AlpineCadet
05-12-2008, 01:46 PM
Everyone leads their forehand with the buttcap, because it automatically happens in a smooth swing. It's hard to picture someone who doesn't do this, unless they force their forehands on every stroke. As other members have mentioned, it's getting into position, and getting behind the ball and making a consistent contact that's the hardest to learn at first. But it comes naturally with time, a lot of practice, and self adjustments.

wihamilton
05-12-2008, 02:15 PM
Alright... update on my forehand woes... I've been doing steady progress weaning myself away from the 2 handed forehand, and have made the conversion to the one handed. My game has dramatically declined, but is now just starting to get a little better, slowly. I was willing to take the hit for the change.

The main problem that is lingering for my one handed forehand, now... is that I can rip the crap out of low bounces, but have lots of trouble controlling the high ball or getting a solid whack on the high bouncing ball. What adjustments must I make to get a hold of a high bouncing ball from the baseline?

By the way, my forehand has considerable topspin, but not nearly as much as I'd like.

Same mechanics, just don't drop your racket down as much during the backswing. In other words, keep it higher up for a high ball.

Tennisman912
05-12-2008, 09:11 PM
Serpententacle,

Only thing I can think to add is to remember that the higher the ball, the farther forward your contact point is. I am guessing you are comfortable with the lower balls because that makes your contact point a bit farther back and closer to where it was with your two handed forehand. We aren't talking a big difference, but something to be aware of that may help you. Relearning your timing and trusting that you have to hit the ball earlier and farther in front than your two hander will take some time.

Good luck

TM

quicken
05-12-2008, 09:43 PM
When the ball is high, the low to high trajectory can be a bit harmful. Instead, try hitting the ball in a linear swing, much like hitting a flat ball. Or you could just step back and hit the ball on the fall.