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Tennissiz
04-18-2008, 01:43 PM
I am playing in an upcoming tournament at 2200 ft elevation. I normally play at sea level.

Does anyone have any advice on string tension and/or strings for adjusting to a higher altitude?

I normally play with 17g Pro Hurricane Tour (yellow)/ 16g Natural gut hybrid strung at 58/60 lbs.

YULitle
04-18-2008, 01:53 PM
Assuming that you use the same type of balls, I suggest stringing tighter. The ball speed increases (all other things equal) in high altitudes due to decrease in air resistance. To keep balls that normally fall in from going to deep, bump up the tension. Typically only 2-3lbs.

Max Winther
04-18-2008, 02:16 PM
You shouldn't notice it that much if your only going up 2200 feet or so. The only time I've noticed it (I live in Albuquerque, NM 5500 ft) is when I played at sea level in california. Its interesting though, Yulitle brings up a point that I would like to explore further; The ball speed increases in high altitudes due to decrease in air resistance. I think that may be true, but the ball would fall faster due to decrease in air pressure and resistance. I haven't the experience needed to say for sure, but I think you may want to RAISE tension to combat the effect that the thin air has on the ball.

nickb
04-18-2008, 02:19 PM
I am playing in an upcoming tournament at 2200 ft elevation. I normally play at sea level.

Does anyone have any advice on string tension and/or strings for adjusting to a higher altitude?

I normally play with 17g Pro Hurricane Tour (yellow)/ 16g Natural gut hybrid strung at 58/60 lbs.

This is just my opinion:

Keep it the same. You are already playing on different courts against people you have never played before. You dont want to be trying to get used to different strings with all that going on.

Nick

YULitle
04-18-2008, 02:22 PM
The slowing force behind wind resistance is relative to the velocity. Having less wind resistance disencumbers forward motion proportionately more than downward motion due to it having a higher velocity. They obviously both play a factor, but I reason that the depth is affected more than the weight of the ball (or how much it drops.) This is why it's typically only a small adjustment.

scotus
04-18-2008, 02:22 PM
When going to a place of higher altitude, it is always a good idea to have at least one frame strung higher.

Max Winther
04-18-2008, 08:40 PM
I think the best answer is NickB's. There are high-altitude balls that we use which bounce lower. It's pretty hard to notice though. You'll probably notice your shortness of breath before your string tension.

Oh, and thanks for the explanation YuLitle.

sandflea
04-18-2008, 09:07 PM
I play at high altitude(4500 ft.), coming from the east I had some adjustments to make. I wound up stringing my rackets tighter and shortening up on my backswing. If you have more than one racket, keep one the same and bump up the second.

Steve Huff
04-18-2008, 09:59 PM
Bring an oxygen tank.

[K]aotic
04-18-2008, 10:19 PM
you should just leave it. YOU should adjust to the situation and not depend on your racket to adjust for you. Another thing is, i'd work on cardio too. The thin air might make you tired faster because you'll be breathing in less oxygen with each breath.