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View Full Version : Starting to get tennis elbow:


njjohan
05-08-2008, 03:48 PM
Here's the thing, I'm a 16 year old baseliner currently using a (rather beat up) pure drive + (non-cortex). Lately, I've begun to feel the rumblings of tennis elbow, around the same time I got the racket restrung. However, I'm using a cheap syngut, so I doubt that's the problem. Cutting to the chase, does anyone have any recommendations for reasonably heavy (10oz) rackets that are arm friendly?

samster
05-08-2008, 04:53 PM
I think you should get a non-Babolat frame.

Nitro
05-08-2008, 05:13 PM
10 oz is not a heavy racquet it all and it won't make your arm feel better. If you're 16 you can probably swing a heavier racquet and it will help with the arm pain (transfers less vibration). I would suggest a string change first. Natural gut would be best, but probably too expensive. I would switch to a softer multi and drop your tension a few pounds. Switching racquets however is not the first step when experiencing arm pain.

njjohan
05-08-2008, 11:39 PM
10 oz is not a heavy racquet it all and it won't make your arm feel better. If you're 16 you can probably swing a heavier racquet and it will help with the arm pain (transfers less vibration). I would suggest a string change first. Natural gut would be best, but probably too expensive. I would switch to a softer multi and drop your tension a few pounds. Switching racquets however is not the first step when experiencing arm pain.

Thing is, it was strung like 65, but has lot a ridiculous amount of tension over 3 weeks, so would now be more like a 55. In answer to the poster, I was under the impression that a PD+ is quite heavy, although I have the EU version, which is 10.6 oz.

timsims
05-09-2008, 05:55 AM
I'd recommend looking at approximately 12 oz that is head light and more flexy. But I would also agree with Nitro here and say that your first step should be rest. Nearly any other racquet can aggravate the injury until it has a chance to heal.

pr0n8r
05-09-2008, 06:38 AM
Be patient. At 16, I wasn't very patient with sports injuries.
Soak your elbow in a deep bowl of ice water a couple times a day for about 15 minutes, and after playing. It's a hassle, but well worth it.
I agree with the above that you should look for a softer string and go with lower tensions.
Try a 12 ounce, head light racket that's not too stiff, and see if you can play with it. While you might not have enough control with lower string tensions on the PD, you can probably do it with a more traditional player's frame.


New Frames I would look into:

Head Prestige Mid or Midplus
Something from the Wilson KSix-One line
Dunlop 2Hundred


Wallet-friendly frames:

Prince Original Graphite OS
Prince Triple Threat Warrior MP


My recommendation: Head Prestige Mid, with a soft Multi like Prince Synthetic Multifilament or Pro Supex Maxim Touch strung at about 58.

obnoxious2
05-09-2008, 09:07 AM
Get new strings. And don't use a hybrid setup for atleast 2-3 months. Use the forgivingest synthetic gut you can find or even natural gut if you have a highroller daddy.

roddick89
05-09-2008, 09:13 AM
I agree with what was mentioned above about not changing racquet at this stage but if you do ive heard the pure drive with cortex is great, it actually does what it claims to do.

gsharma
05-09-2008, 09:23 AM
Like it has already been mentioned, change your string to a softer string and try another racquet. I personally play with a Dunlop Fmil 200 18x20 that's customized to around 12.6 oz. Here's the deal with heavier frames, you will never be able to pick one up and start playing comfortably with it. But if the specs are right (such as head-light, flexible frame), you will eventually build up your strength to play with the racquet.

Another thing to remember with any sports injury is to rehab it aggressively. Like someone already mentioned, ice it multiple times a day. Once it starts to get better, you can start some contrast-showers (cold water for 30 seconds, hot water for 1 minute on the affected body part). And lastly, you need to get stronger, period! Pay attention to your training which includes flexibility work, proper warm-ups, strength training. You have to have strong shoulders, healthy rotator-cuffs etc. You are young so you will recover but in order to be healthy for a long time, you have to train hard.

njjohan
05-09-2008, 10:20 AM
The funny thing is, I basically didn't play for 5 days and (naively) went out and hit 150 serves today. The funny thing is I am one of the most muscled kids I know, so weakness is definitely not a factor. It could just have been a sign of breaking in a crappy string, I'm not sure, but the symptoms have up and gone. However, its probably about time I get a new racket, so I'll demo a couple of the suggestions and go from there.

gsharma
05-09-2008, 10:37 AM
The funny thing is, I basically didn't play for 5 days and (naively) went out and hit 150 serves today. The funny thing is I am one of the most muscled kids I know, so weakness is definitely not a factor. It could just have been a sign of breaking in a crappy string, I'm not sure, but the symptoms have up and gone. However, its probably about time I get a new racket, so I'll demo a couple of the suggestions and go from there.

I'm not saying you are weak. All I'm saying is emphasize training. Most people don't realize the importance of it until they get much older and have already incurred repetitive stress injuries. For example, when you serve you externally rotate your shoulders. To balance that, you must do some internal shoulder rotations. This is just an example but my point is you must have a sound training regimen that will prevent injury. Btw, I lift heavy 4 times a week with a guy who also trains some MLB pitchers. If there is one thing I've learnt from him then it would be to lift hard and lift smart. That's the only way to stay healthy in all sports.

Btw, also try Prince Tour Diablo. It's nice players racquet that is 8-9 pts head-light. I'm thinking of getting that one too. Good luck man.

njjohan
05-09-2008, 12:06 PM
Yeah, I'll definitely give that a try, after all I do need to bring my left arm up to scratch, so may as well work on my right at the same time. I remember my PE teacher once saying something about balancing muscles, and I guess its time I took that to heart. I want to be playing as long as I can, so hopefully that will longer than 40!.

Just to clear something up, my reluctance to try different string jobs is because I don't know anywhere that strings for less than $30, and in a family where I'm the only one who knows that different strings are well...different, I can imagine how that conversation will go. Thanks for the words of wisdom though!

edit: In a way, it's unfortunate that Prince rackets are arm-friendly, because for whatever reason, I just can't stand the unflared grip shape, compared to the hyper-flared babolat. I don't know if thats consistent throughout, as the only Prince racket I have is the hybrid shark!