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View Full Version : Does cutting out the string in a wrong fasion damage the frame ?


86C415
06-02-2008, 06:04 AM
I took one of my racquets (k90) to the tennis shop to get it restringed, since I had received a pack of Nat Gut for my birthday. :)

The stringer, who I hadn't seen before, got right on it. The racquets was strung with Alu Power at 55lbs. As far as I know, the proper way to remove an intact string (Alu wasn't broken, was about 2 months old) is to cut in a cross patern starting from the middle of the string bed.

Well, this guy went right for the edges, cutting right near the frame in a circular motion around it. I don't have any experience with stringing so I couldn't start yelling at him, maybe that's a proper way to do it...

Should I go make a scene ? The racquet looks and plays fine, however when I put it on top of another k90, it seems that the grommet holes' position dont match perfectly... and that "w" on the bumper guard is slightly off, which make me think the frame might be bent.

Here are teh options:

a. Poor quality control from Wilson.
b. I'm just paranoid.
c. That guy actually managed to slightly bend the frame.

Thanks.

the Town Sherif
06-02-2008, 06:54 AM
you are correct in that the best way to cut strings out is start in the middle and alternate cutting strings from each of the four sides until you reach the frame. So the stringer was using poor technique.

now, will him doing that one time to your racquet damage it permanently, NO!
but it definetly doesn't look good for a professional to be doing it that way.

PimpMyGame
06-02-2008, 06:55 AM
a. This has been known to happen. Due to manufacturing processes there will be slight differences from frame to frame. That's why it's wise to buy a matched pair if you buy two rackets at the same time.

b. You sound paranoid, so I'll say this is a possibility.

c. It's possible, but it's also possible that the difference in tensions has had something to do with it.

I would also say that as the strings were cut and immediately replaced I don't think any damage would be done, but stringing's not my thing so I'm sure someone can either back me up or call me a knob!

It may be a silly question but have you battered or dropped the racket to put it slightly out?

TennezSport
06-02-2008, 07:30 AM
There are two ways to properly remove string from a racquet, unfortunately your stringer did neither. You are correct in your statement of cutting from the center in a diagonal fashion alternating sides; this is method one.

The second method does use a circular pattern but also starts from the center and works out toward the frame. While the method your stringer used is not correct, it should not damage the frame as you stated. This was more like the famous poor QC from Wilson. PMG has a good point when ordering multiples of a racquet, best to ask for matched frames.

TennezSport :cool:

86C415
06-02-2008, 07:30 AM
Thanks for replying.

Me being paranoid is somehow justified, over here a k90 costs about 300US dollars... so I just can't have it wrecked by a newbie stringer.

No, never dropped it. Reason stands above. :)

The Dampener
06-02-2008, 09:09 AM
Even better, don't wait for your stringer to do it. Cut the strings out yourself, as soon as you can after they break. Leaving broken strings in your racquet for any period of time is what does the real damage.

Kirko
06-02-2008, 09:44 AM
Even better, don't wait for your stringer to do it. Cut the strings out yourself, as soon as you can after they break. Leaving broken strings in your racquet for any period of time is what does the real damage.

I agree with that. Always did it myself when I could. The best stringer I know and he has strung rackets for Davenport just uses a pair of fiskar scissors. eg. cuts right thru the middle of the stringbed.

MAX PLY
06-02-2008, 09:47 AM
Absolutely agree. Cut them out as soon as you can. You should think about keeping a set of cutters in your bag for just that purpose.

jorel
06-02-2008, 12:30 PM
all i know is that i will never again cut the cross string first before a main string

it deformed the tip of my racquet from an oval shape to a more circular shape

from an oblong shape to a flatter shape at the tip

86C415
06-03-2008, 03:16 AM
I guess I am indeed paranoid. :D

Thank you for your answers.

pow
06-03-2008, 03:33 AM
I think as long as you cut the strings out, it's ok, you will damage it if you leave an imbalance in your strings over time.

OrangeOne
06-03-2008, 03:48 AM
I think people worry *way too much* about this. Even one of the best stringers I've ever seen just cut them out in whatever pattern, full stop.

What do you think makes more of an impact:

a. Snapping 2 or 3 strings all at once or

b. Cutting out strings from an already detensioned stringbed with a broken string?

Hmmmm.

Anyways - as others have said - if you're really paranoid, cut them out yourself ASAP with whatever pattern you just the most paranoid ;)

86C415
06-03-2008, 04:11 AM
As I've mentioned in the first post, the Alu wasn't popped when he cut it.

DashaandSafin
06-03-2008, 05:36 AM
It really doesnt matter.

KFwinds
06-03-2008, 07:20 AM
It really doesnt matter.

Finally, the correct answer; it doesn't matter how you cut the strings out as long as they are removed immediately. Yes, the frame will deform slightly when the first few strings are clipped (just like the frame deforms temporarily during stringing), but there shouldn't be any permanent damage done to your frame as a result of cutting the strings out.

Stan
06-03-2008, 07:54 AM
There is a proper method for removing strings and this has been described by others. Conscientious stringers will remove strings using the safest method.

There is a possibility here that if the stringer did not have the knowledge on the proper way to remove strings that he may also have been lacking on his knowledge in regard to mounting, pulling tension, the whole stringing process. It is possible for an incompetent stringer to "bend" a frame so it comes out in a different shape after stringing. This is easily accomplished if the mounts are not secure.

GeorgeLucas
06-03-2008, 08:23 AM
You are absolutely justified in your paranoia.

The slapdash manner by which your stringer clipped your strings may have permanently scarred your k90. In theory, it will never play the same way again.

The best course of action in your situation is to seek legal counsel and, perhaps, take this mockery of a stringer to court.

86C415
06-03-2008, 09:20 AM
I actually thought about it, but unfortunately I don't have any proof. He can just deny having done the cutting that way. :(

Now seriously, If you lived in a country where the price of a good racquet is about equal to the average monthly salary, maybe you'd understand why I was concerned about having it damaged that way.

Cheers.

Loco4Tennis
06-03-2008, 09:28 AM
i would say that the removal of the strings is more of a concern for the people who have soft frame racquets, babolats, liquidmetal or lighter materials like that,
the graphite and other suck materials can take a little more abuse and do not flex as much and should still be ok

if you wanna see a great yulitle video on removing string, here is goes
http://youtube.com/watch?v=vablJWPV9jU

jorel
06-04-2008, 04:05 AM
if the order in which you cut out strings does not matter then it stands to reason that the order in which you string a racquet also does not matter

try stringing the crosses on a racquet first and then the mains and tell us what happens to your racquet. thanks.

nickb
06-04-2008, 04:41 AM
The way in which strings are cut out really does not matter....as long as it is done quickly any method will not damage the frame.

jorel
06-04-2008, 06:43 AM
The way in which strings are cut out really does not matter....as long as it is done quickly any method will not damage the frame.

so as long as i do it quickly... i can cut out all the crosses first and then quickly cut all the mains (especially in a two piece job)? (the order doesn't matter right?)

i would love to see someone do that on an original wilson sting or a dunlop max 200g

can you say pancake?

. any deformation of the racquet head will change the swingweight and swing characteristics of any racquet

nickb
06-04-2008, 06:48 AM
so as long as i do it quickly... i can cut out all the crosses first and then quickly cut all the mains (especially in a two piece job)? (the order doesn't matter right?)

i would love to see someone do that on an original wilson sting or a dunlop max 200g

can you say pancake?

. any deformation of the racquet head will change the swingweight and swing characteristics of any racquet

Erm...the crosses should be cut out FIRST if you are doing it quickly...if you have a load of rackets to do and have the correct string cutters you can just go down the crosses and across the mains in a few seconds. This is fine. Ask any pro stringer. Those rackets break when you look at them...im not talking about relics here...there is more stress during stringing than cutting strings out in a few seconds.

jorel
06-04-2008, 06:55 AM
Erm...the crosses should be cut out FIRST if you are doing it quickly...if you have a load of rackets to do and have the correct string cutters you can just go down the crosses and across the mains in a few seconds. This is fine. Ask any pro stringer. .

The way in which strings are cut out really does not matter....as long as it is done quickly any method will not damage the frame.

so the order DOES matter. Thanks.

nickb
06-04-2008, 07:27 AM
so the order DOES matter. Thanks.

No it DOES NOT matter...stringers will tell you that the crosses SHOULD be cut out first but I personally DONT THINK IT MATTERS.

Hope that makes sense.

jorel
06-04-2008, 09:04 AM
No it DOES NOT matter...stringers will tell you that the crosses SHOULD be cut out first but I personally DONT THINK IT MATTERS.

Hope that makes sense.

i have never heard a stringer recommend that the crosses should be cut out first as you just stated.

Loco4Tennis
06-04-2008, 09:13 AM
i have never heard a stringer recommend that the crosses should be cut out first as you just stated.

JOREL, while not a good technique to follow, Nickb does mention a good point, and make sense to me to cut the crosses first out of the two choices (mains/crosses), whether this is stringer recomendation i dont know, but since crosses hold the tension better/longer then the mains for the mear fact that the crosses are shorter, cutting the crosses would release the most tension quicker and thus reduse the most risk of deformation better, while the mains still take on some of the load, unitl you can cut thoes out as well

but i am not gonna do that because it seems that their is a undecisive debate whether or not damage is done to the racquets
i rather follow safe cutting procedures and cut as the above video i posted suggests, it makes good sence to me to release tension from the center out in a circular motion

nickb
06-04-2008, 01:54 PM
i have never heard a stringer recommend that the crosses should be cut out first as you just stated.

Watch YULitle's video on cutting out strings...he says the same as me...if you are going to cut them all very quickly with cutters it is best to do the crosses first. Last in should be first out...it puts less stress on the frame.

nickb
06-04-2008, 01:56 PM
JOREL, while not a good technique to follow, Nickb does mention a good point, and make sense to me to cut the crosses first out of the two choices (mains/crosses), whether this is stringer recomendation i dont know, but since crosses hold the tension better/longer then the mains for the mear fact that the crosses are shorter, cutting the crosses would release the most tension quicker and thus reduse the most risk of deformation better, while the mains still take on some of the load, unitl you can cut thoes out as well

but i am not gonna do that because it seems that their is a undecisive debate whether or not damage is done to the racquets
i rather follow safe cutting procedures and cut as the above video i posted suggests, it makes good sence to me to release tension from the center out in a circular motion


Thanks...I string over 30 frames a week sometimes...I just cut the strings out crosses first then mains all at once...the stress on the frame is minimal and does not matter. There is more damage done during stringing.

TenniseaWilliams
06-04-2008, 05:27 PM
YULitle's video says it all. I prefer to snip diagonals (main/cross simultaneously) starting from the center and working in a diagonal back and forth towards the rim. I believe the USRSA recommends both methods described in the video.

There are obviously faster ways to do it. I have no idea if the amount of time spent is worth the stress saved on the frame, to me minimizing damage to the frame is top priority.

KFwinds
06-04-2008, 09:50 PM
if the order in which you cut out strings does not matter then it stands to reason that the order in which you string a racquet also does not matter

As long as I have been here, this might be the dumbest thing I have ever read on this board (and that says a lot...)

Not that someone that would make a statement like this would understand, BUT - during stringing your racquet is under much greater stress for a much longer period of time than the 10-20 seconds it takes to cut the strings out of a racquet. But of course you need to be slightly more intelligent than a sack of hammers to understand this, so good luck...

jorel
06-05-2008, 04:07 AM
As long as I have been here, this might be the dumbest thing I have ever read on this board (and that says a lot...)

Not that someone that would make a statement like this would understand, BUT - during stringing your racquet is under much greater stress for a much longer period of time than the 10-20 seconds it takes to cut the strings out of a racquet. But of course you need to be slightly more intelligent than a sack of hammers to understand this, so good luck...

are you unhappy?

jorel
06-05-2008, 04:25 AM
This is a forum to discuss tennis topics and have fun.. in reality, most of these topics are pretty meaningless in the whole scheme of things… to get so upset over something (enough to be malicious) for something so comparatively meaningless is concerning.

Lets keep it fun out there boys!

jefferson
06-05-2008, 08:39 AM
Definitely supposed to start from the center and work your way to the frame. Even more definitely if the customer is watching!! However as others have said this should not damage frame, too short of a period of time. The other thing I would say is that we aren't dealing with metal frames anymore. If there is damage it is cracked or flat out broken. I have not seen a warped or deformed frame since the frames of the 80's and early 90's! (Talking about the better frames, not the $30 ones)
i think you were wise to stop and think about blowing up and making a scene before you did! Nice self control