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Coach Carter
07-04-2008, 07:50 PM
As a college tennis coach...I gotta say you need to do some research. You need to go watch matches for schools of all sizes...even D3. The reason why...you may realize you have work to do still to make a team at any level. I am not saying it to be ugly, but I coach at a D3 and we play D1's every year and beat them badly. It's more about finding a school where you can get a great education and where the team is "like you". When I say that, I mean if you're aggressive then that's the kind of team you need to find. Would you want to play at a D1 where you get no scholarship and play 12 matches a year (losing 11 of them)...while not even traveling out of the state...where the players and coach don't even take it serious? Would you want to play at D3 where you get a nice academic or merit scholarship and play 28 matches a year...while traveling all over (including an 8 day spring break trip)...where all the players were highly ranked and are pushing to win a title? The tough decision is there to make. Are you more interested in your friends "thinking" you play somewhere big...when you may get a t-shirt and string some racquets for the "real players"...or do you really want to be a "difference maker" on a team? Look at rosters on the internet...research the players (jrs rankings)...see where you would probably be. If you haven't got some attention from a big school coach by the end of jr year, then it's all up hill. The other thing most kids or parents don't realize...a "fully funded" D1 men's team has 4.5 scholarships and a women's has 8...in D2 it's 4.5 and 6 respectively. That's not 4.5 new each year! Look at rosters and see how many foreign players are there. You'd also be surprised at how few of the teams are fully funded (have all their scholarships)...I'd say about 60% of D1's and far less than 50% of D2's have their scholarships...on the guys side of things. It's all about educating yourself and asking yourself how much you truly want to play college tennis. It can be a great experience...don't be a sheep...be a leader and do something amazing!!!

dork2tennisstud
07-04-2008, 08:39 PM
Good insight Coach. Your post may come across as venting as much as helping, but you definitely made some good points about finding a team that fits your personality.

And yes, d-3 teams, especially the really good ones, can definitely be more professionally run than some d-1 teams (and vice versa). There are some really great and really awful teams at all levels. Like you said, you have to do the research. Hopefully this message board turns into one of many resources to use in that research.

Coach Carter
07-04-2008, 10:06 PM
I enjoy seeing the board too...definitely didn't mean to sound like I was venting. I feel like a big part of my job as a D3 coach is educating the good tennis player of the quality of D3 tennis and of school's program. I am always intrigued when I see players that haven't gone to watch the tennis. If they go see the serious schools play, then they will want to play at a D3. It's top notch American tennis. I coach down in Texas, at LeTourneau University. We're always looking for hard working, serious, team guys...we are trying to do incredible things. I'd love to talk to any players looking. I work real hard to make it the experience of a lifetime. LeTourneau is one of the top private engineering and aviation schools in the nation. We have over 60 majors, but we're famous for our engineering and aviation. I can be contacted at: dougcarter@letu.edu

jaggy
07-05-2008, 05:00 AM
Hey Coach, just for my info., what are the scholarship opportunities at D3, is it similar to D1?

Coach Carter
07-05-2008, 07:07 AM
Hey Coach, just for my info., what are the scholarship opportunities at D3, is it similar to D1?

in D3, your scholarship will be based on academics and merit. you will not get a "tennis" scholarship...which ego wise is the stumbling block for many players/parents. they feel that they have spent money on lessons, etc and they need a payoff...or they can't imagine telling friends and neighbors that Johnny or Suzie are going to school NOT on a tennis scholarship. many people can't wrap their hands around that a scholarship is just as good no matter what it says on them. Johnny or Suzie may be in a pack of 10 kids fighting for 1 spot at "State Tech"...truly never having a shot at playing outside the club team (which is not NCAA tennis by the way). many players (like myself) think they don't have to work in the HS classroom and so they can barely get into school much less get a scholarship. they don't realize that the college coach doesn't really want a brain dead kid that can't spell foot fault there. doesn't help your team to have an "Andy Roddick" ability type there if he can't stay eligible...I know from experience.

essentially answering your questions, if you have worked hard in HS then D3 is a great place for you because your scholarship will be nice...usually. alot of D1's and D2's do not really have a scholarship to provide either...in that case, they are in the same boat as us...it's gonna be about your academiccs and need. I saw the comment, "they may give you a cross country scholarship"...maybe if the coach also doubles up and coaches cross country, but sooner or later the school will look at his cross country side and say, "wow, y'all suck...why can't your kids run?" and there will be some fact checking issues. in reality, that kind of thing doesn't happen.

kids...cover your bases and work hard while you are in HS...help yourself out. make it easy for the coach to know they have found something in you. do your homework on the school and team...is a place where the players and coach seem "wired" like you...does the school seem nice (how are the people there...do they support tennis or is it HS all over again with football or other sports dominating)...and most of all, BE REALISTIC...it can be your biggest ally as you go through the process. I hear from kids every year as I ask on visits..."what do plan to do in life"..."I'm going pro after college"...coming from a 18 year old that's ranked 100 in Texas and 450 nationally (which is good), that's UNREALISTIC...heck, going D1 is unrealistic.

I hope this helps somebody.
- Coach

Demoneye
07-05-2008, 11:06 AM
if a player becomes a high 4.5+ ntpr in thier junior year in hs. is there chances to get any scholarships at all? if so. how ?:)

Coach Carter
07-05-2008, 06:16 PM
part of a conversation I had today with another coach...

Yep and I enjoy talking college tennis to you because you're educated on it. I actually feel bad for a lot of these kids. They are missing out! I was arrogant too when I was young...as I said in one of my posts...I didn't do a lick of school work because "athletic ability was gonna carry me"...what a joke. I was getting those calls from a east coast D1 (in 87, I graduated in 90) and other big schools. I wanted to go there too, but I stayed ineligible so much from 10th grade on that the coaches stopped calling or writing, no matter the ranking (or the 27 ACT score) I had. I made poor decisions and I try to help these kids not go that route. I was blessed to get a second chance later...to coach. I missed on the FUN, but they don't all have to. There are so many opportunities out there...not scholarship opportunities...but great tennis experience opportunities to be had...all they have to do is look around (or ask for help) and let down that wall of ego and WOW what there is to be found. Most need to look at PRIVATE SCHOOLS...most cost the same in state or out!!! Many kids also get hung up thinking they can't afford college without a scholarship...there are ways to make it happen. We are so dang lucky to live in a country where they let us go to school just about anywhere we want...and don't have to worry about paying until much later.

God bless,
Doug Carter
Head Men's & Women's Tennis Coach
Co-Director of the Solheim Athletic Center
LeTourneau University
903-233-3729 Office
903-720-6265 Cell
dougcarter@letu.edu

Coach Carter
07-05-2008, 06:36 PM
if a player becomes a high 4.5+ ntpr in thier junior year in hs. is there chances to get any scholarships at all? if so. how ?:)

Demoneye...it's hard to get hung up on a 4.5 ntpr...that means so little. What means more is how you handle yourself during adversity in matches. I want to see match results in tournaments...I want to see rankings. If you have amazing strokes but can't win a big match then it's gonna show itself. If you can beat all your local or HS opponents and don't take care of business in USTA tournaments (or aren't playing the USTA tournaments) then you are hurting yourself.

This year at Christmas break my number 3/4 player and my number 8 player took scholarships to play else where. My 3/4 went to a D1 to play 1 or 2 and my 8 went to a D2 and played 1. You can find scholarships, but both those guys didn't enjoy the experience since neither team traveled and neither team had success. The big time feeling ends a week after you get to campus when you see that the team is a joke or you see the spring schedule and realize, "dang we don't ever play". Don't you aspire for your college experience to to be as good but preferably better than HS?

A big piece of advice...the friends we try to impress usually just want to see you succeed...if you go to a D3 and actually play an important role and do great things (all conference or go to the NCAA tournament) and you're happy, then wow...what a statement you've sent. You got a great education and you were a successful college tennis player...that's something to be proud of.

Demoneye...where are you from and what do you hope to do after college (what are you hoping to study)? I'll be glad to help. What kind of grades do you have (how serious are you about your studies)? What kind of team do you want to be part of? What states would you want to live in? Are you ranked on tennisrecruiting.net in your grade? How many stars and what ranking nationally? It's one of the first places I look as a coach. I also do a google search on any "recruit" with their name in "quotes" + tennis ---> if that doesn't draw good results then there's an issue for any good team. I'm a D3, and I realize that on there I need guys ranked in that 300 to 500 range to compete and then I'm still not hanging with the top top teams.

I'll be glad to talk to any of you (and try to help). May be easier though if you email me: dougcarter@letu.edu

Any of you that are looking for a serious, good team where you can be part of something special (in northeastern Texas - between Dallas and Shreveport, LA)...get in touch...we're always looking for that player.

Coach Carter

counter_puncher
07-06-2008, 04:10 PM
Hey coach! Use paragraphs. And capital letters. And full stops.

Note: I see your grammatical skills increase daily. They started with no paragraphs and ... instead of full stops. Then you used paragraphs but forgot capital letters. Now, in your most recent post, you are using great grammar. Even using bold and underline! CONGRATULATIONS!

;)

andfor
07-07-2008, 04:42 AM
Hey coach! Use paragraphs. And capital letters. And full stops.

Note: I see your grammatical skills increase daily. They started with no paragraphs and ... instead of full stops. Then you used paragraphs but forgot capital letters. Now, in your most recent post, you are using great grammar. Even using bold and underline! CONGRATULATIONS!

;)

Coach Carter is helping here more than most any other I've seen. He's the tennis coach, not the English professor!

Keep up the great work Coach Carter!

Thanks,

Julieta
07-07-2008, 02:38 PM
Great post. A girl I was helping out just found a program but if it doesnt work out I may get in touch with you!

jaggy
07-07-2008, 04:47 PM
This has been fascinating, thanks.

meowmix
07-07-2008, 05:38 PM
Hey coach,

Thanks for the posts. They sure have been really interesting.

I've got a question that basically flips the situation you described up there completely around. I'm a 4.00 GPA kid with a 223 PSAT, 2210 SAT. I have a ton of extracurriculars (8 clubs- of those, I'm president of one (also the regional president, going again for state pres next year, and going for national officer next year), officer of another, and captain of two more), been playing the piano since 6, and have more than 200 hrs of volunteer service under my belt. I'm also a member of the class of 2010. Problem is, my tennis, well, for lack of a better term, sucks. I play JV tennis, and play 3rd doubles (there are no JV singles). Our school is considered good (4th in PA or something like that), but still, I'm not that great. Admittedly, I'm getting better, and people think I have a genuine shot at varsity next year, but at the moment, I'm probably just a stronger 3.5-lower 4.0 player. I want to play tennis of some sort in college. I don't think I'll be playing "major tennis", not even D3 (not that I'm saying D3 is bad). What kind of opportunities for tennis do I have in college (apart from playing casually on weekends with friends)?

fridrix
07-07-2008, 06:33 PM
Dear Coach Carter,

What do you think about those older (45ish) ladies Tennis magazine profiled who played for that DIII school in Arizona or somewhere?

kctennis1005
07-07-2008, 06:36 PM
meowmix, i would keep working on the tennis and try to play low level d3 tennis at a great liberal arts college. some of the team are very weak. if u improve a lot u might want to check out mit. their team is not the greatest.

MLoutch
07-07-2008, 06:53 PM
I enjoy seeing the board too...definitely didn't mean to sound like I was venting. I feel like a big part of my job as a D3 coach is educating the good tennis player of the quality of D3 tennis and of school's program. I am always intrigued when I see players that haven't gone to watch the tennis. If they go see the serious schools play, then they will want to play at a D3. It's top notch American tennis. I coach down in Texas, at LeTourneau University. We're always looking for hard working, serious, team guys...we are trying to do incredible things. I'd love to talk to any players looking. I work real hard to make it the experience of a lifetime. LeTourneau is one of the top private engineering and aviation schools in the nation. We have over 60 majors, but we're famous for our engineering and aviation. I can be contacted at: dougcarter@letu.edu

Coach

So glad to see your post - Just before my daughter decided last year she wanted to play Lacrosse in college and not tennis we did visit your campus after her sophmore season she did love the school and the facilities -

If you are interested I will pass your information around at the Zina Garrisson Academy and the Liz Huber Academy here in Houston - We have a bunch of good kids looking to play and develop and I am sure Dr. Wilkerson would love to talk with you on some of the kids coming out of the program.

I have a young one who is in both the Garrisson and Huber Academy and some of our older kids are good enough but may not have the ability (some due to outside circumstances) to get a top national or regional ranking.

Coach Carter
07-08-2008, 02:02 PM
Dear Coach Carter,

What do you think about those older (45ish) ladies Tennis magazine profiled who played for that DIII school in Arizona or somewhere?

Well...to each their own. I guess it's great. We've had an older player from time to time on teams we've played. In guys, it went bad...the older guy (upper 30's) got beat badly...in girls, the older player (upper 40's atleast) was crafty and was real solid...made my girls mad. If it helped the team and if the lady enjoyed it, then great. I would imagine they don't travel much as a team...I could see that causing issues with a "busier" team. I have a real close knit unit...that big of an age gap might be a little awkward.

Coach Carter
07-08-2008, 06:43 PM
Hey coach,

Thanks for the posts. They sure have been really interesting.

I've got a question that basically flips the situation you described up there completely around. I'm a 4.00 GPA kid with a 223 PSAT, 2210 SAT. I have a ton of extracurriculars (8 clubs- of those, I'm president of one (also the regional president, going again for state pres next year, and going for national officer next year), officer of another, and captain of two more), been playing the piano since 6, and have more than 200 hrs of volunteer service under my belt. I'm also a member of the class of 2010. Problem is, my tennis, well, for lack of a better term, sucks. I play JV tennis, and play 3rd doubles (there are no JV singles). Our school is considered good (4th in PA or something like that), but still, I'm not that great. Admittedly, I'm getting better, and people think I have a genuine shot at varsity next year, but at the moment, I'm probably just a stronger 3.5-lower 4.0 player. I want to play tennis of some sort in college. I don't think I'll be playing "major tennis", not even D3 (not that I'm saying D3 is bad). What kind of opportunities for tennis do I have in college (apart from playing casually on weekends with friends)?

Meowmix...sorry, I wasn't avoiding your question. I am totally guessing because I do not know you or your HS team (area) to know the true talent level. There are incredible teams out there where you can be very good and not be a varsity player. In my "area", coaches at both Plano West and Highland Park told me that they each have over 25 superchamps in their programs. On a 6 player team, that's disgusting (in a great way, but sad too)...that you could conceivably be one of the top 100 players (or better) in the state of Texas (a very, very strong junior tennis state) and not make your HS team at all. That is one reason I see so many kids that are say #50 shutting it down after HS. They feel like..."I couldn't make a dent in my HS team...I can't play college tennis". The reality is (and I am not kidding when I say this)...the 4A and 5A team tennis champs in Texas could very potentially win a D1 conference championship and make a nice run in the NCAA's.

Back to you...from all that you said...you have the drive it sounds like to help a ton of teams and to get to play college tennis at many a D3 schools. You just need to do your homework. There are many things I'd probably look for in the school's team...most on here might sound negative and I don't want it to. Let me say this...those things wouldn't be negative if more kids would give college tennis a "real try". What state do you live in? I'd be glad to mention a conference on here after you tell me the state. I could give you the conference website...from there it could get you on the track of looking at schools and doing "homework". Looking at season records and standings...it would give you links to school sites, where you could look at rosters and schedules. Find a school that has what you want to study and that you feel may "fit" you athletically and then go to a match...see what you think..."wow, I could play ___ here"...or "wow, they are good top to bottom...maybe I should look elsewhere". Only you know how you'd feel about that and only you know the challenges that you want to face.

One way or another...if college tennis is a passion of yours, then go for it!!! There is a team that you can play for.

hkem1
07-29-2008, 04:22 PM
Coach carter thank you for all the great information

I have a Question

From what ive been reading on these boards it sounds like Div 2 and 3 coaches dont usually take players from outside their area. Im from florida and want to play college tennis in the western part of the country but wont get calls from big D-1 schools. So do you have any advice.

MTChong
07-29-2008, 06:30 PM
Hey coach,

Thanks for the posts. They sure have been really interesting.

I've got a question that basically flips the situation you described up there completely around. I'm a 4.00 GPA kid with a 223 PSAT, 2210 SAT. I have a ton of extracurriculars (8 clubs- of those, I'm president of one (also the regional president, going again for state pres next year, and going for national officer next year), officer of another, and captain of two more), been playing the piano since 6, and have more than 200 hrs of volunteer service under my belt. I'm also a member of the class of 2010. Problem is, my tennis, well, for lack of a better term, sucks. I play JV tennis, and play 3rd doubles (there are no JV singles). Our school is considered good (4th in PA or something like that), but still, I'm not that great. Admittedly, I'm getting better, and people think I have a genuine shot at varsity next year, but at the moment, I'm probably just a stronger 3.5-lower 4.0 player. I want to play tennis of some sort in college. I don't think I'll be playing "major tennis", not even D3 (not that I'm saying D3 is bad). What kind of opportunities for tennis do I have in college (apart from playing casually on weekends with friends)?

Might not be exactly what you're looking for, and looking down, I see that Coach Carter gave a pretty informative response.

That said, I can share an anecdote with you. I'm pretty much the same was as you -- not as overloaded on clubs -- but similar in that I had some extracurriculars to which I was dedicated, had high marks in school, and did well enough on the standardized tests. Unfortunately, I wasn't that good at tennis. I had a long struggle with tennis elbow from 8th grade onwards, which persists today so I dialed back how much tennis I was playing. That said, sure, I played varsity for a high school team, but we definitely lacked a strong program -- the school didn't even field a JV team. Even so, I'm currently at a school where I can focus on my academics while pursuing other interests such as mock trial and tennis. I certainly don't play varsity here, but play at the club level. We don't get that much court time, but it's still a blast; some weekends, we'll travel to other schools and play matches, which I was not expecting going into it.

Would I want to play varsity if I was good enough? Sure. Am I going to go to a different school just to play varsity tennis? Definitely not, the club team is good enough for me.

10isDad
07-29-2008, 08:01 PM
Dear Coach Carter,

What do you think about those older (45ish) ladies Tennis magazine profiled who played for that DIII school in Arizona or somewhere?

The older lady you speak of is not 45ish, she's 60. She had a great season going 13-5 while playing mostly at #5, was an asset to the team and, because of her age and abilities, was able to bring publicity to the school and program.

The school (Grand Canyon University) is not a D-3 school, it's a D-2 program. The team's coach is a wonderful guy, great teacher, and a good coach. This past year he turned the women's team around big time from a 1-10 record in 2007 to a 9-8 regular season record and a spot in the NCAA tourney in 2008

And for all you aspiring guys, after a long hiatus he's brought men's tennis back to the university starting this coming year.

duso
07-30-2008, 04:27 AM
This is a great thread. My thanks to Coach Carter.

You really need to be realistic in all aspects of college tennis, academics, program, and your ultimate future. One point that doesn't seem to get mentioned is how many good players at the D1 level, quit after a year. Face it, unless you are absolutely great, you are first and foremost a student. I personally know of players that played at D3 that would be at or near the top of any highly competitive D1 program. I will probably misspell the last name, but does the name Eric Douderac ring any bells. Played at Gusdavous in Minnesota, currently a player on the circuit.

The school doesn't matter, the level doesn't matter. If you are great, you're great, if your academically gifted great. If you have a rancid personality neither will matter.

hkem1
07-30-2008, 07:29 AM
10isdad, you sound like you know what your talking so

How is Grand Canyons mens team coming along i noticed on the website that it says spring 2009 when it used to say fall 2008.

10isDad
07-30-2008, 08:58 AM
10isdad, you sound like you know what your talking so

How is Grand Canyons mens team coming along i noticed on the website that it says spring 2009 when it used to say fall 2008.

That I do not know. While I know and greatly respect Greg Prudhomme, we live on opposite sides of the city. My son spent a week with him at a camp a couple weeks ago, but they never really talked about the team too much. I know he has an assistant coach for the men's team - a guy who was ranked as high as #10 in D-II.

Gob_
08-30-2008, 08:52 AM
All I know is if I was a chick and played that 60 year old I'd only hit drop shots. And if she gets to it, a lob. Over and over. Drop shot serves as well.

35ft6
08-30-2008, 01:13 PM
Hey Coach, just for my info., what are the scholarship opportunities at D3, is it similar to D1?On my team, a few guys got merit/academic scholarships based on their tennis. If you know what I mean.

OleNole
09-06-2008, 01:57 PM
I have two recommendations for kids looking to play tennis in college that haven't played singles (or at all) for their high school teams.
1. Sign up for a USTA membership right now and play as many tournaments as you can before you turn 19.
2. Especially if you have the academics in order, consider playing club at a top-notch school. These teams often carry more players and are just as competative as many D3 and D2 squads.

Coach Carter
09-08-2008, 05:16 AM
Coach carter thank you for all the great information

I have a Question

From what ive been reading on these boards it sounds like Div 2 and 3 coaches dont usually take players from outside their area. Im from florida and want to play college tennis in the western part of the country but wont get calls from big D-1 schools. So do you have any advice.

HKEM1 - sorry for the long delay...I haven't been on here for a while! I would suggest looking up schools on the west coast that have the majors you're interested in and start sending some emails to coaches. Tell them you have looked up their school and are interested in coming out. Now, before sending that email, please look at their roster...and do some research to see if you "fit in". If all their top 6 to 8 players are top 150 nationally and you're a player that's 600, then look elsewhere. You will be frustrated otherwise. Good luck.

Coach Carter
09-08-2008, 05:19 AM
On my team, a few guys got merit/academic scholarships based on their tennis. If you know what I mean.

Hey, I am not dumb...there are "leadership scholarships" out there at MANY D3's...many times, it's just a masked athletic scholarship.

Coach Carter
09-08-2008, 05:21 AM
I have two recommendations for kids looking to play tennis in college that haven't played singles (or at all) for their high school teams.
1. Sign up for a USTA membership right now and play as many tournaments as you can before you turn 19.
2. Especially if you have the academics in order, consider playing club at a top-notch school. These teams often carry more players and are just as competative as many D3 and D2 squads.


But if you want to consider playing CLUB TENNIS, then why worry about the other that you mentioned...it's just the same as intramurals...it's "just for fun"...it's not NCAA tennis.

tennis_nerd22
09-28-2008, 07:35 AM
.......................

teppeiahn1
09-28-2008, 08:33 PM
Hey coach! I have a question too. I have been working hard in my HS and I am not trying to get a scholarship. I just want to play NCAA in college. Like you said, there are bunch of colleges that try and don't try. I want to know how to find out if they are serius or not. Is there any site I can check to see the schedule? Also how do I get on the team? Do I have to tryout at some point? If so, what if I don't make it to the team? I want to be garanteed to be in a good team.

Nanshiki
09-29-2008, 08:42 PM
I guess I'll ask for the heck of it, but what's the deal with eligibility for people who have graduated but never played on any sports team when they were in school?

andfor
09-30-2008, 05:37 AM
I guess I'll ask for the heck of it, but what's the deal with eligibility for people who have graduated but never played on any sports team when they were in school?

A student has 5 years from date of H.S. graduation to complete 4 years of college sports. NAIA and NCAA may be different.

cphstennis
01-16-2009, 08:15 AM
Hey coach,

Thanks for the posts. They sure have been really interesting.

I've got a question that basically flips the situation you described up there completely around. I'm a 4.00 GPA kid with a 223 PSAT, 2210 SAT. I have a ton of extracurriculars (8 clubs- of those, I'm president of one (also the regional president, going again for state pres next year, and going for national officer next year), officer of another, and captain of two more), been playing the piano since 6, and have more than 200 hrs of volunteer service under my belt. I'm also a member of the class of 2010. Problem is, my tennis, well, for lack of a better term, sucks. I play JV tennis, and play 3rd doubles (there are no JV singles). Our school is considered good (4th in PA or something like that), but still, I'm not that great. Admittedly, I'm getting better, and people think I have a genuine shot at varsity next year, but at the moment, I'm probably just a stronger 3.5-lower 4.0 player. I want to play tennis of some sort in college. I don't think I'll be playing "major tennis", not even D3 (not that I'm saying D3 is bad). What kind of opportunities for tennis do I have in college (apart from playing casually on weekends with friends)?

what high school? if you dont mind saying. im from pa too

deddied
01-16-2009, 09:38 AM
I work real hard to make it the experience of a lifetime. LeTourneau is one of the top private engineering and aviation schools in the nation. We have over 60 majors, but we're famous for our engineering and aviation. I can be contacted at: dougcarter@letu.edu

wow, i just got a letter from them.

maratsafin5
01-16-2009, 11:59 AM
Mr. Carter, I'm sorry, but from what it seems like to me, you are insincere and are just doing this for money. The advertising of LeTourneau is gettind ridiculous...if you wanted to help people out truly, you would do so by not including the name of the college you coach and making people believe that they're only good enough for D3 when they very well could play D1. Just my two cents, would want to hear what you think.

MIGHTY MANFRED THE WONDER
01-16-2009, 12:26 PM
maratsafin5
Here is what I think, (the Coach having too much class to actually try to figure out your post)-
Sorry, but no one on these boards shares such a childish opinion as yours.

The fact that Coach Carter has the guts to back up his statements and very helpful insights with his name says a lot about him; Just as your post says about you.

I don't think there is one poster who desires to be a "college bound player" on these threads who has not appreciated the Coach's time and effort writing, patiently answering questions, and yes, EDUCATING numbskulls who have no idea what they are talking about in the world of college tennis.

I think he has been an invaluable asset on a board loaded mostly with smoke and gas.

anbu4ever11
01-16-2009, 02:17 PM
Is it bad for myself to go on a d3 school that will basically accept anyone if my goal is to just get on a team with a acedemic scholarship and just play my heart out.i have no usta membership and will get one eventually but i dont think it will help by the time i start college.im a senior right now.i just reall want to get on and play and if i find the team isnt worth it and i can get in somewhere else i would but is it bad for me to do this right away?

Joeyg
01-17-2009, 05:59 AM
Good luck preparing for the essay portion of your college application. Your writing skills are abominable! I can barely understand what you are trying to say. Try English next time.

anbu4ever11
01-18-2009, 06:10 PM
Good luck preparing for the essay portion of your college application. Your writing skills are abominable! I can barely understand what you are trying to say. Try English next time.



I like how you come from sarcasm usa lol thats funny.