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5263
07-22-2008, 08:01 AM
Wonder how many of the arm problems associated with polys (and other syns) come from hitting with them long past their useful life, after they have lost play and become dead?

I was thinking about this last nite as I was pounding the last life out of my BBO hybrid, which had a string ready to pop on any stroke. I realized how much bigger my cuts had to be and I was still not getting the power of a fresh set.

So I'm swinging harder and with strings that have lost most of their play and feel sort of dead. Guess that is a recipe for a sore arm? Probably on the order of 4-5 times the regular stress?

Nickb, I know you have had some arm problems. Do you or others have an opinion on this?

5263
07-22-2008, 10:05 AM
IS this just too obvious?

YULitle
07-22-2008, 12:33 PM
I image that this is probably the case.

But, I still hold firm that the majority of TE problems come from poor form.

mitchell_ota
07-22-2008, 03:11 PM
I've had a set of very dead poly strings in my racquet, and hitting with it was a recipe for a very sore arm. The total lack of pop made me take gigantic cuts at the ball, which in turn created some really bad form. It left me with a pretty sore arm. Needless to say, I cut those strings out, put new strings in, and all was good again.

A dead poly is pretty stiff and does transmit a lot of shock to your arm. I still think that if you have it in a relatively light (less than 11 oz) and pretty stiff racquet, then things will be even worse, since light and stiff racquets don't absorb shock, but send it right down your arm and into your elbow. Bad form along with that will only make it worse faster.

5263
07-22-2008, 03:39 PM
I image that this is probably the case.

But, I still hold firm that the majority of TE problems come from poor form.

No doubt you are right about that, but as the post after you confirms, taking those bigger cuts can affect form as well.

strike
07-23-2008, 10:50 AM
I think form plays a part...but there is no way that mechanics account for it all. You have to take into account strings and racquet alongside one's form to really diagnose it correctly.

There is no question a Babolat Pure Drive Plus with a full bed of Luxilon BB Original at 64 lbs is going to effect people's arms very differently than a Pro Kennex Redondo strung with a full bed of VS Gut at 58 lbs.

Put those two sticks in the hands of people with exquisite form, some will be fine...but others will be sidelined for a week nursing their elbow after playing 2 sets with the PD+, and most will be ready to play 5 with the Redondo.

5263
07-23-2008, 12:04 PM
I think form plays a part...but there is no way that mechanics account for it all. You have to take into account strings and racquet alongside one's form to really diagnose it correctly.

There is no question a Babolat Pure Drive Plus with a full bed of Luxilon BB Original at 64 lbs is going to effect people's arms very differently than a Pro Kennex Redondo strung with a full bed of VS Gut at 58 lbs.

Put those two sticks in the hands of people with exquisite form, some will be fine...but others will be sidelined for a week nursing their elbow after playing 2 sets with the PD+, and most will be ready to play 5 with the Redondo.

That observation surely seems to be accurate. Seems to be about a 50-50 proposition, give or take.

strike
07-24-2008, 05:20 AM
I would also say there is a third component as well...one's arm...which was inherent in my answer actually...

Everyone's is different; from muscle mass, tendon strength, flexibility, joint health, age, bone mass, etc.

There is a reason each racquet feels different to different people, and thus there is a reason some racquets cause TE in some but not others. Some of the reason is technique, but the racquet/string combo and one's arm also plays just as an important part.

I guess my point is it is a complicated combination of things that combine to cause TE...not just one thing, such as form which many seem to suggest, that you can blankedly say is the issue.