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View Full Version : Advice needed about k-factor 90 Tour


artdrucker
07-27-2008, 07:41 AM
I began playing with wood rackets in the early 70's and reached a 4.5 level. Now entertaining the idea of returning to tennis after twenty years, I tried the k-factor 90 Tour and loved it. It seems perfect for those who played with wood racquets and developed a classic style. But I am constantly told this stick is only for players in tip top condition, which is not my case. For which specific reasons should I be concerned about using the k-factor 90 Tour?

drakulie
07-27-2008, 07:45 AM
None. If you liked it, then don't worry about what people say. Let them worry about getting thier *** kicked by you and your k90 on the court.

TonyB
07-27-2008, 08:26 AM
My advice is to at least play one or two long matches (3 sets or more) with a demo or a used racquet to see if you can wield it long-term. I'm in pretty good shape myself and I definitely get tired after maybe two sets with the K90. I don't get nearly as tired with my RDS 001 mid, as a comparison. It can be a very demanding racquet.

If you find yourself playing well with the K90, then consider doing some conditioning and strength training to get yourself into shape enough to play longer matches with it. I simply haven't made that commitment yet, so I'm sticking with my RDS 001 mids for now.

Good luck.

artdrucker
07-27-2008, 01:32 PM
Thank you Drakulie and TonyB. I will try it for about two hours and see how my arm feels.

quest01
07-27-2008, 01:44 PM
I don't think it's a good idea. If your returning from Tennis after 20 years then you should consider using a racquet that isn't quite as demanding as the K90. I think once you develop yourself at the 4.0-4.5 level again then consider switching to the K90 but at this point use a racquet that is less demanding maybe an oversize racquet to start and then work your way down in head size. I just don't think it would be a wise or smart decision to all of as sudden start playing again with one of the more demanding racquets on the market if you haven't played in 20 years.

NoBadMojo
07-27-2008, 01:46 PM
For which specific reasons should I be concerned about using the k-factor 90 Tour?

=small sweetzone

=heavy so hard to swing fast especially in draining conditions when playing decent opponents

=could possibly become injured due to the weight and stiffness and small sweetzone

=racquet is not good to play defense with

=if you play someone bettrer than you who hits harder than you, you will constanly be playing defense and coughing up misshits and weak shots which are easily exploited

=federer only uses a pj of this racquet

=the game has changed a lot in the last 20 years

=the specs are all over the place

=the paint jobs are inferior

=your game will likely stagnate or become worse and you will get passsed by by others using more reasonable gear

2nd_Serve
07-27-2008, 02:18 PM
People on this forum like to scare people. I've been kept away by my K90 for too long. People are always saying the headsize is too small, it's too heavy. IT'S NOT. You'll get used to the headsize in a few minutes, and the weight isn't a problem if you work hard with the racket.

chiru
07-27-2008, 02:40 PM
i play with a ps 85 (same general down points wrt k90). i agree, that when you're playing a much better opponent, it makes me look pretty silly. the problem is, when i'm playing a worse opponent than I am, my racket helps to ensure a victory imo by giving me a ton of control and feel. it doesn't give you that extra margin you need when you're playing someone much better than you to give you a fighting chance, but im one of these players that's more concerned about making sure they ALWAYS beat the players they should beat.

furthermore, my ps 85 is my best serving stick by far that i have ever tried. i've yet to get more SHEER POWER from a racket than from the ps 85 with my relaxed (not very jerky or forced) service motion. i have no idea why that is, and ppl are free to disagree with me, but that's my individual opinion. my serve is my best shot, so typically that gives me the best shot to make competitive matches against ppl much better than me anyhow.

artdrucker
07-27-2008, 03:27 PM
Thanks to all for your comments. The disagreement between you is quite interesting. I am a bit more scared now, mainly because of potential injury. The other aspects don't worry me that much since I think I would enjoy gradually improving my game with this racquet. With respect to it being heavy, don't you guys think that because its higher mass absorbs more shock, if you have the correct mechanics it is safer (e.g. for avoiding tennis-elbow) than a lighter stick?

Ian Stewart
07-27-2008, 04:31 PM
Thanks to all for your comments. The disagreement between you is quite interesting. I am a bit more scared now, mainly because of potential injury. The other aspects don't worry me that much since I think I would enjoy gradually improving my game with this racquet. With respect to it being heavy, don't you guys think that because its higher mass absorbs more shock, if you have the correct mechanics it is safer (e.g. for avoiding tennis-elbow) than a lighter stick?

What you are experiencing here is a bit of internecine strife. NoBadMojo and BreakPoint are interesting in their own right. But put them together and well... a long standing disagreement surfaces. :twisted:

Drakulie and TonyB are wise. In truth the only reasonable 'blind' advice anyone can give you is to try the racquet and see what happens. If your arm aches after serving three sets then you either need to try something else or commit to bulking up. If not, great. Enjoy!

For reference I use a K95 16x18 and I love it.

jasonbourne
07-27-2008, 06:09 PM
artdrucker, if what you say is true about your tennis in the 70s and you loved the K90 when you tried it, then it is a good sign you can learn to be more comfortable and confident with the racket.

As TonyB mentioned you need to be a serious and committed player of the game to continue to wield the racket for recreation or competition. Develop the footwork and speed. I also agree with your concern about higher mass in a racket absorbs more shock.

As drakulie mentioned once you get going with the K90 your tennis buddies or opponents will stop giving you 'discouraging advice'. :)

drakulie
07-27-2008, 06:19 PM
With respect to it being heavy, don't you guys think that because its higher mass absorbs more shock, if you have the correct mechanics it is safer (e.g. for avoiding tennis-elbow) than a lighter stick?

Absolutely correct. Typically, injury is due to poor mechanics>>> not equipment.

I live in a tennis club with 23 courts. There are all sorts of players there, from beginner to pro. (Mariano Puerta and Dementiava) to name a few have been staying there working on there games. I've posted videos of them on my youtube account.

Puerta
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5zumFYO8u70

Elena:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mF4tWB5BPvQ

Anyway, most people who experience arm pain are using light, powerful, oversize sticks. They have horrible technique, and when they are on the court look like they are gearing up for battle in the front lines of Iraq. They put on so many gimmicks on their arms, wrists, biceps etc. they are constantly looking for a "quick fix" by switching to an "arm-friendly" frame, when all they have to do is correct their mechanics.

Only way you will ever find out if the frame is for you, is by giving it a try out. Don't be swayed by morons on these boards. None of them are going to play tennis for you.

Good Luck

anirut
07-27-2008, 06:34 PM
I was playing some fun doubles matches the past Saturday. I was out there weilding and having fun with my PK Redondo mid.

Then, in the middle of the match, I just decided to bring out my beloved Wilson Sting SC -- yes, 85 sq.in. -- I was thrashing the ball the way it was meant to be.

My doubles partner commented: "Bro, you are playing better with this stick."

Now, go figure about "old style".

I'm not saying that one should stick to old school or move on with the new school. What I want to say is:

"Play what feels best to you."

We amatures are not playing to feed the family anyway. If heavier sticks hurt you, then change. If not, and you're comfortable, then why change?

My 0.02.

VGP
07-27-2008, 06:46 PM
I began playing with wood rackets in the early 70's and reached a 4.5 level. Now entertaining the idea of returning to tennis after twenty years, I tried the k-factor 90 Tour and loved it. It seems perfect for those who played with wood racquets and developed a classic style. But I am constantly told this stick is only for players in tip top condition, which is not my case. For which specific reasons should I be concerned about using the k-factor 90 Tour?

There's your answer......

anirut
07-27-2008, 06:55 PM
Funny thing is when I play a lower level player or a pusher, I have found it more difficult to play with a 90.

I find it to be so too. I also have a granny stick in my bag for such circumstances.

VGP
07-27-2008, 07:03 PM
artdrucker - as you can see you've kinda opened up one of the classic worm cans of the board......playing with "midsized" frames.

joeellis
07-27-2008, 07:35 PM
I began playing with wood rackets in the early 70's and reached a 4.5 level. Now entertaining the idea of returning to tennis after twenty years, I tried the k-factor 90 Tour and loved it. It seems perfect for those who played with wood racquets and developed a classic style. But I am constantly told this stick is only for players in tip top condition, which is not my case. For which specific reasons should I be concerned about using the k-factor 90 Tour?

I come from a similar situation. I played as a teen/early 20's with wood racquets and gave the game up for a long time. I have recently started playing again. I didn't try the K 90 for a while because most everyone on this site discouraged people below a certain level (which I currently am @ 3.5). I was in a big retail store that had an indoor court and tried the racquet just for kicks. It felt better than anything I had tried to that point, so I bought 2.

While I agree that it takes some work to feel comfortable with, I truly feel that with work, you can definatly use this stick. One thing I've done is buy a few old wood racquets and practice with them. The small sweet spot and weight really have helped me adjust to the K 90. As a matter of fact, on ground strokes and serves, I really don't have much problem with the wood racquets. On service returns and volleys, the wood racquets are more difficult to use.

Also, I believe in a fairly short amount of time, just playing with the K 90 will build strength. Not saying you will not need to do more, but you will become more focused. I don't like the idea of starting out with the light oversize if your desire is to eventually play with a players racquet. I think these type of racquets may cause you to become lazy with your strokes. Also, many oversize racquets are head heavy, which in my experience will lead to elbow problems more than a heavy HL racquet. Just my opinion. Good luck.

Kaptain Karl
07-27-2008, 07:49 PM
<Mod Mode> Troll posts cleaned off. Take it to e-mails if you want to continue that age-old argument. Thank you. </Mod Mode>
______________

artdrucker - I'd suggest you just make sure you do try a variety of DEMO frames before you commit to one. (I'm 52 next month, so I'm of your "era". And I returned to tennis after a 20-year "sabbatical" ... almost nine years ago. I wish I'd thought to ask a question like yours before I bought....)

IMO, the k90 "evokes" the feel of the woodies we remember. (For me the k90 plays "kind of dead" compared to most modern frames; it also has a pretty small sweet spot if you ask me.)

I'm a HS Coach and I am *very* protective of the frames my kids play with. Last year my top JV boy changed frames: He demoed several I recommended and didn't like them. Then I told him to "get wild" and demo Mids / OS / Babolats (which I generally advise against for youngsters) / etc.

He's playing with the k90 [Gasp!] and playing better than with the frames I recommended. (Sorry for the long story.)

Moral: Play with what you like. We "experts" can only point you in some general directions....

- KK

tennis_hand
07-27-2008, 08:09 PM
it depends on how good you are and who you play with.

spkyEngrish
07-27-2008, 08:45 PM
it depends on how good you are and who you play with.

Exactly. What's your goal? If you're gonna go out once a week and hit nice, lazy rallies or play a couple of easy sets with an obliging partner, then the K90 will work well. Absolutely nothing wrong with that.

If you're 100% obsessed with winning friendly matches and/or jumping into tourneys, then you better be honest with yourself about conditioning. The US K90 is a demanding frame to use for multiple sets of all-out tennis.

baek57
07-27-2008, 09:34 PM
you wont beat tougher opponents no matter what frame you use. the most important thing is to find a racquet you enjoy playing with. since you said you loved it, then this racquet is for you imo.

artdrucker
07-28-2008, 01:46 AM
Exactly. What's your goal? If you're gonna go out once a week and hit nice, lazy rallies or play a couple of easy sets with an obliging partner, then the K90 will work well. Absolutely nothing wrong with that.

If you're 100% obsessed with winning friendly matches and/or jumping into tourneys, then you better be honest with yourself about conditioning. The US K90 is a demanding frame to use for multiple sets of all-out tennis.

That's also an important point. Enjoying and gradually improving my game are my priorities. Competing hard I think will not happen often and will surely not happen soon. So, I am definitely going to try this stick for some long sets and see how my arm feels afterwards.

wetmartini
07-28-2008, 02:54 AM
you could try the asian version which is reasonably lighter - i think 11.3 ounces unstrung. i live in Korea and i've tried both the Asian and U.S. versions of the K90 - they feel very, very similar though the U.S. version definitely felt a bit more stable and had more "plow through." which is not to say that the Asian version did not feel stable or have any plow through. just less in comparision.

Rabbit
07-28-2008, 08:59 AM
If you hit the ball in the middle of the strings on a consistent basis, it really doesn't matter what head size it is.

My personal 6-month experience with the Wilson Tour 90 was that it was too heavy and to evenly balanced for me. I think it's more lumber than the original ProStaff which I can comfortably play with. Further, it is more lumber than a Head Vilas which I also played with not too long ago. Bottom line, while I liked the frame, it just wasn't for me. But then again, that's me, not you. With regard to the objectives of the frame, I think it is a fine frame and made to tolerances as close as any other by any other manufacturer.

I go back and forth on head size. I am a long time C10 user which is 98 square inches. However, I am currently enamored with the Dunlop AG100 which is 90 inches. If you hold them up, there is not much difference in the head size.

I do not find the AG100 to be too taxing. After regionals this year, I decided I need something less demanding than the C10. That frame has turned out to be the AG100 which has a smaller head, but also is lighter static weight and swingweight. It also addresses an area of my game which I found I was being over worked on by with the C10/poly; the serve. So, it looks to be a win/win situation for me.

While these boards are of great help, the final arbitor for any equipment change has to be you...