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dcottrill
08-01-2008, 05:33 AM
...from Clarence Bass.

http://www.cbass.com/IntervalsEveryone.htm

Rickson
08-01-2008, 06:00 AM
High intensity's the way to go!

Il Mostro
08-01-2008, 07:31 AM
Was this ever in doubt?

chess9
08-01-2008, 08:04 AM
Ooh, nice find!

My only objection would be to recommend intervals after a base period of slow running/biking/rowing, etc. to avoid injury and burnout.

-Robert

cncretecwbo
08-01-2008, 04:20 PM
from a health standpoint and athletic performance standpoint, HIIT is great..

purely for weight management, its not much better than low intensity cardio.

iradical18
08-01-2008, 09:21 PM
from a health standpoint and athletic performance standpoint, HIIT is great..

purely for weight management, its not much better than low intensity cardio.

All of the evidence I've seen posted here before is opposite of what you just said.

cncretecwbo
08-02-2008, 06:24 AM
All of the evidence I've seen posted here before is opposite of what you just said.

well the EPOC idea is true, but not significantly so

Also

In another study, Gore et al. (1990) examined the effect of both intensity and duration on EPOC. Participants consisted of nine males with an average of 21 years of age. Participants exercised at 30 %, 50 %, and 70 % V02 max, each at 20, 50, and 80 minute durations. The effect of duration on exercise found no significant difference in the 30 % V02 max condition, whose 8 hour EPOC was a little over 1 liter of 02, amounting to approximately 5-6 extra calories metabolized. The effect of duration on the 50 % V02 max condition found that EPOC went from approximately 3 liters at 20 minutes, to 5 liters at 50 minutes, and finally to 6 liters at 80 minutes of duration. The effect of duration on the 70% V02 max condition found that EPOC went from 6, to 10, and finally 14.6 liters of 02 consumed for 20, 50, and 80 minute durations. As a reference the 14.6 liters of 02 consumed in excess in the 70 % V02 max, 80 minute duration condition was approximately 70 extra calories of energy expended or approximately 40 extra calories than the 50 minute condition at 50 minutes duration. While the data from this study clearly shows a positive relationship between intensity and duration on EPOC, the amount of calories metabolized in excess is concluded by the authors to be ? of little physiological significance for weight loss?? Further, the average amount of calories metabolized during EPOC was approximately 4 % of the total energy cost of exercise, which addresses the statement that , ?the majority of calories burned will come after your workout( Phillips)!

HIIT oxidizes an insignificant amount of calories more then even low intensity via EPOC...

Atleast from the information I have

The above statement paints an appealing picture. In reality however, the scientific evidence suggests that it is unequivocally false (Laforgia et al., 1997, Gore and Withers, 1990, Freedman-Akabas, 1985). First, HIIT training is normally purported to take less time than lower intensity sessions. However, to control variables Laforgia et al. (1997) examined the effect of intensity on EPOC, while matching total work performed in each session. Participants consisted of eight male middle distance runners, who performed 30 minutes of 70 % V02 max treadmill running in condition one, and interval training in condition two. Interval training consisted of 20, one minute sprints at 105 % of V02 max. The session lasted 60 minutes, as sprints were interspersed with 2 minute intervals in which participants performed active recovery. It was found that the 70 % V02 max condition metabolized 31 extra calories over the entire nine hours following exercise, while the high intensity condition metabolized 64 extra calories as extrapolated by EPOC. This equates to a negligible 33 extra calories for the high intensity condition. Laforgia et al. (1997) suggests that a comparison of the excess calories above moderate intensity exercise ‘for the interval treatment is of little physiological significance to the energy balance of athletes because this amount of energy is equivalent to the kilojoules in only 75 ml of orange juice (1/3rd cup).’ They further conclude that ‘the major contribution of both treatments to weight loss was via the energy expended during the actual exercise. The excess post exercise energy expenditure is therefore of negligible physiological significance as far as weight loss is concerned.’

So yes , the idea that you're going to burn several hundred calories after HIIT is basically a myth...