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chess9
08-13-2008, 01:14 PM
http://www.time.com/time/health/article/0,8599,1832033,00.html

"For avid runners, more good news: the study found no significant difference between the condition of joints in pavement pounders and their more sedentary peers. Looking at X-rays and arthritis rates, Chakravarty says, "there was clearly no difference."

-Robert

sn1974
08-18-2008, 12:55 AM
yes, and runners also live longer and have fewer disabilities...

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=93632987

superman1
08-18-2008, 01:52 AM
So I guess even though sprinting may have the best athletic benefits for sports, long distance running has more health benefits.

cncretecwbo
08-18-2008, 05:51 AM
So I guess even though sprinting may have the best athletic benefits for sports, long distance running has more health benefits.

for men.....

dont women have basic physiological features that make running a lot harder on the body?

chess9
08-18-2008, 06:16 AM
for men.....

dont women have basic physiological features that make running a lot harder on the body?

There are dangers for women in very intense training, particularly hard distance running. Hormonal imbalances, lost period (some women might not be troubled with that one), bone issues, hip and knee issues. Ano posted an article about this a few months ago. A search would retrieve it, I'm sure. ;) He isn't a big fan of running.

If you are a woman who is running only for fitness, and doing, say, 20 miles per week or less of low to moderate intensity training, I'd say you are much less likely to have problems. All the runners and triathlete females I've known who've had 'issues' around their running were doing high mileages, plus intervals.

These are just my views, and are probably wrong, as usual. ;)

-Robert

cncretecwbo
08-18-2008, 04:04 PM
There are dangers for women in very intense training, particularly hard distance running. Hormonal imbalances, lost period (some women might not be troubled with that one), bone issues, hip and knee issues. Ano posted an article about this a few months ago. A search would retrieve it, I'm sure. ;) He isn't a big fan of running.

If you are a woman who is running only for fitness, and doing, say, 20 miles per week or less of low to moderate intensity training, I'd say you are much less likely to have problems. All the runners and triathlete females I've known who've had 'issues' around their running were doing high mileages, plus intervals.

These are just my views, and are probably wrong, as usual. ;)

-Robert

wow i just realized my post suggested im a woman... im actually a guy...

10sfreak
08-18-2008, 05:03 PM
There are dangers for women in very intense training, particularly hard distance running. Hormonal imbalances, lost period (some women might not be troubled with that one), bone issues, hip and knee issues. Ano posted an article about this a few months ago. A search would retrieve it, I'm sure. ;) He isn't a big fan of running.

If you are a woman who is running only for fitness, and doing, say, 20 miles per week or less of low to moderate intensity training, I'd say you are much less likely to have problems. All the runners and triathlete females I've known who've had 'issues' around their running were doing high mileages, plus intervals.

These are just my views, and are probably wrong, as usual. ;)

-Robert
I think the problems women have that you're referring to stem not so much from running per se, but from their bodyfal levels getting too low. Once a woman's BF levels get too low, they have a hard time producing hormones (hormones are made from cholesterol) - once the hormones are out of whack, the body starts developing all sorts of problems.
Btw, this happens with men too, but our BF threshold to produce these adverse results is quite a bit lower.

MomentumGT
08-18-2008, 05:14 PM
http://www.time.com/time/health/article/0,8599,1832033,00.html

"For avid runners, more good news: the study found no significant difference between the condition of joints in pavement pounders and their more sedentary peers. Looking at X-rays and arthritis rates, Chakravarty says, "there was clearly no difference."

-Robert

I don't know if there clearly is no difference from running on pavement or not, but when I up the running from 3x a week 2 miles a day to 4x a week my knees start getting some pains. Not hardcore pains where I can't walk but a slight pain none the less. My knees also "pop" more readily when i bend them, ie like popping your knuckles. If I'm on the treadmill the pains are almost non-existent.

The good thing is that I've lost a total of 22lbs since Jan. of this year but I'm still nowhere close to my college playing weight of 170lbs. Sorry to hijack the thread but maybe the more experience runners can give me some pointers, thanks.

-Jon

ps I have descent shoes, RBK Boston Fury's

Topaz
08-18-2008, 05:23 PM
I think the problems women have that you're referring to stem not so much from running per se, but from their bodyfal levels getting too low. Once a woman's BF levels get too low, they have a hard time producing hormones (hormones are made from cholesterol) - once the hormones are out of whack, the body starts developing all sorts of problems.
Btw, this happens with men too, but our BF threshold to produce these adverse results is quite a bit lower.

You're correct. Once the body fat gets too low, women will not menstruate (as the body feels it is not capable of sustaining a fetus) and hormones will generally just get all screwed up. You see this a lot with female runners and gymnasts.

And, if body fat is too high, essentially the same thing happens.

Though the article that chess is referring to (that Ano posted a long time ago) raised some good points, but Ano was completely against women running, and some of us had a problem with that! ;)

Topaz
08-18-2008, 05:26 PM
I don't know if there clearly is no difference from running on pavement or not, but when I up the running from 3x a week 2 miles a day to 4x a week my knees start getting some pains. Not hardcore pains where I can't walk but a slight pain none the less. My knees also "pop" more readily when i bend them, ie like popping your knuckles. If I'm on the treadmill the pains are almost non-existent.

The good thing is that I've lost a total of 22lbs since Jan. of this year but I'm still nowhere close to my college playing weight of 170lbs. Sorry to hijack the thread but maybe the more experience runners can give me some pointers, thanks.

-Jon

ps I have descent shoes, RBK Boston Fury's

Ok, but when is the last time you changed your shoes? If you haven't changed them since January, then it is time. The cushioning wears out, and you feel it in your joints! (well, at least I do!)

And just because the shoes are 'decent', you may want to investigate whether or not it is the shoe for *you*! Do you have a high, low, or medium arch? Are you heavy or lighter? Do you pronate, supinate, or walk/run in a neutral position? All of this makes a difference in the shoe that will work best for you.

MomentumGT
08-18-2008, 05:47 PM
Ok, but when is the last time you changed your shoes? If you haven't changed them since January, then it is time. The cushioning wears out, and you feel it in your joints! (well, at least I do!)

And just because the shoes are 'decent', you may want to investigate whether or not it is the shoe for *you*! Do you have a high, low, or medium arch? Are you heavy or lighter? Do you pronate, supinate, or walk/run in a neutral position? All of this makes a difference in the shoe that will work best for you.

I over did the mileage on my New Balance when I first started running. The RBK's are fairly new, maybe 20 miles on them. As far as body weight I'm on the heavy side. I quite tennis 6 years ago and have been lifting weights ever since, think football player with a gut. LOL. I'm flat footed and pronate when I run.

I hate running but I do it because it has to be done. LOL. If anyone can help me out and make it more bearable that would be great.

-Jon

Rickson
08-18-2008, 05:50 PM
Running is very good for the heart.

Topaz
08-18-2008, 05:52 PM
I over did the mileage on my New Balance when I first started running. The RBK's are fairly new, maybe 20 miles on them. As far as body weight I'm on the heavy side. I quite tennis 6 years ago and have been lifting weights ever since, think football player with a gut. LOL. I'm flat footed and pronate when I run.

I hate running but I do it because it has to be done. LOL. If anyone can help me out and make it more bearable that would be great.

-Jon

Ok...sounds like you know what you're doing with the shoes! It is always the first thing that I ask, as shoes made a huge difference for me with some ITBS problems I had a few years ago.

Make sure you have plenty of cushioning. Sometimes, to get more life out of my shoes, I switch out the insoles with new ones.

Honestly, if you don't enjoy running, then why do it? Find something that you look forward to and enjoy! My running is my 'alone' time with my music, and I crave it if I go too long with out it. I don't run for time, just distance, and I don't care how long it takes me to get it done! :)

Venetian
08-18-2008, 09:25 PM
I over did the mileage on my New Balance when I first started running. The RBK's are fairly new, maybe 20 miles on them. As far as body weight I'm on the heavy side. I quite tennis 6 years ago and have been lifting weights ever since, think football player with a gut. LOL. I'm flat footed and pronate when I run.

I hate running but I do it because it has to be done. LOL. If anyone can help me out and make it more bearable that would be great.

-Jon

You posted on the difference you feel in your knees running on pavement vs softer surfaces. IMO the culprit is probably your weight. If you were to get back down to the weight you're hoping to, I'm willing to bet you wouldn't have any more trouble running on pavement.

wyutani
08-18-2008, 09:27 PM
running cures insomnia. i am prove of that.:twisted:

MomentumGT
08-19-2008, 11:46 AM
Make sure you have plenty of cushioning. Sometimes, to get more life out of my shoes, I switch out the insoles with new ones.

Honestly, if you don't enjoy running, then why do it? Find something that you look forward to and enjoy! My running is my 'alone' time with my music, and I crave it if I go too long with out it. I don't run for time, just distance, and I don't care how long it takes me to get it done! :)

I'll try the aftermarket insoles and see if that makes a considerable difference, thanks for the tip. The ones in my RBK's look cheap and flimsy.

I started running because of my dogs. I have 3 game bred pitbulls and if we don't run 2 miles in the morning and a mile before dusk 3x a week and also walk the same distance the rest of the week, they get really restless and eventually tear into each other. Neutering helped with the aggression but to keep them happy and together in 1 pack they have to work and be tired.

When I got back into tennis running helped me re-gain most of my tennis game back and the more I run the better I play. I also believe its the reason I've lost weight with a mediocre diet. LOL. Weight lifting is my 'alone time'. Even tho I don't like running its proven to be beneficial in a lot of areas so I keep plugging away. Thanks for the tips.

-Jon

Topaz
08-19-2008, 11:58 AM
I'll try the aftermarket insoles and see if that makes a considerable difference, thanks for the tip. The ones in my RBK's look cheap and flimsy.

-Jon

Pretty much all insoles that come with shoes are worth being replaced! There are a lot out there to choose from, too, so don't get overwhelmed!