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j4s0nx09
08-30-2008, 08:49 AM
i've always wondered... whats the thing on federers bottom grommet?? and what does it do??

Automatix
08-30-2008, 08:51 AM
Powerpads do a search... it's been discussed many times.

j4s0nx09
08-30-2008, 08:51 AM
any one????

shavenyak
08-30-2008, 10:22 AM
any one????

He just said: POWERPADS

Kind of a throwback to the woodie days.

WHSTENNIS
08-30-2008, 10:39 AM
pics??????

drakulie
08-30-2008, 10:51 AM
Here you go. Provided by Edberg505:

Here you go...

http://i10.tinypic.com/4ic6xac.jpg


http://i10.tinypic.com/495y0j6.jpg

drakulie
08-31-2008, 09:36 AM
You could just make them. They are leather.

BTW, they don't add any power. They do dampen the string bed though.

ps2dcgba
08-31-2008, 05:03 PM
Hi,
That looks pretty interesting, never seen that before, I have a question, do you have to change the power pads each time you use a fresh string job? How long do power pads last? Thanks!

drakulie
08-31-2008, 05:27 PM
^^^ No. You keep using the same ones. You just have to place them on when doing a string job. They last a long effen time. I've never had to replace mine due to wear.

Go to a store where they sell leather strips, and just cut the peices. You could also use a old leather belt, etc.

roger nadal
08-31-2008, 07:06 PM
thats awesome im about to start using those

PBODY99
09-01-2008, 04:10 AM
In the wood frame days, they were commonly used to soften the curve a string had to make on the frame, I still have some Lexan ones from "back in the day". When in college we save our worn out leather grips to cut up for power pads. A craft store that sells rawhide brides is an easy current source. You could even use the leftover scrap of current replacement grips.

Applesauceman
09-01-2008, 07:58 PM
Powerpads do a search... it's been discussed many times.

He's/she's a New User. Maybe he/she doesn't know how to use the Search function yet.

MEAC_ALLAMERICAN
09-01-2008, 08:14 PM
That's what they are, I demoed a racket the other day and therer were a few of those in the racket. :oops:

My bad. :?

Ketsugo
09-03-2008, 03:15 PM
They add NO POWER or shock absorption, just to protect the racquet. Not really necessary on today's racquets.

shavenyak
09-03-2008, 03:19 PM
The whole point of power pads was to smooth out the sharp double 90 degree angles on wooden rackets of yore to keep NATURAL GUT from snapping at those kinks. They're not necessary on todays rackets as Ketsugo says. Especially since most of them play with Poly now.

Edit: What Pbody99 said is spot on.

JW10S
09-03-2008, 03:29 PM
These used to be very common on the men's and women's pro tours when gut was the primary string of choice. Aside from under the bridge many players would also put some on the last strings on the shoulder and a few players even put them at the top of the frame. As stated above they give no additional power or dampening to the racquet or stringbed. They were/are used so the gut doesn't have to go through such a severe bend in and out of the string holes. Nowadays the grommets on the bridge are often rounded and thus serve the same purpose.

drakulie
09-03-2008, 06:03 PM
They add NO POWER or shock absorption, just to protect the racquet. Not really necessary on today's racquets.

I agree they add no power. However, they do add significant absorption.

Ketsugo
09-05-2008, 04:50 PM
I agree they add no power. However, they do add significant absorption.

As much as a traditional dampener? Or any additional dampening used with a dampener? Sorry if I misspoke.

LPShanet
09-05-2008, 10:24 PM
As much as a traditional dampener? Or any additional dampening used with a dampener? Sorry if I misspoke.

The simple answer is nowhere near as much as you perceive with a traditional dampener, and some would say there isn't any such effect. The more technical answer is that shock and vibration are different things. Drakulie mentions shock, which has to do with the impact of the ball on the racquet. There may be some small effect on shock from the power pads, although it would be tough to measure. A vibration dampener affects the vibration/sound of the string movement (much like a guitar being strummed). So, as stated in posts 16 and 17, you didn't really misspeak at all.