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View Full Version : Thomas Muster's racket in this picture


rosen88
08-31-2008, 12:54 AM
Which Kneissl racket is this? (Or is it a PT630 pj)

http://img153.imageshack.us/img153/6141/thomas20musterbf3.jpg (http://imageshack.us)

orangettecoleman
08-31-2008, 08:36 AM
it's a kneissl tom's reach machine.
http://www.sportal.de/tennis/images/equipment/schlaegertest/tomsmachine.jpg
14 oz, head heavy.
isospeed professional 17g string at around 80 or 85 lbs (!).

Pro_Tour_630
08-31-2008, 01:16 PM
it is a first generation toms machine with 21 cross and above photo is not the same it is a 2nd generation toms with 20 cross and different beam

roger nadal
08-31-2008, 07:10 PM
wow that looks like the new adidas barricade racquet

Rabbit
09-01-2008, 10:23 AM
Or is it a 280 painted? At one point, Muster was asked how he liked his 'new' racket. He replied that it was the same racket with new paint.

adidasman
09-03-2008, 12:40 PM
Thomas Muster was, at this time, playing with a Pro Tour 280 painted to look like a Kneissl Toms Machine. He admitted it in an interview before the US Open that year; he had just signed with Kneissl and was asked about changing racquets so close to the Open. He acknowledged it was his old Head frame and said something like, "It's a big tournament - of course I'm not going to switch right before the US Open." Later, he did play with the Kneissl Toms Reach Machine, which was not the same as the racquet in the picture above; the one pictured above is a later Kneissl Toms Machine that he used on the senior tour in 2006 and 2007. (This is the same racquet as TW sells, albeit with a more sedate paint job; this black and white one was never sold in the States. I have two I ordered from Austria.) I believe he's since gone back to Head.

Rabbit
09-03-2008, 12:47 PM
Yeah, I saw him last year in Houston playing with a Head and I believe I've seen pictures of him playing with a Head this year.

Pro_Tour_630
09-03-2008, 01:40 PM
this is the one adidasman is talking about, it is the same as the first photo of the thread only it is 28.

http://cache.viewimages.com/xc/1920038.jpg?v=1&c=ViewImages&k=2&d=17A4AD9FDB9CF19390335F8FA9CA92A60CD30D62BE4BACF9 9930FDCFC4C15FBB

the first generation was boxed beam at throat with 21 cross it is a dead giveaway, it is the closest to a PT630, i am sure he did use the first generation probably not in a match though will search for more photos. One question that pops up. If he did and was seen using the 2nd and third generation's which are very different from his PT630 I do not see why would he not have used the first generation which is the closest to his PT630:confused: seems strange

Pro_Tour_630
09-03-2008, 01:44 PM
can not tell if this is boxed beam with 21 cross, the search continues

http://cache.viewimages.com/xc/222440.jpg?v=1&c=ViewImages&k=2&d=17A4AD9FDB9CF1934A2752006EF5F0ED0FA522C2BD42DCAF 284831B75F48EF45

adidasman
09-04-2008, 11:44 AM
"the first generation was boxed beam at throat with 21 cross it is a dead giveaway, it is the closest to a PT630, i am sure he did use the first generation probably not in a match though will search for more photos. One question that pops up. If he did and was seen using the 2nd and third generation's which are very different from his PT630 I do not see why would he not have used the first generation which is the closest to his PT630 seems strange" I always suspected that the first generation Toms Machine was just a way to get Kneissl back into the tennis business, and that Muster saw no need to switch from his old Head to something that was essentially the same. He then switched to the Reach Machine, which was a full inch longer and really heavy (I can attest to that personally, as I used them for years) and, as you said, very different from his Head. But, right at the end of his career, when his contract with Kneissl expired in around 2000, he went back and used a blacked out Head frame (likely the PT 280) with no stencil or graphics of any kind. At least that's what I saw him using at Indian Wells around that time.

Pro_Tour_630
09-04-2008, 03:15 PM
well I would not call it essentially the same, just a frame that is closest to what he is familiar with.

I still do not understand why would he not play with something that is closer to his PT630, if he went on to go with a 28 inch bazooka only to go back to a PT630.

I would think he wanted more pop (power) so he went with the 28 inch and judging from his performance which was a disaster he went back to his trusty PT630/280

jelichek
09-04-2008, 06:18 PM
If you remember when Muster went to the longer racquet, which was in '97, he went to the semis of Australia, won in Key Biscayne, and took out Chang in the semis of Cincinnati and generally had a big hard court year although he lost to Henman at the Open that year in the first round. That is the match when he chased Henman half way around the court. He also had a relatively poor clay campaign that year and I remember, being the big Muster fan that I am, reading an article where he commented that the extra length of the racquet helped him gain extra pop on the hard top but took away from his clay court game and limited certain shots such as angles and the like.

Pro_Tour_630
09-05-2008, 05:37 AM
good info jelicek, so what have you settled on these days>?

jelichek
09-05-2008, 10:35 AM
Bought out a guy beating around the tour. He had eight PT57 A's stretched out to 27.5 with the Flexpoint Prestige cosmetic. Weight is 11.4 unstrung. As good as any of these things that I've had. And of course, it's Oktoberfest season. Great Lakes Brewing Co. up in Cleveland makes a pretty tasty one!

Pro_Tour_630
09-06-2008, 04:17 PM
do you think muster was playing with PT57A at 27.5 ,if not at least he should have.


I stopped drinking:cry:

with that said.........I might have to sneak out to Cleavland :shock:

tkramer15
09-06-2008, 06:11 PM
Interesting topic. I've been a huge Muster fan ever since I started following tennis in 1995. It was odd in 1997 when he switched to the extra long Reach Machine and did really well on hard courts, but struggled mightily on clay. I don't doubt that the racket had something to do with it, but I always felt that Muster really had something to prove after Agassi and Sampras criticized him in 1996 for attaining the number one ranking solely due to his clay court results. He came out with a vengeance, steamrolling to the semis in Australia with impressive wins over Courier and Ivanisevic before falling to Sampras. He really outplayed Pete in the second set of that match and should've won the set. Sampras hit a shot that was long on set point down, but it was missed. Too bad challenges didn't exist. Then he won Dubai, beating Courier and Ivanisevic again...reached the semis of Indian Wells and won Key Biscayne. I remember thinking that he would be almost assured of reaching number one again if he did anything like usual on clay, but then he struggled to win back-to-back matches over the next three months. Part of it may have been the racket, but unlike previous years when Muster typically didn't do well in the early hard or indoor events, he had already played so much that I think it took something out of him for the clay season. Out of nowhere, he got things going at Cincinnati and won four straight three setters to reach the final where he lost to Sampras again. I really thought he could do some damage at the US Open, where he'd reached the quarters three times, but he was doomed with a terrible first round draw of Henman, who was ranked about 20th and just missed getting seeded. He did okay in the fall indoor events, reaching a semifinal in Ostrava and the quarters in Paris, where he took a set off of Sampras. It looked like he really tried to peak for the clay court season again in 1998, and he did pretty well in a few of the warm-up events before reaching the quarters in Paris. The rest of that year, though, didn't go that well. Muster began 1999 with some solid wins to reach the semis in Sydney, but he won just two matches in ten other events. It was tough following his results knowing that the end was near, but it was strange when his name suddenly stopped appearing in draws for tournaments. Rather than make an announcement or play a fairwell tour, Muster simply disappeared midway through the year. I got to see him play in 1997 and 1998 in Cincinnati, but wished I had taken more time to have caught more of his matches. He was an incredible player -- one of the toughest competitors to ever play the game.

ilian
09-07-2008, 01:56 PM
Which Kneissl racket is this? (Or is it a PT630 pj)

http://img153.imageshack.us/img153/6141/thomas20musterbf3.jpg (http://imageshack.us)

According to me, that is a PT 630 pj.

jelichek
09-07-2008, 02:11 PM
When he, Muster, first switched to the Kneissl line, he was indeed using a Head Pro Tour with the Kneissl cosmetic. That is the racquet in the pic I believe.

jelichek
09-07-2008, 02:12 PM
And why exactly would anyone stop? One of my biggest decisions on a day to day basis is what time to start!

Pro_Tour_630
09-07-2008, 03:34 PM
Murray just waisted Nadal with Melzer Microgel Prestige Pro, it seems it worked out for Murray and not for melzer.

adidasman
09-10-2008, 12:36 PM
I seem to recall a brief time right at the end of his Kneissl deal where Tommy played with the Reach Machine on hard courts and the shorter Toms Machine (or the PT pj) on clay. But I always felt the biggest problem with his game on clay with the Reach Machine was, as jelichek said, he was worn out from winning on heard courts so much. I got to see him play a number of times - against Bruguera on the grandstand at the US Open in '94 and at Indian Wells against Pioline in maybe 1998 were two of the best, most entertaining matches I've ever seen. He was vastly underappreciated here in the States, but he was amazing.

bet
09-21-2008, 02:56 PM
If you remember when Muster went to the longer racquet, which was in '97, he went to the semis of Australia, won in Key Biscayne, and took out Chang in the semis of Cincinnati and generally had a big hard court year although he lost to Henman at the Open that year in the first round. That is the match when he chased Henman half way around the court. He also had a relatively poor clay campaign that year and I remember, being the big Muster fan that I am, reading an article where he commented that the extra length of the racquet helped him gain extra pop on the hard top but took away from his clay court game and limited certain shots such as angles and the like.

Precisely. That is indeed what Muster said. (though I think he also went off...or at least lessened...his doping at that time which may have been a bigger factor in his clay-court decline.

Muster was caught up in a buzz that was happening at the time of experimenting with longer racquets, largely due to Chang. The pros thought they to could benefit from them. Oddly, I think this was a false correlation. Chang's performances at the time were due to his hard work and the pros and cons of the longer racuquet were probably a wash(AT BEST) .

jelichek
09-23-2008, 06:12 PM
I had several opportunities to watch Muster play in person in Cincinnati and Key Biscayne and saw two of his matches in Florida in '97 when he won the title there but my favorite "live" Muster moment, and this is not the most politically correct post but... anyway we were down in Cinci at the ATP as it used to be called back then and Muster was practicing on the Center Court with Alex Corretja. who at that time was kinda a nemesis of his as far as Corretja was one of the five losses on the dirt Tom has over the course of those two years ('95-'96), and this was early in the morning before most of the crowd had arrived and Muster shanks a forehand and in his best, deep, Austrian baritone he yells out "f*gg*t" for all to hear and which resonated thru the whole place and pretty much summed up that macho, studly, persona he was at that time.