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View Full Version : DO NOT REFILL-plastic water bottles.


tbini87
09-11-2008, 11:47 AM
recently i have heard talk about not re-using water bottles made of the thin plastic (like arrowhead, crystal geyser, kirkland, etc). i noticed it says on the bottle to not refill. i am just curious why it is not recommended to refill. i have been refilling them for a while with water from a brita, but might stop now. any info you guys have on the issue? thanks for sharing.

Fedace
09-11-2008, 11:53 AM
the plastic will leach out and could cause Cancer. LOL.,...... anyhow, it is probably some kind of contractual thing.

FloridaAG
09-11-2008, 11:56 AM
Because they want you to buy more water, silly -

AAAA
09-11-2008, 12:05 PM
To the OP, I heard something about that. Not interested enough to find a more reputable source so this is it
http://environment.about.com/od/healthenvironment/a/plastic_bottles.htm

albino smurf
09-11-2008, 12:15 PM
They get funky.

Gemini
09-11-2008, 12:49 PM
If it says do not refill, then that particular bottle is made of a plastic that will over time begin to leak toxins into the water it holds. It doesn't really explain why it doesn't leak toxins into the bottle when it's sitting on a shelf somewhere before it's ever opened the first time though.

superstition
09-11-2008, 01:01 PM
It doesn't really explain why it doesn't leak toxins into the bottle when it's sitting on a shelf somewhere before it's ever opened the first time though.
They do, especially if allowed to get warm. If you buy distilled water and drink it like I do, you will taste and smell plastic/chemicals in some batches. I have had to switch from brand to brand (sometimes back again) due to the problem. Right now, I like Talawanda but it used to be really bad.

littleboi21
09-11-2008, 01:13 PM
The plastic have toxins as far as I know. At the bottom of a water bottle is a triangle with a number on it. Higher the number, the more dangerous the bottle is for reuse.

Also, it is not advisable to keep a water bottle directly into the heat of the sun. Or when its around a very hot environment.

Feel free to correct me here.

El Diablo
09-11-2008, 01:32 PM
Manufacturers put "do not refill" warnings on because people sometimes refill without completely washing and drying first, and this can lead to proliferation of bacteria, even in water. There have been deaths from bacterial poisoning in diners that continually refill the ketchup bottles without emptying and washing first, causing tremendous accumulation of dangerous bacteria, so it's become a standard warning in the food industry.

goober
09-11-2008, 01:38 PM
The plastic have toxins as far as I know. At the bottom of a water bottle is a triangle with a number on it. Higher the number, the more dangerous the bottle is for reuse.

Also, it is not advisable to keep a water bottle directly into the heat of the sun. Or when its around a very hot environment.

Feel free to correct me here.

I have read multiple conflicting bits of info on this topic.

From WebMD

To be certain that you are choosing a bottle that does not leach, check the recycling symbol on your bottle. If it is a #2 HDPE (high density polyethylene), or a #4 LDPE (low density polyethylene), or a #5 PP (polypropylene), your bottle is fine. The type of plastic bottle in which water is usually sold is usually a #1, and is only recommended for one time use. Do not refill it. Better to use a reusable water bottle, and fill it with your own filtered water from home and keep these single-use bottles out of the landfill.

Unfortunately, those fabulous colourful hard plastic lexan bottles made with polycarbonate plastics and identified by the #7 recycling symbol, may leach BPA.

SystemicAnomaly
09-11-2008, 01:48 PM
Most types of plastics used for water bottles do not pose a health risk. I posted quite a few details about this some time ago in another thread. I think that it is #7 and possibly #3 that may pose health problems when used for water or other drinks.

It's the bacteria buildup in all plastic bottles when reused that poses the real danger.

tbini87
09-11-2008, 02:03 PM
thanks for all the answers guys. i will have to look into it a little further, but thanks for the head start!

scotus
09-11-2008, 03:05 PM
Most types of plastics used for water bottles do not pose a health risk. I posted quite a few details about this some time ago in another thread. I think that it is #7 and possibly #3 that may pose health problems when used for water or other drinks.

It's the bacteria buildup in all plastic bottles when reused that poses the real danger.

I have a Lexan bottle that I use for tennis. It is #7 plastic.

When I heard the news a couple of years ago, I was under the impression that it was safe for cold water.

Let me know if that is not the case.

WildVolley
09-11-2008, 06:17 PM
The main problem with Lexan was said to be Bisphenol A leaching into the water. Now there are #7 bottles that claim to be BPA-free. A lot of studies claim that leaching into cold water that wasn't stored for days was almost non-existent, and mainly occurred with acidic or hot liquids, or when harsh cleaners were used on the Lexan first.

The worry about Bisphenol A is that studies showed adverse effects on animals at levels that were earlier claimed to be safe for humans.

I just purchased a Bisphenol A-free #7 bottle from Nalgene. Who knows if it leaches some other chemical? I just use it with room temperature drinking water and haven't noticed any change in odor or taste.

ZoomUltraflight
09-11-2008, 06:59 PM
We learned about something like this in environmental science. the plastic bottles you buy from a company like poland spring for example, were not designed for long term usage. Over long periods of time (as in years) they will start leaching chemicals from the plastic. If you use the same one for a week there will more than likely not be a problem. But if you use the same poland spring bottle for a year, there might be problems starting to develop

Fee
09-11-2008, 07:21 PM
I've read about a few problems with using and reusing bottled water.

1. Bottle water is bad for the environment in many ways - use of plastic, transportation of the product, etc - and people really should just use home bottled water in a good refillable bottle.

2. Re-using the flimsy bottles is bad because of the bacteria buildup and the leeching (both have already been mentioned). The problem is made worse by putting these bottles in the dishwasher because the heat and force of the water actually causes them to break down.

3. The purported problem with the hard plastic bottles is the leeching or chemicals, and now some people are switching to aluminum sport bottles. I use a rubbermaid bottle and I rinse it every night and let it air dry before refilling it the next day. I've decided to err on the side of caution and not leave water standing in it overnight. I also try to keep it out of direct sunlight and away from other temperatures extremes.

Hope that helps (along with the other info already posted here). Do an advanced search, in the section only, for the word 'water' in the title only (or the word 'bottle') and see if the previous thread turns up. :)

lethalfang
09-11-2008, 08:36 PM
If it says do not refill, then that particular bottle is made of a plastic that will over time begin to leak toxins into the water it holds. It doesn't really explain why it doesn't leak toxins into the bottle when it's sitting on a shelf somewhere before it's ever opened the first time though.

It generally doesn't leak toxins if it remains cold and contains only water.
If you keep reusing those bottles, however, bacteria will grow.
The only way to get rid of bacteria is to wash them and preferably with hot water, which will leak the toxins into water.
Reuse it a couple of time is okay, but don't keep using the same disposable bottle for weeks.

north4t
09-11-2008, 09:06 PM
does any body know if the 32 oz.Gatorade bottles or the hard plastic nalgene bottles are ok or not

Fee
09-11-2008, 10:14 PM
I would not reuse a Gatorade bottle more than 48 hours after I first opened it. Nalgene, depends who you talk to, but I personally try to stay away from them.

I think the information can be interpreted either way, so really it comes down to your personal choice.

superman1
09-11-2008, 11:02 PM
Nalgene came out with some new bottles but I would just steer clear of them completely, they didn't know what the hell they were doing in the first place so why trust them now?

I bought an Aquasana water bottle that has a built-in filter in it. You just have to change the filter every 3 months. You get pure water wherever you go, and any carcinogens from the plastic are filtered out as well.

babolat41
09-12-2008, 12:09 AM
I can't beleave this thread!!! Go buy a case of water, drink it, recycle it.........

SystemicAnomaly
09-12-2008, 01:39 AM
The plastic have toxins as far as I know. At the bottom of a water bottle is a triangle with a number on it. Higher the number, the more dangerous the bottle is for reuse...

Feel free to correct me here.

I am pretty sure that the release of toxins (due to Bisphenol A) is really only a problem with some type #3 and #7 plastics.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bisphenol_A#Identification_in_plastics (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bisphenol_A#Identification_in_plastics)



does any body know if the 32 oz.Gatorade bottles or the hard plastic nalgene bottles are ok or not

What is the plastic recycling ID code on the 32 oz Gatorade bottles? I checked out the ID on a 20 oz bottle that I have and discovered it is Type #1 which is not considered a toxin threat. It potentially still has the bacteria problem if reused tho'.

Do the Nalgene bottles have a recycling ID code? As I understand it, the older Nalgene products did pose a toxin threat from BP-A. However, the newer Nalgene bottles are supposed to be BPA-free

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nalgene#Possible_Health_Risks_and_Company_Efforts_ to_Resolve (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nalgene#Possible_Health_Risks_and_Company_Efforts_ to_Resolve)
.

SystemicAnomaly
09-12-2008, 01:49 AM
I can't beleave this thread!!! Go buy a case of water, drink it, recycle it.........

Come to think of it, buying bottled water is something of a waste of resources and not particularly good for the environment to make all that plastic in the first place. Probably best to buy larger bottles rather than several smaller ones -- more efficient use of plastic & less impact on the environment.


I have a Lexan bottle that I use for tennis. It is #7 plastic.

When I heard the news a couple of years ago, I was under the impression that it was safe for cold water...

I believe that WildVolley is right about this. Type #7 is something of a catch-all recyling ID for plastics that do not fit in the other 6 categories. Some type #7 plastics, such as polycarbonate plastics, can leach toxins = BPA.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plastic_recycling#Plastic_Identification_Code (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plastic_recycling#Plastic_Identification_Code)
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Resin_identification_code#Table_of_resin_codes (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Resin_identification_code#Table_of_resin_codes)

.

topsltennis
09-12-2008, 06:55 AM
Hmmm. What immediately comes to mind for me are the large igloo coolers at clubs that sit out in the sun all the time. Or my plastic insulated jug that I keep in the car and then put water in every afternoon before heading to the courts. Am I at risk?

volusiano
09-12-2008, 07:51 AM
Most types of plastics used for water bottles do not pose a health risk. I posted quite a few details about this some time ago in another thread. I think that it is #7 and possibly #3 that may pose health problems when used for water or other drinks.

It's the bacteria buildup in all plastic bottles when reused that poses the real danger.

Can you elaborate on the bacteria build up? If you wash and rinse the bottle well and let it dry out first, wouldn't this kill out the bacteria? Just like washing dishes, no?

SystemicAnomaly
09-12-2008, 01:56 PM
Can you elaborate on the bacteria build up? If you wash and rinse the bottle well and let it dry out first, wouldn't this kill out the bacteria? Just like washing dishes, no?

The bacteria probably comes from backwash from your own mouth as well as from the air. Many people will just refill the bottle w/o bothering to wash it, allowing the bacteria to multiply.

Since a lot of bacteria thrives in warm, moist environments, I would take the cleansing process a step further. After washing/rinsing the bottle in hot/warm water, I will perform a final rinse with cold water, shake off the excess water and then immediately throw the bottle into the freezer.

However, I would not do this for any bottle that might contain BP-A.

superman1
09-12-2008, 09:14 PM
I can't beleave this thread!!! Go buy a case of water, drink it, recycle it.........

Anyone who buys bottled water is a stooge. If you're talking about one of those big plastic jugs of water, that's okay, but you might as well just buy a water filtration system.

Hot Sauce
09-12-2008, 10:48 PM
Anyone who buys bottled water is a stooge. If you're talking about one of those big plastic jugs of water, that's okay, but you might as well just buy a water filtration system.

Bottled water is the sh*t. It's so convenient.

origmarm
09-13-2008, 05:04 AM
Depending on the type of bottle there is some leaching effect. This was discussed here:
http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=192668&highlight=bottle
to some degree.

As to why you shouldn't refill normal water bottles there are 2 reasons. The first as mentioned already in this thread is bacteria buildup. The second is that the platstic compound used in "one use" type bottles is more vulnerable to solar degredation and heat and also to stress degredation i.e. damaged by cracking etc. The worst thing you can do is freeze it essentially

Hot Sauce
09-13-2008, 11:26 AM
I just got a free plastic bottle from my school. It has the 7 on the bottom, damn. It actually is labeled not to put hot water in it, though.

WildVolley
09-14-2008, 06:56 AM
I just got a free plastic bottle from my school. It has the 7 on the bottom, damn. It actually is labeled not to put hot water in it, though.

As SystemicAnomaly noted above, #7 is a miscellaneous plastic recycle code. It might or might not be made with BPA. Definitely don't put hot water into it, or anything acidic, and only wash it with dish washing liquid or other mild soap.

tbini87
09-17-2008, 06:14 PM
my wife recently bought us matching nalgene bottles that read BPA Free right on the bottle. i guess i am now safe... haha.

SystemicAnomaly
09-18-2008, 02:13 AM
Further caveats: minimizing your consumption of canned food and canned beverages, as BPA may be used to line the cans; choose fresh or frozen food and bottled juices instead.
This came from the following article:

How to Avoid Bisphenol-A (http://www.thedailygreen.com/living-green/blogs/green-products-services/avoid-bisphenol-a-55091701?src=syn&dom=yah_buzz&mag=tdg&ha=1&kw=ist)


Other related articles:

3 Suspect Plastics to Avoid... (http://www.thedailygreen.com/green-homes/eco-friendly/plastic-bottles-toxins-water-bottles-460410)

How To Limit Your BPA Exposure (http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/04/15/AR2008041502161.html)
.

Mystere
09-18-2008, 08:11 AM
when I am biking I use a number 5.

superstition
09-22-2008, 10:57 PM
I found this on a blog. It may or may not be accurate:

Avoiding BPA, Phthalates and Styrenes are not protecting you from estrogenic activity (EA)

Unfortunately, avoiding three scary chemicals (BPA, phthalates, styrenes) in plastics doesn’t solve the problem you are discussing in your article. Our data show that the great majority of all plastics in all the recycle categories release chemicals that often have the same or more estrogenic activity (EA), as do the three scary chemicals now receiving much press and legislative attention.

Consumers have well-justified concerns about the EA exhibited by BPA, phthalates and styrenes in currently available plastic products. While estrogens (the female sex hormones) occur naturally in the body, many scientific studies have shown that significant health problems can occur when chemicals are ingested that mimic or block the actions of these female sex hormones; the fetus, newborn, or young child is especially vulnerable. These health-related problems include early puberty in females, reduced sperm counts in males, altered functions of reproductive organs, obesity, altered behaviors, and increased rates of some breast, ovarian, testicular, and prostate cancers.

Unfortunately, BPA, phthalates and styrenes are just three of several thousand chemicals that exhibit EA. These chemicals having EA leach from almost all plastics sold today, including polyethylene, polypropylene, PET, etc. That is, plastics advertised as BPA-free or phthalate-free are not EA-free; almost all these plastics still leach chemicals having EA – and often have more total EA than the original. In fact, our data show that all the plastics release chemicals having EA.

Current legislation is attempting to solve this problem by removing chemicals having EA (BPA, phthalates) one at a time. This approach is not an appropriate solution because hundreds of chemicals used in plastics exhibit EA, not just BPA and phthalates. This is a marketing-driven solution, not a health-driven solution. The appropriate health-driven solution is to manufacture safer plastics that are completely EA-free. This is not a pie-in-the-sky solution, as the technology already exists to produce EA-free plastics that also have the same advantageous physical properties, as do almost all existing EA-releasing plastics on the market today. In fact, some of these advanced-technology EA-free plastics are already in the marketplace.

George D. Bittner, PhD Professor of Biology, The University of Texas at Austin Founder: CertiChem, PlastiPure

Thud and blunder
09-23-2008, 06:28 AM
Use these (http://www.sigg.ch/) - look good too.

StumpyDaMooseGod
09-25-2008, 06:22 PM
So how about those hard reusable plastic bottles like the one TW sells? I'm wondering if it's safe to pour water in there and leave it in the fridge for the morning or pouring warm water in it for tea?

SystemicAnomaly
09-26-2008, 01:23 AM
Use these (http://www.sigg.ch/) - look good too.

Saw the SIGGs at Whole Foods yesterday -- looks good, but not cheap. Will have to check REI to see if they are any cheaper there.