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View Full Version : rok vs. pog mid


dander
03-29-2004, 01:21 PM
any thoughts on the comparison and contrast of these two small players frames? anybody hit both?

jayserinos99
03-30-2004, 12:22 AM
i had both at one point. with my game (western forehand, two-handed backhand) i liked the pog mid better. i couldn't get into any rhythm with the big spin i'm used to hitting with the rok. both racquets are great at the net but it was the spin potential that made me sell my roks.

Benjamin
03-30-2004, 04:48 AM
Here is a post I put up a week or two ago.

I had a chance to warm up and play three sets yesterday with the Wilson ROK. Below you will find my impressions of playing with this racquet.

Serves: Although this racquet received a 77 on serves/overheads from TW, I wasn’t expecting much from it because they gave it a 52 as far as power is concerned. I’ve never had a big serve so I was expecting VERY little pace from it. It is not a racquet that will give you a booming serve but I served extremely well with it. Compared to my POG mid, the power was less but the control more than made up for the decrease in power. I had several service winners as well as 3 aces (2 out wide and one down the middle) because of the decent power and amazing control (I typically average about 3 aces per year). It almost felt like I could think exactly where I wanted the ball to go and it automatically went there. Kick serves didn’t have the kick that I normally get with my POG mid but they had more than I would have thought with such a small head and dense string pattern. As far as compared with the POG mid I would say they are about equal. If I could get my first serve in as consistently as I did yesterday with the ROK, I would say I serve better with the ROK….but if my first serve wasn’t going in (as is typical with my serve) then I would have to give the edge to the POG mid because of the extra kick I get on second serves.

Groundstrokes: Topspin is very hard to apply. I had to make a quick decision as to whether I was going to use slice or topspin so that if I was going to use top I had to tell myself to swing huge with extreme topspin. Topspin is the area that might give me a problem playing with this racquet day after day. My game relies pretty heavily on topspin so I would have to adjust my game to hit more flat balls, unless stringing it with Luxilon BBALU Power 16L would add quite a bit more spin that the Wilson Synthetic Gut 16g strings did that were in the demo. As far as slice goes, I would give a big edge to the ROK. Almost every slice I hit stayed very low on the fly (clearing the net by a couple inches) and after it hit the court it stayed even lower than what I get from my POG. I switched back to my POG for comparison and I usually hit the tape or hit it out when going for the same shot that was skimming the tape and landing within 2 feet of the baseline with the ROK. There is a noticeable drop off in power when going from the POG mid to the ROK. I was still able to hit just as many winners with the ROK because of the amazing control but they weren’t because I just ripped the cover off the ball. At times I had problems with hitting the ball in the net off backhand returns because I would go for the same net clearance as I do for my POG mid and the ball would just land shorter. I had to make sure I adjusted and tried to clear the net by a little extra height. I loved the way I could “hold” a shot for just an extra second before I went crosscourt or down the line. It seemed like I had my opponent wrong footed more yesterday than any other day in recent memory. I would give a very slight edge in ground strokes to the POG…..but if dropping the tension a pound or two and going to the Luxilon string would add more topspin, then I would say that they are pretty equal.

Volleys: This racquet could change me from someone who only comes to net to shake hands to a chip and charge specialist….it IS that good at net. I’ve been getting some advice from guys over in the “Tips” section of this board about how to incorporate a volleying part to my game. I tried their tips yesterday with the ROK and I was amazed. I cannot wait to get out on the court again and start chipping and charging some more. On every second service return and every short ball I would slice the ball down the line and come in. With this racquet in my hands, I actually felt like I belonged there. I could volley with decent pace and depth, put an overhead away easily, or take the pace off and just drop the ball over the net with some of the most amazing angles I’ve ever hit. It’s just a fabulous racquet for chip and charging: that slice staying so low gives your opponent troubles and then the maneuverability and touch of this racquet makes putting the ball away a breeze (even for someone like me who has netaphobia). The ROK has such a solid feel, great maneuverability, superb flex, put away power, and amazing touch at net. As for comparison, I switched back to my POG for a couple games….it’s maneuverability at net is even worse than I thought (when comparing it to the ROK), sweetspot felt smaller, and just didn’t have the right flex or power level to drop the ball just barely on the other side of the net. HUGE edge to the ROK at the net!!! This aspect of the ROK alone could almost make me try it on a more permanent basis. I’ve always wanted to add a volleying aspect to my game but could never find a racquet that made me feel like I belonged up there…until now.

Well, that’s about it. In conclusion I’d say that if I could find a way to add a little more topspin to this racquet I would probably be VERY tempted to purchase one of these. The reasons would be because {compared to my POG mid} it gives better control on serves and groundstrokes (yes, it is hard for me to believe too}, makes it easier to “whip” on the run forehands crosscourt, and the main reason would be because it could actually make me into a true “all court” player….allowing me to add another dimension to my game by actually giving me huge confidence coming to the net.

Benjamin