PDA

View Full Version : Once you break a string, are you suppose to remove it?


PrinceAbubu
09-20-2008, 04:48 AM
I heard leaving broken strings on the frame deforms frames whilst its in there due to uneven pull on unbroken side.

Is it true? If so, what happens if you dont have a scissors with you when you break a string? sounds funny, but tennis racquets arent cheap these days.

iHabNoTeef
09-20-2008, 04:52 AM
That is true, broken strings can deform a frame. If it is only one string that is broken it would take a long time to deform a frame but you should cut the strings out as soon as possible.

Zhou
09-20-2008, 05:49 AM
I heard leaving broken strings on the frame deforms frames whilst its in there due to uneven pull on unbroken side.

Is it true? If so, what happens if you dont have a scissors with you when you break a string? sounds funny, but tennis racquets arent cheap these days.

It is recommended to remove the strings. Do not pull out the strings by hand. It is better to leave them in until you can cut them out using a pair of scissors or snips.

tennisfreak15347
09-20-2008, 06:49 AM
It is recommended to remove the strings. Do not pull out the strings by hand. It is better to leave them in until you can cut them out using a pair of scissors or snips.

why shouldn't you remove them by hand? I do that sometimes, and sometimes I cut them in a spiral pattern.

bladepdb
09-20-2008, 06:58 AM
I am guessing Zhou meant don't pull them out before cutting most of your stringbed, otherwise you'll find yourself forcing the string out of the racquet from only on or two spots (one string broken) versus several cut strings.

As far as cutting them goes, as long as you keep the distribution relatively even (i.e. one main, one cross, relatively close to the center), you're playing it more than safe. Though I don't know exactly what you mean by spiral....

tennisfreak15347
09-20-2008, 07:09 AM
I am guessing Zhou meant don't pull them out before cutting most of your stringbed, otherwise you'll find yourself forcing the string out of the racquet from only on or two spots (one string broken) versus several cut strings.

As far as cutting them goes, as long as you keep the distribution relatively even (i.e. one main, one cross, relatively close to the center), you're playing it more than safe. Though I don't know exactly what you mean by spiral....

spiral pattern cutting as in you cut one cross, then one main, then one cross, then one main, ect

Zhou
09-20-2008, 07:16 AM
why shouldn't you remove them by hand? I do that sometimes, and sometimes I cut them in a spiral pattern.

What I mean by pulling them out by hand is when you follow the broken main or cross undoing those and just taking the string out in 1 long piece. It places an enormous amount of pressure on the racquet.

tennisfreak15347
09-20-2008, 07:25 AM
What I mean by pulling them out by hand is when you follow the broken main or cross undoing those and just taking the string out in 1 long piece. It places an enormous amount of pressure on the racquet.

well, then i have another question. I had all my mains done, but I tied-off, forgetting to tension the string, so the entire last main was loose, but I didn't tie off the other last-main yet, so I just un-winded the mains. however, it didn't break; is there any damage to my frame, or should I just never do it again?

Zhou
09-20-2008, 07:35 AM
I would say tie off and just finish the racquet. It is the last main and shouldn't do too much because you mainly hit on the middle 10 mains. I would not suggest attempting to untie the knot because it already had a lot of stress put on it through the knot tying process. Just my opinion.

Also I would not do that ever again because it does put an unnecessary amount of stress on your racquet. I would say you might have lucked out saying you used 20 ft for the mains and 20 for the crosses thus giving you just enough to tie off on the mains.

b0oMeR
09-20-2008, 08:25 AM
I would say tie off and just finish the racquet. It is the last main and shouldn't do too much because you mainly hit on the middle 10 mains. I would not suggest attempting to untie the knot because it already had a lot of stress put on it through the knot tying process. Just my opinion.

Also I would not do that ever again because it does put an unnecessary amount of stress on your racquet. I would say you might have lucked out saying you used 20 ft for the mains and 20 for the crosses thus giving you just enough to tie off on the mains.


thanks for telling me that....
Thats what i usually do, lol.
well time to carry scissors around.

fuzz nation
09-21-2008, 06:27 AM
I'm enough of a nerd that I keep little wire cutters in my bag for such occasions. If I pop a string, I cut the crosses out before I cut the mains since a racquet hoop is typically weaker in that direction (sort of like an egg). I just snip every other cross, alternating from the middle out to the top and bottom of the string bed, then do the same with every other main from the middle out to the edges. Going every other string is enough to relieve tension and after I've done every other cross and main, I can drop that frame in my bag for later if I'm in the middle of playing - my priority is to get rid of the uneven tension on the hoop once a string goes.

2nd_Serve
09-21-2008, 03:58 PM
Try to remove it as soon as possible.

tennisfreak15347
09-21-2008, 05:17 PM
would it be very bad to keep hitting with the racquet after the strings break?

Richie Rich
09-21-2008, 05:21 PM
would it be very bad to keep hitting with the racquet after the strings break?

could be but after 2 or 3 hits all the tension is pretty much gone anyway. but i wouldn't advise it :lol: