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davidahenry
09-22-2008, 06:40 PM
I was in a tennis specialty shop in my town yesterday, and the owner was the only one working. He was in the back stringing while I was browsing around the shop. He was just starting the crosses on a racquet when another customer came in needing help with selecting a racquet. So what is a shop owner to do? Ignore the customer? Or leave the racquet half done and help the customer? Well... He left the racquet and was with the customer for at least 20 minutes - until I left the store. Who knows how long that poor racquet was sitting there with tension only on the mains?

Then later in the day, my son and I were checking out a tennis club to join. We walked in and saw one of the pros stringing a racquet. He politely offered to take us on a tour of the club and didn't think twice about leaving the partially strung racquet on the machine. I appeciated the tour but felt bad for the customer whose racquet was left on the machine. I tried not to ask many questions and end the tour quickly, so he could get back to stringing. :)

To me, these two situations are poor examples of "professional" racquet stringing. I understand that in both situations, the guys needed to tend to customers on the spot, but it still seems like bad stringing practices.

Am I making too big of deal about this? Can frames be damaged if left for 15 - 20 minutes?

Thanks.

zapvor
09-22-2008, 06:43 PM
i dont think its a good idea. i try not to leave the racket for over 5 minutes unless necessary

babolat15
09-22-2008, 06:51 PM
hahahaha, sorry to burst you bubble but i leave my rackets on there overnight sometimes, although i did crack a k6.1 last week

tennisfreak15347
09-22-2008, 06:56 PM
i dont think 20 minutes will do too much harm, as I string my mains in 15 minutes, and it takes my crosses 45-50 minutes to string, so I'd assume it's just as bad :).

TheRed
09-22-2008, 07:49 PM
20 minutes is not gonna kill a racquet. a couple of hours is not a good idea, overnight is bad but I'd say anything under an hour won't make a difference

b0oMeR
09-22-2008, 08:06 PM
They operate a business, they have no choice even if they have to service you for 2/3 hours they will service you for the 2/3 hours.

It isnt a great thing to leave your racquet on there for more than an hour or so even if there is not visible damage there probably still is damage. However many people who string multiple times a week is just as bad or even worst in terms of strain to the racquet.

Racquets are believe it or not, a cheaper part of tennis. The money is in the strings.

aussie
09-22-2008, 09:04 PM
I was great friends with a pro stringer for many, many years. Many was the time that he would leave racquets half strung overnight. Never ever caused a problem, period. Would I do that? Never. But he did, and he strung for many pros, including Jimmy Connors when he played in Australia.

goldenyama
09-23-2008, 05:49 AM
hahahaha, sorry to burst you bubble but i leave my rackets on there overnight sometimes, although i did crack a k6.1 last week

Ummmmm yeah thats really bursting his bubble by proving his point with your cracked k6.1...

bsandy
09-23-2008, 06:54 AM
What's the difference between someone who takes 45 minutes to string a racquet, and someone who take 25 minutes to string a racquet + a 20 minute break, in the middle.

Some stringers are too anal !

. . . Bud

YULitle
09-23-2008, 07:00 AM
20 minutes isn't going to hurt it so bad. This is a dilemma for most every stringer/shop-owner. You have to take care of the customer.

For me, I tried to make the conversation centered around the machine (so I could keep stringing) if at all possible. But, I wouldn't hesitate to take a customer to where they needed to be and take care of them. You just have to keep the racquet in the back of your mind so that you don't forget it.


Oh, and friends don't let friends leave racquets half-strung overnight.

Hyd
09-23-2008, 07:05 AM
You're making too big a deal out of this in my opinion. I'm the stringer for the club I play at and I usually go string before playing tennis and sometimes I don't have the time to finish the racquet before I play so I just leave it there for about 2 hours and finish it after and I've never had any problem. Racquets aren't as fragile as people think they are, not anymore anyway.

dallastxtennis
09-23-2008, 07:15 AM
You're making too big a deal out of this in my opinion. I'm the stringer for the club I play at and I usually go string before playing tennis and sometimes I don't have the time to finish the racquet before I play so I just leave it there for about 2 hours and finish it after and I've never had any problem. Racquets aren't as fragile as people think they are, not anymore anyway.

Amen to that, I wonder where is the rule do not leave your racket half strung came from ?

davidahenry
09-23-2008, 07:40 AM
Thanks for all the comments Gang. Sounds like it wasn't so bad after all. Good to know.

Take care.

Valjean
09-23-2008, 08:01 AM
I am left curious how, feeling as you did then, you let the club pro leave his racquet work rather than wait for him to finish it?

Cup8489
09-23-2008, 08:06 AM
Amen to that, I wonder where is the rule do not leave your racket half strung came from ?

it came from people having their racquets shatter from the stresses of leaving it unstrung for a couple of hours. my assitant coach in high school shattered his PS 85 (at the time brand spankin new) while stringing it at 53 lbs with a multi, he left for a half hour, came back and saw it cracked and nasty looking

and the ps 85 is a solid racquet. so do yourself a favor. don't leave it partially strung for too long.

McLovin
09-23-2008, 08:23 AM
I have been stringing rackets for over 15 years, and have never had a problem leaving a racket half-strung for 20 minutes or 20 hours. Chances are that the 'brand spanking new PS 85' had a defect and it was going to 'shatter' anyway...

If you can provide me with some empirical data that shows the frame breaks down during that time, and by how much, then I'll think twice about it, but until then, I'll put these wild ideas where they belong: Right next to the Global Warming/Global Cooling/Climate Change stats and the 'my racket caused tennis elbow' complaints...

bigmatt
09-23-2008, 08:50 AM
The racquet CAN be affected by being left half-strung: the head expands and contracts under tension, and stress points are set up. Maybe the results of yours were so slight you couldn't feel it, but it happens nonetheless.
The big deal is what can happen to string tension: once you finish pulling tension on a string, it begins to relax and "creep", losing tension. If you come back and pull the original reference tension on the remaining strings, they are going to be tighter than the rest, and it most likely will not equalize fully over time. You're going to have an inconsistent string face.

McLovin
09-23-2008, 09:00 AM
Maybe the results of yours were so slight you couldn't feel it, but it happens nonetheless.
With all due respect, you just stated something as 'fact' but have provided nothing to back it up. Show me your data, please.

equinox
09-23-2008, 09:39 AM
I have been stringing rackets for over 15 years, and have never had a problem leaving a racket half-strung for 20 minutes or 20 hours. Chances are that the 'brand spanking new PS 85' had a defect and it was going to 'shatter' anyway...



You're obviously not the kind to follow industry best practices.

SW Stringer
09-23-2008, 10:05 AM
A good thing you only string for yourself and not real customers.

You're obviously not the kind to follow industry best practices. Good luck with your double pulling, non alternating, non fanning, throat2head technique. I bet you don't even calibrate your machine or clean your clamps, what about inspecting the racquet before and after stringing. To much hassle for a pro like yourself.

Please smile on your next shanked smash when your plump short stick with broken nano fibers collapses in your hands.

McLovin said: "With all due respect, you just stated something as 'fact' but have provided nothing to back it up. Show me your data, please."

McLovin was respectful and polite in his request.

Equinox, you were anything but respectful and polite, ascribing to McLovin many of the stringing art practices that are counter to the industry standards. Of course many of those practices are the result of "old strintgers tales" and not backed up by the racquet manufacterers themselves, nor by the scientific experiments detailed in the "Physics and Technology of Tennis".

I'm with McLovin on this one. Show me your data, PLEASE! The condesension, insults, smoke and mirrors baloney doesn't cut it in the scientific realm. Thanks.

Valjean
09-23-2008, 11:28 AM
McLovin said: "With all due respect, you just stated something as 'fact' but have provided nothing to back it up. Show me your data, please."

McLovin was respectful and polite in his request.

Equinox, you were anything but respectful and polite, ascribing to McLovin many of the stringing art practices that are counter to the industry standards. Of course many of those practices are the result of "old strintgers tales" and not backed up by the racquet manufacterers themselves, nor by the scientific experiments detailed in the "Physics and Technology of Tennis".

I'm with McLovin on this one. Show me your data, PLEASE! The condesension, insults, smoke and mirrors baloney doesn't cut it in the scientific realm. Thanks.
Well, in addition to The Physics And Technology of Tennis, the USRSA publishes its Racquet Service Techniques every year, has produced a video on how to string, and offers a related DVD, Racquet Service. What's more, in its monthly publication, Racquet Sports Industry, it regularly discusses such issues. Many of the USRSA's recommendations are about and related to protecting the racquet while it is being strung. I wonder how selective McLovin wants us to be about the many things we are told, don't you too? I'd also think--since it goes against the grain of what professionals do and are told--that before he "verified" to us his own practice, he'd think and ask the USRSA what *it* says for the benefit of the rest of us. But then, it's merely the first and original source of most of those "old stringers' tales" you both apparently value so.

Cup8489
09-23-2008, 11:29 AM
I have been stringing rackets for over 15 years, and have never had a problem leaving a racket half-strung for 20 minutes or 20 hours. Chances are that the 'brand spanking new PS 85' had a defect and it was going to 'shatter' anyway...

If you can provide me with some empirical data that shows the frame breaks down during that time, and by how much, then I'll think twice about it, but until then, I'll put these wild ideas where they belong: Right next to the Global Warming/Global Cooling/Climate Change stats and the 'my racket caused tennis elbow' complaints...

i can't give you empirical data because inherently not all frames are created equal. hed used the frame once already, strung by a usrsa certified stringer (at a tournament he was in) and when he broke the strings, he was putting more back in himself, had never had any issues with frames before, and it cracked. cosmetically there was nothing wrong, and there was apparently no pinging noises to indicate the frame's structural integrity was compromised.

i can't give you what you're asking for, there's no way to PROVE that it does affect a frame to leave it half-strung. but since you need proof that it does affect the frame, you need to prove to me, other than word-of-mouth, that it doesnt.

i'm inclined and biased to believe it does, as personal experience and instruction from certified stringers have told me. but what of you? what do you have to back up that it doesnt? scientifically, the stresses MUST affect it to a degree, and the longer the frame is left unbalanced by being half-strung, the stresses negatively affect the contruction of the frame exponentially. it's physics, basic physics, that proves what i'm saying.

davidahenry
09-23-2008, 12:09 PM
I am left curious how, feeling as you did then, you let the club pro leave his racquet work rather than wait for him to finish it?

I didn't feel THAT bad about it. It wasn't my racquet. :) Only kidding, my friend.

It didn't dawn on me right away. The pro was friendly and offered a tour. My son and I took him up on it. As we walked back by the pro shop area during the tour, I realized the racquet was still on the machine, and I cut the tour short - as best I could.

Take care.

tennisfreak15347
09-23-2008, 12:11 PM
i can't give you empirical data because inherently not all frames are created equal. hed used the frame once already, strung by a usrsa certified stringer (at a tournament he was in) and when he broke the strings, he was putting more back in himself, had never had any issues with frames before, and it cracked. cosmetically there was nothing wrong, and there was apparently no pinging noises to indicate the frame's structural integrity was compromised.

i can't give you what you're asking for, there's no way to PROVE that it does affect a frame to leave it half-strung. but since you need proof that it does affect the frame, you need to prove to me, other than word-of-mouth, that it doesnt.

i'm inclined and biased to believe it does, as personal experience and instruction from certified stringers have told me. but what of you? what do you have to back up that it doesnt? scientifically, the stresses MUST affect it to a degree, and the longer the frame is left unbalanced by being half-strung, the stresses negatively affect the contruction of the frame exponentially. it's psychics, basic phsyics, that proves what i'm saying.
happily agreed.

tennisfreak15347
09-23-2008, 12:14 PM
I have been stringing rackets for over 15 years, and have never had a problem leaving a racket half-strung for 20 minutes or 20 hours. Chances are that the 'brand spanking new PS 85' had a defect and it was going to 'shatter' anyway...

If you can provide me with some empirical data that shows the frame breaks down during that time, and by how much, then I'll think twice about it, but until then, I'll put these wild ideas where they belong: Right next to the Global Warming/Global Cooling/Climate Change stats and the 'my racket caused tennis elbow' complaints...

Just to add in, there are too many wrong statements within your post, regarding global warming/gobal cooling. have you heard of the greenhouse effect? Since this thread is not about global warming, ect, I will relate back to the topic. Secondly, if you leave a racquet half-strung, stress would be put on to the top and bottom of the frame, but not the sides. obviously it would stress the racquet in an unnecessary way. two posts above me already explained this.

Zach
09-23-2008, 04:14 PM
As it's already been said, frames are probably not going to shatter on a machine if you leave it half strung on a machine for a few hours. However, the tension of the mains and crosses will be at different extremes.

[K]aotic
09-23-2008, 04:34 PM
ok guys the answer to this dilemna is not whether the frame will break, but to....drumroll please,









hire a second person.

McLovin
09-24-2008, 04:25 AM
i can't give you what you're asking for, there's no way to PROVE that it does affect a frame to leave it half-strung.
While I would like to thank you for agreeing with me, you are wrong here. There are ways of proving it. Its called testing a theory.

You start with a sample set of frames (3 or 4 of the same frames, maybe using a few different models). Take measurements (dimensions, flex, etc.), then string them all on the same machine as you normally would. Take the same measurements, in addition to a tension measurement and having someone hit with them and give their opinion.

Then, restring them all, but do one straight through, stop halfway on one and let it sit for an hour before finishing, and stop halfway on another and let sit for 24 hours before finishing. Take the measurements again and compare. Also, have the same person hit with all the frames and let them tell you if there is any difference.

If there is any measurable difference between frames, then you would have an argument. I would probably take the tension measurement after the hitting session as well to see if the strings settled or if the theory of an inconsistent string bed holds.

Cup8489
09-24-2008, 06:19 AM
While I would like to thank you for agreeing with me, you are wrong here. There are ways of proving it. Its called testing a theory.

You start with a sample set of frames (3 or 4 of the same frames, maybe using a few different models). Take measurements (dimensions, flex, etc.), then string them all on the same machine as you normally would. Take the same measurements, in addition to a tension measurement and having someone hit with them and give their opinion.

Then, restring them all, but do one straight through, stop halfway on one and let it sit for an hour before finishing, and stop halfway on another and let sit for 24 hours before finishing. Take the measurements again and compare. Also, have the same person hit with all the frames and let them tell you if there is any difference.

If there is any measurable difference between frames, then you would have an argument. I would probably take the tension measurement after the hitting session as well to see if the strings settled or if the theory of an inconsistent string bed holds.

or you could use common sense and realize that no material is unaffected by the stresses of tensioned string on it. the way the frame works, the tension pulls the hoop inward from all directions, minimizing the stress using the arch and frame structure. but by leaving just the mains pulled, it only has a force acting on the 12 o'clock and 6 o'clock positions and thus distorts the total force applied over a smaller area, resulting in more stress along the lines of the force, becasue the crosses are not installed, there is no acting force from 9 and 3, causing at the very least some frame deformation, if not frame breakage

by the way, why did you include the first step of stringing them all and playing with them?

and you certainly wouldnt use different models in the same experiment. maybe a set of experiments, one for each model, because otherwise your results would be skewed and be nonreflective of the overall product

but once again, you fail to prove that it won't affect the frame. the general consensus in this thread is that it can damage the frame, but as you are the critic and doubter, YOU must provide the evidence for why you doubt, other than word of mouth, because most of us have seen or heard of a situation where a racquet was mangled

are you arguing just to argue?

McLovin
09-24-2008, 06:34 AM
Well, you would string them all so you have a baseline. You can't perform a test unless you have something to compare it against. And furthermore, I don't think you understood the test.

For arguments sake, lets use a single frame, say, a Pro Staff 95. You would use 3 Pro Staff 95s and 'baseline' them by stringing them all the same way to get measurements. If you don't take initial measurements, you can't account for deviations in each frame.

Then, one of them is your control group, which you string again, accounting for any more deformations from regular stringing. Your other 2 are your tests, which will tell you if the racket characteristics change, and if so, by how much.

Your play tester informs you each step of the way if there is any change in the playabiltiy of the racket. Of course, you don't tell them which racket is which, or, for that matter, what you are trying to prove/disprove.

In real life, you would need more than one frame as a Pro Staff might be more resistant to half-stringing than say a Yonex RQS 55.

While your argument may appear sound, I would argue that since the racket is firmly supported by the 4 supports on the machine, and since there isn't any other outside force, that having it sit there isn't doing any more damage 1 hour later than it is 1 minute later.

That is really my beef. People say 'oh, 5 or 10 minutes is fine, but I wouldn't leave it any longer than that.' Why 5 or 10 minutes? Why not 5 or 10 seconds? or 5 or 10 hours? Where is the quantitative data that supports any argument? Yours, mine or anyone else's?

From my experience, I have seen no problems leaving it half-strung for an extended period of time. Do I like to do that? No. But it happens and I've yet to see any physical damage.

Cup8489
09-24-2008, 08:42 AM
Well, you would string them all so you have a baseline. You can't perform a test unless you have something to compare it against. And furthermore, I don't think you understood the test.

For arguments sake, lets use a single frame, say, a Pro Staff 95. You would use 3 Pro Staff 95s and 'baseline' them by stringing them all the same way to get measurements. If you don't take initial measurements, you can't account for deviations in each frame.

Then, one of them is your control group, which you string again, accounting for any more deformations from regular stringing. Your other 2 are your tests, which will tell you if the racket characteristics change, and if so, by how much.

Your play tester informs you each step of the way if there is any change in the playabiltiy of the racket. Of course, you don't tell them which racket is which, or, for that matter, what you are trying to prove/disprove.

In real life, you would need more than one frame as a Pro Staff might be more resistant to half-stringing than say a Yonex RQS 55.

While your argument may appear sound, I would argue that since the racket is firmly supported by the 4 supports on the machine, and since there isn't any other outside force, that having it sit there isn't doing any more damage 1 hour later than it is 1 minute later.

That is really my beef. People say 'oh, 5 or 10 minutes is fine, but I wouldn't leave it any longer than that.' Why 5 or 10 minutes? Why not 5 or 10 seconds? or 5 or 10 hours? Where is the quantitative data that supports any argument? Yours, mine or anyone else's?

From my experience, I have seen no problems leaving it half-strung for an extended period of time. Do I like to do that? No. But it happens and I've yet to see any physical damage.


i understood the experiment fine, it was your comment on using different models that led me to believe you wouldnt have a control in the experiment

i hope you dont ever deform a frame, but you're right, there is no hard proof other than word of mouth that is known, but the results are clear enough.

SW Stringer
09-24-2008, 08:52 AM
i can't give you empirical data because inherently not all frames are created equal. hed used the frame once already, strung by a usrsa certified stringer (at a tournament he was in) and when he broke the strings, he was putting more back in himself, had never had any issues with frames before, and it cracked. cosmetically there was nothing wrong, and there was apparently no pinging noises to indicate the frame's structural integrity was compromised.

i can't give you what you're asking for, there's no way to PROVE that it does affect a frame to leave it half-strung. but since you need proof that it does affect the frame, you need to prove to me, other than word-of-mouth, that it doesnt.

i'm inclined and biased to believe it does, as personal experience and instruction from certified stringers have told me. but what of you? what do you have to back up that it doesnt? scientifically, the stresses MUST affect it to a degree, and the longer the frame is left unbalanced by being half-strung, the stresses negatively affect the contruction of the frame exponentially. it's psychics, basic phsyics, that proves what i'm saying.

Why exponentially and not linearly or quadratically?

It's Psychic: as in lying outside the sphere of physical science or knowledge as in Madame Dejavu - Psychic and palm reader?:)

But if you mean that it's basic physics, then what part? I've got the Holt Physics book used in high school and I see nothing in the table of contents that addresses composite graphite structures. I see all the standard stuff: Motion and vectors, forces and the laws of motion, work and energy, momentum and collisions, rotational motion and the law of gravity, rotational equilibrium and dynamics, fluid mechanics, heat, thermodynamics, vibrations and waves, sound, light, electric forces, etc, etc. Perhaps you can pull out your old physics book and quote chapter and verse for us. Or if you have the book "Physics and Technology of Tennis" you can quote chapter and verse from that text. Thanks.

SW Stringer
09-26-2008, 09:39 AM
i can't give you empirical data because . . . it's psychics. . . .


Yeah, that's the ticket . . . it's psychics! :wink:

equinox
09-26-2008, 09:53 AM
I'll trust my own experience and the valued opinions of other expert stringers concerning the stresses racquets are placed under during stringing over SW's text book. I respectfully suggest SW_stringer does some research and educate himself before sprouting nonsense and continuing arguments without proper logic.

That is all.

Cup8489
09-26-2008, 09:54 AM
Yeah, that's the ticket . . . it's psychics! :wink:

you could be less of a complete ***.
maybe you should try it.

oh, and exponentially because as a frame's stucture breaks down, it's easier and easier for individual graphite strands to compress, because less and less of the frame is structurally sound.

and why the hell would it be quadratically? do you know much of anything about physics? apparently not. trying to sound smart and actually being smart are two different things

not that i'm smart, i'm stupid, but i know the difference between mathematical terms.

SW Stringer
09-26-2008, 12:42 PM
you could be less of a complete ***.
maybe you should try it. . . .


I'm sorry and I beg your pardon. I thought you knew that a smiley face with a wink graphic meant that I was just kidding. I'm wrong, you apparently are not psychic. Let us know when you're back on your medications and not so sensitive to shuckin' and jivin'. Next time I'll try to be just half an arse! :-?

SW Stringer
09-26-2008, 12:57 PM
I'll trust my own experience and the valued opinions of other expert stringers concerning the stresses racquets are placed under during stringing over SW's text book. I respectfully suggest SW_stringer does some research and educate himself before sprouting nonsense and continuing arguments without proper logic.

That is all.

Sorry to dissapoint you but I didn't find anything in the Holt Physics book about tennis frame streses, or anthing even remotely close. So I was asking the other gentleman if he could cite a reference. Apparently he hasn't been able to do so. No nonsense, just a straight forward question since someone else brought up the topic of Physics (I think). And no logic involved either. Simple, straight questions. Your level of response suggest that you have neither the time or patience or background to debate this issue at the substantive level.

Mansewerz
09-26-2008, 01:29 PM
Here's how I see it.

McLovin and SW_stringer are saying no one has proved it yet.

Cup is saying no one has disproved it.

My opinion: Stay on the safe side and don't leave it for an extended period of time.

tennisfreak15347
09-26-2008, 08:00 PM
Here's how I see it.

McLovin and SW_stringer are saying no one has proved it yet.

Cup is saying no one has disproved it.

My opinion: Stay on the safe side and don't leave it for an extended period of time.

one person on these boards finished all their mains, took it off the mounting system for the night, and when he returned to string the crosses, the frame was already broken. This cannot be denied. When there is an inward pull on the top of the head and throat of the frame, but not sides, this causes an un-even balance and WILL, let me make it clear, it WILL deform the frame. Pink to catch your eye, ;].

Mansewerz
09-26-2008, 09:54 PM
one person on these boards finished all their mains, took it off the mounting system for the night, and when he returned to string the crosses, the frame was already broken. This cannot be denied. When there is an inward pull on the top of the head and throat of the frame, but not sides, this causes an un-even balance and WILL, let me make it clear, it WILL deform the frame. Pink to catch your eye, ;].

Tsk, tsk, tsk, that's not pink, it's magenta.


Yes, I do however agree that there will be some deformation. However, it usually is reversed with the installation of the crosses. Plus, that guy took it off the mounting system, a major no no.

zapvor
09-27-2008, 11:50 AM
i agree with most of the things mentioned. now consider this:

to pull any string (or anything) that can withstand 50-60lbs of tension means the force is pretty great. if you ever used one of those elastic bands at the gym and tried to stretch it you have the idea. so, given such a large amount of force being applied to the string and the racket in turn would indicate a certain degree of stress to the frame. i have no experiment and no numbers to prove this, but i think its safe to say that we can agree with is true and fact. finally, isnt it better to be on the safe side?

jim e
09-27-2008, 01:01 PM
What has ever happened to following proper techinque, to get consistant results? Is it not best for stringers to try to do their best to get consistant results? Even if leaving a partially strung racquet in a machine does not break the racquet, will the stringbed be of consistant results, as strings do relax, will the strings 1st placed in there, have more time to relax, and ever equal the later placed strings.There seems to be a # of variables, like angulation of strings on pulls, friction, etc. that can make the stringing not ideal. Why introduce another variable, like a partially strung racquet in the mix, if there is no reason to do it.
I would think, if people here string there own, they would want the best they can do, and should do the same for whoever they string for.
Then there are others , like the big box stores where I saw once a racquet in a machine, 1/2 the mains were installed all on 1 side, and was left that way, I did not see a stringer in that store for the 30-45 min. I was there.(it would not have mattered if I saw him, and he told me to prove his technique wrong) , the store I was in before had a stringer double pulling all the strings, crosses and mains, and he was talking to a customer there, telling him how fast he strings, and how many he does. He really impressed that customer. Makes you sick to see that.Those are the stringers that don't care of the customers as they just work for min. wage, and are the box stores customers.That is why I never gave them my racquets, and I started to string again.
Bottom line, follow good proper techniques, do the best you can to get the best consistant job you can do and no one can fault you.
Anyone can buy a good racquet, but it is the strings that have the stringers signature to it, should it not be the best it can be?

Mansewerz
09-27-2008, 01:14 PM
What has ever happened to following proper techinque, to get consistant results? Is it not best for stringers to try to do their best to get consistant results? Even if leaving a partially strung racquet in a machine does not break the racquet, will the stringbed be of consistant results, as strings do relax, will the strings 1st placed in there, have more time to relax, and ever equal the later placed strings.There seems to be a # of variables, like angulation of strings on pulls, friction, etc. that can make the stringing not ideal. Why introduce another variable, like a partially strung racquet in the mix, if there is no reason to do it.
I would think, if people here string there own, they would want the best they can do, and should do the same for whoever they string for.
Then there are others , like the big box stores where I saw once a racquet in a machine, 1/2 the mains were installed all on 1 side, and was left that way, I did not see a stringer in that store for the 30-45 min. I was there.(it would not have mattered if I saw him, and he told me to prove his technique wrong) , the store I was in before had a stringer double pulling all the strings, crosses and mains, and he was talking to a customer there, telling him how fast he strings, and how many he does. He really impressed that customer. Makes you sick to see that.Those are the stringers that don't care of the customers as they just work for min. wage, and are the box stores customers.That is why I never gave them my racquets, and I started to string again.
Bottom line, follow good proper techniques, do the best you can to get the best consistant job you can do and no one can fault you.
Anyone can buy a good racquet, but it is the strings that have the stringers signature to it, should it not be the best it can be?


QFT. Even if it doesn't mess up the frame, the string bed is messed up.