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View Full Version : do fish oil pills spoil?


Mbautista
09-22-2008, 05:41 PM
the ones i have smell a bit funky but i've been taking them with no problems..

winter2334
09-22-2008, 05:54 PM
they all smell pretty funky is you ask me,except once i had these ones that had hint of lemon

superstition
09-22-2008, 10:49 PM
They have vitamin E in them to reduce spoilage, but I don't think they're so fresh. The best way to get fish oil is to eat the correct fish (oily low-mercury fish with omega 3 fats) like sardines. Unfortunately, a lot of those small oily fish are heavily salted when canned.

El Diablo
09-24-2008, 10:19 AM
Why is eating those fish a better way to get the oils than supplements? Is this a presumption? Concerning spoilage, flaxseed oil is said to be prone to spoil and refrigeration is recommended.

ollinger
09-24-2008, 11:24 AM
Good point. People sometimes assume a fresh source is the best. I've read lots of studies showing for example that frozen vegetables preserve nutrients better than most of the fresh vegetables you can buy. If you grow and pick them yourself, all the better I would guess.

Mystere
09-25-2008, 04:08 AM
I have been taking fish oil for well over a year. Love it. I didn't like eating sardines.

Do some research on it the stuff is amazing.

-Helps to thin the blood, heals arteries and keeps them clear. Just dont take to many 1 a day is plenty.

SystemicAnomaly
09-25-2008, 06:31 AM
Why is eating those fish a better way to get the oils than supplements? Is this a presumption? Concerning spoilage, flaxseed oil is said to be prone to spoil and refrigeration is recommended.

It is true that the LNA (aka ALA) in flaxseed oil is highly susceptible to light and heat. Whole flax seeds are much less susceptible, while ground seeds should be protected from heat & light moreso than whole seeds.

The EPA and DHA in fish oil have longer chains & more double bonds than the LNA found in plant sources. This makes them more susceptible to light & heat than LNA according to Udo Erasmus (Fats that Heal, Fats that Kill). Fish oil supplements should be encapsulated in opaque capsules rather than clear capsules and should be kept away from heat sources since the oils will deteriorate rapidly if exposed to light/heat.

The fish itself will have some protective effects on the DHA & EPA that it contains but still should be eaten fresh. Eating sardines have an advantage over fish oil supplements in that is also contains other nutrients -- CoQ10, DMAE (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DMAE#Biochemical_precursor), Calcium, Vitamin B12, Vitamin D, and protein. Salmon is also an excellent source of DHA, EPA and other nutrients.

ollinger
09-25-2008, 06:44 AM
Since CoQ10 is a coenzyme in the Krebs Cycle, I would think that just about anything you eat would contain it.

SystemicAnomaly
09-25-2008, 06:45 AM
Bela-Olhão looks like a good source for sardines: MyBela.com (http://www.mybela.com/)


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SystemicAnomaly
09-26-2008, 03:26 AM
Since CoQ10 is a coenzyme in the Krebs Cycle, I would think that just about anything you eat would contain it.

Not really. Yes, the human body does produce CoQ10 on its own. However, young healthy individuals tend to produce more than older folks or people with certain conditions or health problems. Altho' more studies are required, there is strong evidence that suggests that dietary CoQ10 has a number of heart benefits as well as being beneficial for the brain, for the skin, for migraine headaches, and more.

Fedace
09-26-2008, 04:07 AM
the ones i have smell a bit funky but i've been taking them with no problems..

Take Omega 3, they are better

CanadianChic
09-26-2008, 06:43 AM
the ones i have smell a bit funky but i've been taking them with no problems..

I take fish oil as well and swear by them. They are great for the skin and hair (very important when you live in a very dry area like mine in the winter) and according to the pharmacist they lower cholesterol (personally not a problem but it doesn't hurt). Anyway, the container I have has an expiry date of approximately two years from the time of purchase, so my question is...when did you buy them? All supplements have an odour of some kind, depending on the product and company they all differ. I smelled mine (the things I do in the name of offering advice) and they smell a little like hay. I think as long as they were purchased not too long ago, you should be fine. If this is bothering you and you can't move past it, just buy a new bottle for your piece of mind.

SystemicAnomaly
09-26-2008, 11:46 PM
... The best way to get fish oil is to eat the correct fish (oily low-mercury fish with omega 3 fats) like sardines. Unfortunately, a lot of those small oily fish are heavily salted when canned.

Salt (brine) is added to canned sardines to preserve them. I have never come across rancid canned sardines, even in those where the sodium content is very low. Crown Prince and Bela-Olhão (see link in previous post) are much lower (60-80% less) in sodium than most brands.

Another sardine favorite of mine is King (http://www.kingoscar.no/KingOscar/main.nsf/pages/60018028EF5DE43FC1256B430052FBC9)Oscar (http://www.kingoscar.no/KingOscar/main.nsf/pages/60018028EF5DE43FC1256B430052FBC9) sardines (http://www.kingoscar.no/KingOscar/main.nsf/pages/60018028EF5DE43FC1256B430052FBC9) in fish oil. the fish oil used in this particular King Oscar product is salmon oil. This combination of sardine+salmon oil is very high in omega 3 fatty acids.

SystemicAnomaly
09-27-2008, 12:06 AM
Take Omega 3, they are better

It is proably best to get your omega 3 fatty acids from both plant (primarily flax) & fish (especially salmon & sardines) sources. Plant sources will have its omega-3 as LNA (aka ALA) whereas fish sources will be predominantly DHA & EPA.

While LNA, itself, has some nutritional benefit, probably the greatest benefit is from the conversion of LNA into EPA which is further converted into DHA. Unfortunately, only a small % of LNA is converted into EPA & DHA by most humans. On the plus side, the EPA and DHA that the body produces from the conversion of LNA is the freshest source possible (according to "fat" expert, Udo Ersamus, in his book, Fats that Heal, Fats that Kill).

For vegetarians, there is an alternative to fish sources besides flax. DHA can be derived from certain algae. To a much lesser degree, EPA can also be derived from these micro-algae sources. Fortunately, DHA can be back-converted to EPA. These algae sources of DHA are commonly known as vegetarian DHA or DHA Neuromins. For vegetarians, this source of DHA combined with ground flax seed (containing LNA) is the way to go rather than relying on only 1 or the other.