PDA

View Full Version : IS EASTERN GRIP BETTER


Printer099
03-29-2004, 03:08 PM
I use a semi-western grip which I heard it better for hitting high balls,but I am having trouble hitting through balls in general. Would switiching to a Eastern grip make it easier for me to hit through balls in general? Also is it true that Eastern is easier to hit low balls but harder to hit high balls???

Bungalo Bill
03-29-2004, 04:32 PM
The Eastern grip is easier to hit lower balls and also is effective in hitting balls about chest high but not as good as the SW grip.

You need to weigh out the benefits of each grip and how it suits your game before switching. I would not switch grips just because you cant hit through the ball. If you cant hit through the ball now, what makes you think you're going to hit through the ball on an Eastern grip?

What you need to do is learn to hit through the ball with your current grip by stabilizing your elbow moving forward. What is most likely happening is you're brushing the ball thinking you need to have more wipe up then going through. This is a common problem and you need to learn to balance the two forces.

I am only a fan of the windshield wiping technique if it is done correctly. You can't get around physics. You still have to go through the ball to make it go forward with more power. No matter what technique you choose.

Email me for some footage on how Roddick hits his forehand, or for that matter, how a lot of pros hit their forehands. You will be surprised that there is not as much "brush" as there is forward movement. You will also be surprised as to the stability in their strokes for clean contact. The pros just do things much faster. This makes it appear that they are whipping their wrists around and flinging their racquets to and fro to hit these massive shots. This is not the truth. The truth is the pros have developed a solid foundation of hitting through the ball. As they get stronger they can do more things to the ball but also have to stay within the laws of physics.

my email is usptapro@cox.net, I can help you rebuild that forehand.

edge
03-30-2004, 08:40 AM
You will hit through the ball better with an eastern grip a la Sampras, Davenport and Tracy Austin. Just remember to finish high to impart topsin to keep the ball on the court. Your FH will be more penetrating with less spin.

jun
03-30-2004, 03:57 PM
Hitting through is not a that fucntion of grip, or not as much as some people think. It does make it tough to flatten it out as go more towards western.

predrag
03-31-2004, 08:47 AM
I use a semi-western grip which I heard it better for hitting high balls,but I am having trouble hitting through balls in general. Would switiching to a Eastern grip make it easier for me to hit through balls in general? Also is it true that Eastern is easier to hit low balls but harder to hit high balls???

Switching to Eastern Grip will force you to hit through the ball, since going for the excessive brush would launch the ball over the fence.
However I would not advise this change since it might force you to close the racquet face too soon.
I remember Helena Sukova having this problem, which led to erratic forehand.

You should swing through the ball, and actually think as if you are hitting three balls, not just one, one foot apart, lined up on the direction of your swing.

Regards, Predrag

chad shaver
03-31-2004, 11:36 AM
I've been working on the switch from a semi-western to an eastern grip. I find that I can hit the ball harder, more consistently and more accurately with the eastern. No doubt though, that high balls are harder to handle. That part takes a lot of practice.

In the end, though, I would say to each his own. Try them both and see which is best for you.

Good luck and happy hitting.

Frank Silbermann
04-01-2004, 05:01 AM
Even though the Eastern grip is not popular on the pro tour these days, if you use it at least you'll have the satisfaction of hitting the ball correctly.

The Eastern grip is the correct grip; the Continental is unorthodox; and the Western grip is incorrect -- especially on the backhand. This is not merely opinion -- I have 50 years of authorities to back me up on this.

Perhaps the invention of a synthetic surface that plays more like grass will correct the current situation where the vast majority of pros are a bad influence on developing players.

PhatAbbott
04-01-2004, 06:56 AM
What exactly is incorrect about it ?

Alot of players play with eastern grips but are less successful. Its just essayer to use more western grips due to the extra amount of topspin you can create and the more natural swing path.

predrag
04-01-2004, 08:34 AM
What exactly is incorrect about it ?

That is also my question.
I prefer SW grip myself. Eastern grip is too vulnerable to the high bouncing balls, and might be tougher when player wants to hit with topspin.

I feel that SW is the most versatile grip.

Hitting through the ball is just a matter of the swing.

Somebody mentioned side baseball pitch. I find this as a perfect description.
The point is, it is needed to have racquet moving forward, not up.

Regards, Predrag

@wright
04-01-2004, 09:15 AM
are oranges better than apples?

chad shaver
04-01-2004, 09:53 AM
"The Eastern grip is the correct grip; the Continental is unorthodox; and the Western grip is incorrect -- especially on the backhand. This is not merely opinion -- I have 50 years of authorities to back me up on this."

Makes me want to switch back to a semi-western. Wasn't the overhand serve considered incorrect and/or illegal at one time?

Tim Tennis
04-01-2004, 10:05 AM
I am an absolute believer in the SW grip. I was surprised to read that Chad is trying to switch from the SW to an Eastern forehand. On my web site I find it is usually the other way around. Most people learn with the EF grip and are trying to move to the SW. They notice that they are getting beat by people using the SW grip to generate a lot more spin and action on the ball then they can using the EF.

Frank S. likes the EF but what has happened on the tour the players with the SW or the W grip can hit the heavy high bouncing balls which places the EF players at a great disadvantage. That is why he wants the type of surface that will keep the balls lower. As far as Pete, I didn't see him wanting to stay on the baseline and exchange a lot of strokes with these players.

BB says, "You need to learn to balance the two forces." That is the upward and forward motion. I could not agree with him more. If you go to the SW grip, hold your racquet still and lay your wrist back as far as you can and them more it forward as far as you can you will notice it moves your racquet at about a 45 degree angle. That is why I love the SW so much. It balances both forces.
Do this with the EF and it will move your racquet forward on a level plane. Maybe that is why some people feel they can hit through the ball better with the EF. There is certainly more forward energy and it does not require the amount of racquet head speed to hit with the SE or W grips. Go to the W and your racquet will move straight up. Basically the EF for most people is a pushers grip. Yikes! I do disagree with BB slightly in that I think the pros use a lot of wrist with their SW or W grip. Most of them just incorporate it with their entire motion so perfectly it is hard to tell and like BB said some of them it just looks like they are moving their racquets all over.

You got to love the game.

SageOfDeath
02-12-2005, 10:55 PM
Even though the Eastern grip is not popular on the pro tour these days, if you use it at least you'll have the satisfaction of hitting the ball correctly.

The Eastern grip is the correct grip; the Continental is unorthodox; and the Western grip is incorrect -- especially on the backhand. This is not merely opinion -- I have 50 years of authorities to back me up on this.

Perhaps the invention of a synthetic surface that plays more like grass will correct the current situation where the vast majority of pros are a bad influence on developing players.

First Western grip is not "incorrect". (I don't care what your sources say but there isn't just ONE correct grip) It is an extreme grip that some do not like, but it is becoming more common in pro tournaments. Second, its possible to learn more than 1 grip and switch while you are playing. If someone chooses to use a certain grip, its their choice, but there are certain advantages and disadvantages. With a full western grip its very difficult to hit low shots. It also is hard to switch to because of the awkward angle, so some just switch to a Semi-Western grip. The advantage is that you it is easy to hit topspin especially on high balls (its actually hard not to hit with topspin with the full western grip) It also gives you more head racquet speed. To use a Western grip more efficiently you need to lift up, almost like you're jumping right before the point of contact. And another thing..... The invention of a synthetic surface that plays more like grass would most likely lead to the decline of people using the Western Grip because of the disadvantage. But there isn't any "situation". I think you are just flaming because you got whooped by someone using a Western Grip in a clay court. ;) Just Kidding with you.

alan-n
02-12-2005, 11:25 PM
Like BB said and he knows what he says, you can hit through the ball with any grip. All require the forearm muscle development / stabilty to drive through the ball. The more SW -> Western you go, the more you need to lead with your elbow than "punch" the racquet face through the ball.... If you think switching to an eastern grip will suddenly make hitting this shot easier, than you are mistaken.

It takes great timing and feel to drive the racquet face through the ball no matter what grip you use, if you have not developed that.... then forget it, this applies to every shot.

Marius_Hancu
02-13-2005, 06:31 AM
One serious consideration for the Eastern grip is the fact that it's easier on your body, especially for those having TE (Tennis Elbow).

For any such player, I'd say that the western is a NO NO (as others have mentioned on this board), taking into account the strain it puts on your elbow and related tendons.

Something else: I think that in terms of movement for the setup, the Eastern is less requiring.

Thus, while you are away from your best condition, either because of age or neglect or TE, you should seriously consider the Eastern. It's extremely solid and versatile.

Bungalo Bill
02-13-2005, 12:30 PM
One serious consideration for the Eastern grip is the fact that it's easier on your body, especially for those having TE (Tennis Elbow).

For any such player, I'd say that the western is a NO NO (as others have mentioned on this board), taking into account the strain it puts on your elbow and related tendons.

Something else: I think that in terms of movement for the setup, the Eastern is less requiring.

Thus, while you are away from your best condition, either because of age or neglect or TE, you should seriously consider the Eastern. It's extremely solid and versatile.

You have a point but you need to expand upon your knowledge.

The western grip can be hit with less stain on the elbow and forearm. The reason there is more strain is because the western grip provides the "option" to windshield wipe up the ball. This is the motion that can place a lot of strain on the elbow.

But if you lead with the elbow and take a more traditional low to high swing, one can enjoy a western grip for years.

The inherent problem with the eastern grip is controlling elbow roll. The wrist to the elbow tends to be less insnyc then with the Westerns. The Westerns provide a natural "lock down" of the wrist to the elbow for excellent racquet head control. This lock down can remain in effect throughout contact and provides a tremendous amount of power and control.

The Eastern grip does not provide this naturally. Therefore, it is easy for the elbow to roll and turn the racquet face up or down during the swing increasing the chances of an error. This happens especially when you are on the run. The elbow roll which moves around the racquet face can easily be a cause of numerous errors without the player realizing it.

In fact, I finally got the chance to hit balls today with a 4.0 player. He used an Eastern grip and had lots of movement in the elbow area. It is true that the elbow "leads" the rotation but it shouldnt move up or down or roll during the swing. This person took lots and lots of lessons and just wanted a better forehand. He is a Doctor and after playing for 15 minutes with him I told him the reason his forehand was good at times and bad at other times was that there is too much movement (rolling) with his elbow.

I taught him to lead the rotation with the elbow and draw a line forward with it. Dont raise it, turn it, or anything. Use the chest muscles and the shoulder muscles to hit through the ball. Bring the elbow through comfortably close to your body. His forehand improved tenfold and he was ripping his forehand.

With the Eastern grip, you have to lock down the wrist and firm it up. This helps to eliminate elbow roll.

Although I will support any grip choice of a player. All have there pros and cons. However, I will always believe the SW grip provides the best of both worlds and is a tremendously versatile grip.

Marius_Hancu
02-13-2005, 12:36 PM
The inherent problem with the eastern grip is control. The wrist to the elbow tends to be less in sync then with the Westerns.

Yes. I didn't want to elaborate on this one.

We'll see in time how the current generation of Westerners will be aging in terms of TE. I am not as optimistic as you seem to be.

Marius_Hancu
02-13-2005, 12:42 PM
I taught him to lead the rotation with the elbow and draw a line forward with it. Dont raise it, turn it, or anything. Use the chest muscles and the shoulder muscles to hit through the ball. Bring the elbow through comfortably close to your body. His forehand improved tenfold and he was ripping his forehand.

Yes.

I tell the guys asking me for advice to go to a fitness room (where there are large mirrors) a simulate a FH in tai chi style, very very slo-mo, and watch the path of the racket and the elbow from the side and the front. It's amazing what people realize when they're able to watch themselves.

vin
02-16-2005, 12:05 PM
I like using an in between grip. Basically it's a semi western with the bottom of the base knuckle of my index finger on the very bottom of the side panel (panel 3). This is instead of the bottom of the base knuckle being directly and completely on panel 4. I find that this gives me better support and leverage to hit through the ball while maintaining the benefits of the semi western grip.

Not sure if it makes a difference, but my racquet has a tour style handle.

I think this in between grip is what Agassi uses and I think I know why. :)

Rickson
02-16-2005, 01:27 PM
I use a semi-western grip which I heard it better for hitting high balls,but I am having trouble hitting through balls in general. Would switiching to a Eastern grip make it easier for me to hit through balls in general? Also is it true that Eastern is easier to hit low balls but harder to hit high balls???
The eastern forehand grip is good for a chip and charge player so if you like to volley, use this type of forehand. The semiwestern is a great grip for baseliners who like to exchange topspin rallies, but if your opponent thrives on high bouncing balls, you might want to mix it up a bit with the efh grip. I sometimes wait for my opponent to get in a groove on topspin rallies, then I switch to the efh and flatten the ball out. The lower bounce and deeper ball throws him off enough to force an error. Many people feel you should stick to one forehand grip during rallies, but I got used to split second grip changes so you might be able to as well. You might consider trying the topspin to flat ball change up, it really frustrates opponents.

Frank Silbermann
02-16-2005, 06:08 PM
First Western grip is not "incorrect". (I don't care what your sources say but there isn't just ONE correct grip) It is an extreme grip that some do not like, but it is becoming more common in pro tournaments. I've seen tennis books that say quite explicitly that the western grip is incorrect. Not just one book, but lots of old tennis books. Who are you gonna believe, the books or your own lying eyes?

Bungalo Bill
02-17-2005, 07:59 AM
Like BB said and he knows what he says, you can hit through the ball with any grip. All require the forearm muscle development / stabilty to drive through the ball. The more SW -> Western you go, the more you need to lead with your elbow than "punch" the racquet face through the ball.... If you think switching to an eastern grip will suddenly make hitting this shot easier, than you are mistaken.

It takes great timing and feel to drive the racquet face through the ball no matter what grip you use, if you have not developed that.... then forget it, this applies to every shot.

I like this reply about the elbow. Very good observation.

Rickson
02-17-2005, 09:48 AM
I still prefer the semi-western grip.

fastdunn
02-17-2005, 11:25 AM
In fact, I finally got the chance to hit balls today with a 4.0 player. He used an Eastern grip and had lots of movement in the elbow area. It is true that the elbow "leads" the rotation but it shouldnt move up or down or roll during the swing. This person took lots and lots of lessons and just wanted a better forehand. He is a Doctor and after playing for 15 minutes with him I told him the reason his forehand was good at times and bad at other times was that there is too much movement (rolling) with his elbow.


This sounds like a description about me. ha ha ha. I'm not a medical doctor but
different sort of doctor. Similar usta rating. Use eastern grip and my forehand is
consistent but lacks a punch.

When I picked up this game for the 1st time, I was advised to use subtle
grip changes for verstilities and bigger potential. I think I developed more
varieties thanks to that, but as amateurs with limited time, we often find
ourselves going nowhere focusing too much on the potential.
I feel like I could have been better off starting out FH with semi-western
and then experiment with eastern/verstilities later....

JackD
02-17-2005, 11:48 AM
When hitting with ball (excluding the defensive lob and drop shot) the raq face is verticle within a few degrees. Grips can be used to help a player find that verticle contact point within their own personal preference. Each grip as positives and negative most come from ball height and its relation to a verticle face. With a real high ball the more westernized grips allow for a verticle contact point better than the eastern. The opposite is true for low balls. The grip does not determine the amount of spin you can generate, its the amount of upward movement pre-contact. This is why the original poster was looking to switch grips but Bill was wise to say that they need to swing "through" the ball more. A grip change is going to mess up your contact point which isn't the problem (its probably already verticle), its the shape of your swing. I'd work on your swing shape before changing from SW to Eastern (I'm not biased I play out of the eastern and like it)

LionsNC
02-17-2005, 07:00 PM
I use a semi-western grip which I heard it better for hitting high balls,but I am having trouble hitting through balls in general. Would switiching to a Eastern grip make it easier for me to hit through balls in general? Also is it true that Eastern is easier to hit low balls but harder to hit high balls???


Printer099, you sound like you have the exact same problem as me, I have tried both the EF and SW and have struggled badly with hitting through the ball, I do hit through a little better with the EF, but I find myself switch back to the SW out of habit. I think BB hit the nail on the head it really doesn't matter which grip you use, the problem is more in the overall stroke.

troytennisbum
02-17-2005, 07:12 PM
NO, The Eastern Grip is NOT better

splink779
02-17-2005, 08:57 PM
I've seen tennis books that say quite explicitly that the western grip is incorrect. Not just one book, but lots of old tennis books. Who are you gonna believe, the books or your own lying eyes?

Key word here being OLD. None of the grips are incorrect, not even the crazy Hawaiian grip. The game has evolved, and not everyone hits eastern forehands. Tell Federer Moya or Roddick that they are doing it incorrectly. They'll laugh and promptly smack you in the face with a semi-western/western motion.

paulfreda
02-17-2005, 11:10 PM
I've seen tennis books that say quite explicitly that the western grip is incorrect. Not just one book, but lots of old tennis books. Who are you gonna believe, the books or your own lying eyes?

Personally, I think Frank is just having fun with us here.

But what the heck ....
How can a grip (Nadal's) that wiped both Roddick and Fish off the court in the 2004 Davis Cup finals be ....... "incorrect" ???

I agree that the SW is the most versatile grip.


For an interesting look at historical grip evolution, see ......
http://tennis.about.com/od/forehandbackhand/a/evolprofhgrips.htm

Serve-And-Volley
02-20-2005, 07:07 PM
The eastern grip is good at low balls and helps with slice and underspin but as far as high balls I have never had success with it. I think the semi-western grip you use is perfect. A suggestion if you can't deal with the low ball do what I do but the Connors sidespin on it and keep the racquet face sort of open (not closed like when you are going to hit a topspin shot). If you keep the semi-western and practice with it, you will find more accuracy and consistency. Good luck.

redhawk60014
02-20-2005, 10:10 PM
A SOLID TENNIS PLAYER, USES A VARIETY OF DIFFERENT SHOTS AND USES DIFFERENT GRIPS DEPENDING ON THE HEIGHT OF THE BALL COMING AT YOU.

continental is the grip to use on volleys, overheads, serves= period!!
eastern can be used on groundies and for hitting FLAT serves.
semi western and western are used for hitting balls with heavy topspin and for balls that bounce high up on you. reason for that is that with the western/ semi western grips, you can drive through from 6 oclock to 12 oclock and get great shoulder rotation through the shot.
with eastern grip on high balls= forces you to BLOCK the incoming ball back because you have difficulties rotating through the shot= you shoulders and elbows are fully extended.

EASTERN IS GREAT FOR THE TWO HANDED BACK HAND AND FOR BALLS below your shoulders.
you can hit a western shot virtually anytime provided that you can BRUSH UP through the low shot= you have to get to the back of the ball and hit low to high..

I WOULD STICK WITH SEMIWESTERN FOR MID HEIGHT TO HIGH BALLS AND FOR TOPSPIN SHOTS and USE EASTERN FOR shot in which you need to drive right through them. eastern for low and midrange balls.

HOPE THIS HELPS

Bungalo Bill
02-21-2005, 04:32 PM
A SOLID TENNIS PLAYER, USES A VARIETY OF DIFFERENT SHOTS AND USES DIFFERENT GRIPS DEPENDING ON THE HEIGHT OF THE BALL COMING AT YOU.

continental is the grip to use on volleys, overheads, serves= period!!
eastern can be used on groundies and for hitting FLAT serves.
semi western and western are used for hitting balls with heavy topspin and for balls that bounce high up on you. reason for that is that with the western/ semi western grips, you can drive through from 6 oclock to 12 oclock and get great shoulder rotation through the shot.
with eastern grip on high balls= forces you to BLOCK the incoming ball back because you have difficulties rotating through the shot= you shoulders and elbows are fully extended.

EASTERN IS GREAT FOR THE TWO HANDED BACK HAND AND FOR BALLS below your shoulders.
you can hit a western shot virtually anytime provided that you can BRUSH UP through the low shot= you have to get to the back of the ball and hit low to high..

I WOULD STICK WITH SEMIWESTERN FOR MID HEIGHT TO HIGH BALLS AND FOR TOPSPIN SHOTS and USE EASTERN FOR shot in which you need to drive right through them. eastern for low and midrange balls.

HOPE THIS HELPS

Not so fast, the Easterns are also a good volley grip and so are inbetween grips.

You can also use an eastern backhand grip for spin serves.

As far as having people switch grips on the groundstrokes, I can buy that but it does not need to be exaggerated. A player with their main grip as an Eastern can improve their positioning so they can take balls more in their strike zone.

JackD
02-21-2005, 04:51 PM
I'm with you BB. I was taught to volley out of the cont. but have recently switched to volley with the eastern grips and its night and day different.(I much prefer to volley with easterns) (I was an "open" level player who served and volleyed w/ the cont so I feel as if I can farily compare the two). So I completely disagree with Red hawk's cont for the volleys "period".(If you want my rational redhawk let me know) Also redhawk in the sentence after "volleys, serves, overheads.PERIOD!" you say that eastern is good for a flat serve. (I actually disagree with that if your fundamentals are proper on the serve the cont is better to hit flat) I'm just pointing out that you contradicted yourself because its confusing not to be a jerk, sorry if thats how its coming across. I'm just reacting to your post maybe you didn't mean what you but in there.

FiveO
02-21-2005, 05:03 PM
IMHO the Eastern is not superior to SW and I believe that your stated problem of not being able to hit through the ball is a swing path problem more than a grip problem. I'll cite Lindsay Davenport as the perfect example of a user of a SW FH which on demand she can flatten out. Focus on keeping the racket face stable and in line with the ball through the hitting zone for a longer period of time.
I actually believe so much so in the SW that 2 years ago I decided to "modernize" my game and switch from the traditional eastern FH to SW. I use continental on serve, volleys and overhead and eastern on my one-handed backhand. As I age and my opponents seem to become younger I found I was having more and more problems handling the higher bounding SW and Western forehands being hit into what was my strength. I've made the change and have really not found a problem handling lower bouncing balls to that side. I believe the more "extreme" western and continental FH grips are exponentially more limiting.
Also grip changes are not easy to make. Grip changes dictate changes in footwork, stances, strike zones and contact points. Not easy for most. They take time and periods of set-backs and plateaus. Grip changes require absolute commitment as well as a willingness to be worse before you get better, maybe. Unless you have extremely gifted hands I would not advocate using multiple grips on the FH side. Robert Landsdorp, teacher of the traditional eastern grips and strokes of Tracy Austin and Pete Sampras, now states that he favors teaching a "strong eastern" to SW grip on the FH combined with a less extreme swing path he refers to simply as the "topspin drive". He stated that he believes the SW to provide more margin for error while not limiting the players ability to flatten it out and hit thru the court. Whatever you decide, good luck.

Superior_Forehand
02-21-2005, 05:24 PM
I've seen tennis books that say quite explicitly that the western grip is incorrect. Not just one book, but lots of old tennis books. Who are you gonna believe, the books or your own lying eyes?

This has got to be some kind of joke...get with the times, old man.

FiveO
02-21-2005, 05:59 PM
Hey Superior Forehand, what's w/ the old man crack. I may be forty-s.........Oh, I see that you were targeting another writer........Carry on my young friend............That older guy probably has got a few years on me anyway...........It's nap time here at the hacienda

(I think Frank might be putting us on. Either that or one of us is mixing our medications again)

Superior_Forehand
02-21-2005, 06:52 PM
Hahah, FiveO. Mayebe the Old Man thing was the wrong thing to say. Most older guys have great placement and awesome strategy. I was just refering to the guy who seems to think that the Eastern grip is the only "correct" grip to use and all other grips are are "incorrect".

FiveO
02-21-2005, 07:10 PM
Superior FH I wasn't offended. I actually agree w/ you. In the right hands, on the right surface almost any grip extreme or not can be the correct grip. Horses for courses. I just happen to believe that on the forehand somewhere between eastern and SW happen to be the most versatile, and easiest for most players to employ.

Superior_Forehand
02-21-2005, 07:12 PM
yeah, my forehand tends toward SW, but it doesnt get more western than that. It seems to work for me. With my swing I will launch any forehands hit with eastern out of the court though.

Guga_x
02-22-2005, 05:29 AM
I learned to play with the eastern FH, and naturally have evolved to the SW.

And I couldn't agree more with BB on this one. Along with the change I lost weight on my shot, not because of the grip change directly, but because I have change my swingpath, and was now brushing up on the ball and not hitting through the ball, as I should.

i have been working on it, but still when in pressure I tend to start brushing instead of hitting that damn thing.

So try to work on your swing prior to changing grips...

TheNatural
02-22-2005, 08:00 AM
why do people keep saying eastern forehands are not good for high balls. Steffi Graf smacked the hell out of high balls.

Bungalo Bill
02-22-2005, 08:36 AM
why do people keep saying eastern forehands are not good for high balls. Steffi Graf smacked the hell out of high balls.

Exactly. Although the Westerns are more natural concerning the swing path, the Eastern can hit high balls. Adjustments in the swing path and maybe your body position and body level need to be adjusted, but you couldnt be more right.

kevhen
02-22-2005, 09:14 AM
Slice and topspin serves are the only shots you can't hit well with an Eastern grip. But you can hit overheads with an eastern grip. Vollies, especially backhand vollies might be better with continental. If you want more spin and margin of error on your groundstrokes while hitting hard then SW is probably better, but I use eastern myself.

Bungalo Bill
02-22-2005, 05:06 PM
Slice and topspin serves are the only shots you can't hit well with an Eastern grip. But you can hit overheads with an eastern grip. Vollies, especially backhand vollies might be better with continental. If you want more spin and margin of error on your groundstrokes while hitting hard then SW is probably better, but I use eastern myself.

Ummmmm....kevhen, this instruction is a bit empty. The continental grip is the preferred grip for overheads as well. For the same reasons that it is the preferred grip for the serve.

As far as margin is concerned, the eastern forehand grip can provide a very good margin for error if topspin is applied.

How you hit the ball determines the net clearance and the power you can provide while keeping the ball in the court. An eastern forehand grip is a very versatile grip.

liquidmetal
02-23-2005, 05:38 PM
Can anyone email me some pics of eastern and western style gripping techniques...

thxs....

FiveO
02-23-2005, 06:06 PM
Liquidmetal,

Here's a link showing the different grips. It's not great, but here it is:

www.tennis.com/instruction/fullstory.sps?inewsid=25693&itype=1481

vin
02-24-2005, 08:51 AM
All this discussion has instigated me to experiment a bit.

As I said earlier, I use a a grip in between the Eastern and SW. I've gone back and forth between this grip and a full SW many times, but it is with the in between grip that I was finally able to get clean and solid contact consistently. I think having the the hand just a bit more behind the grip facilitated this.

A few days ago I figured I'd try the full SW again. I was able to transfer what I learned from the inbetween grip which is pretty much being able to hit through the ball every time. I found that I was hitting more topspin, had more control, and could generate about the same amount of power. I was also much more effective at hitting short angled shots with more topspin, especially on low balls.

The problem is that for me the positioning required to hit through is a bit more akward with the full SW and I lose the feel for it more often. I think I'll stick with it a bit and see if I can work it out. It's amazing how much difference there is just from turning my hand on the grip 1/4 of an inch.

As an aside, I'm surprised that people are saying that grip has nothing to do with topspin production. I think that having the base knuckle of your index finger more underneath the grip gives you more leverage to push the racquet head low to high (brush) through pronation.

I think this is the reason why the SW grip is most versatile, and also why it is harder for some (me included) to master. The leverage of the grip is divided between the bottom and the back of the grip. The divided leverage allows the versatility to hit flat or with a lot of topspin, but being able to apply the leverage either ways at will can be a challenge to learn.

kevhen
02-24-2005, 12:43 PM
Continental might be preferred by many for overheads but it's not the only grip. Eastern can work quite well for overheads since you are closer to net and have more court to hit into and don't need the extra topspin to get the ball to land in. So continental seems less valuable on overheads that it would be for serves for your average height player. But if you are used to serving with continental then the continental overhead might feel more natural.

Bungalo Bill
02-24-2005, 01:44 PM
Continental might be preferred by many for overheads but it's not the only grip. Eastern can work quite well for overheads since you are closer to net and have more court to hit into and don't need the extra topspin to get the ball to land in. So continental seems less valuable on overheads that it would be for serves for your average height player. But if you are used to serving with continental then the continental overhead might feel more natural.

Kevhen you are in your own world.

The Continental is not less valuable because you hit an overhead from different areas of the court. The continental allows you to hit a flat ball with a little topspin to keep the ball IN the court from different locations BECAUSE of the shorter court.

Again, your "tips" are sub-standard.