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View Full Version : How much sleep should a 15 year old boy get?


Kenny022593
10-02-2008, 03:39 AM
Just as the title says haha how much sleep should a 15 year old boy get?

ThA_Azn_DeViL
10-02-2008, 03:42 AM
Dude, honestly i cant say anymore, everybody nowadays just stays up to whenever they want and then they wake up at 12 o' clock at noon the next day, its so sad that our society is drifting into the night time. I'd suggest about 6-8 hours at least, preferably 8. But really, you should end up with more than that =)

SystemicAnomaly
10-02-2008, 03:56 AM
At that age, you might not need 8 hours every night but you should definitely be getting more than 6.5 hours every night. You would probably be better off with 7 to 7.5 hours a night. Experiment a bit to find out what seems to be optimum -- you want to wake up at the end of a sleep cycle (during REM or stage 1), not in the middle of a cycle (stage 3 or stage 4 = deep sleep). You might even find that you may require more than 8 hours. However, if you appear to be going much more than 9.5 or 10 hours very often, you may be going one or 2 sleep cycle too many.

If you cannot wake up easily and remember your dreams, then you are probably not waking up a the right time (during a light stage of sleep). For more info about sleep cycles and to get a better idea of when you should wake up, check the following post:

tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?p=2717342 (http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?p=2717342)

Let your body & mental alertness be your guide. If you get the proper amount of sleep, you should find that your tennis game is more consistent and your ability to think clearly & perform mental tasks is enhanced.

.

Rickson
10-02-2008, 07:13 PM
The truth is that most hs students don't get enough sleep and they average only 6 hours on school nights and a lot more during non school nights, but they sleep at a much later time on non school nights for obvious reasons. Try to squeeze in at least 7 because it's only 1 hour away from optimal, but it's still better than most students your age.

DaKinG
10-03-2008, 01:25 PM
People should get at least 8 hours of sleep each day.

SystemicAnomaly
10-03-2008, 01:38 PM
People should get at least 8 hours of sleep each day.

Research has shown that it is probably closer to 7.5 hours (or a little more than 7) for most adults and adolescents. Compare the graphic below to the graphic (http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?p=2717342) in the link in post #3 (http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?p=2717342) -

http://www.ultracrepidate.com/wp-content/uploads/2007/01/sleep_cycle.jpg

bumfluff
10-03-2008, 03:26 PM
This is on a similar topic. I have started having to get up earlier for work and have been going to bed earlier aswell. Sometimes it takes me a couple of minutes to get up and then I have breakfast and walk to the train. Sometimes I sleep on the train and often when I do so I end up twitching myself awake, often I wake in a start. I know that quite often I have had tennisy dreams and have gone to play a forhand and my muscles have twitched as if I was playing a forehand and that wakes me up. If I am at a stage where muscle twitches are waking me up then does that mean it is time for me to wake up properly? If this is happening to me when I sleep on the train and not in my bed, am I getting the wrong amount of sleep at night?

WildVolley
10-03-2008, 04:49 PM
Neat graphic SystemicAnomaly.

You really want to try to get that 7.5 hrs because I've heard that most growth hormone is released during sleep. In any case, lack of sleep is known to hinder the production of growth hormone.

superman1
10-04-2008, 12:51 AM
At your age I think it's more like 9 hours. If you want optimal growth, then 9-10 hours would be perfect, but obviously that's difficult when they make you wake up at 6:30 AM to get ready for school.

SystemicAnomaly
10-04-2008, 03:12 AM
Note that some sources suggest that 9-10 hours of sleep is optimal for adolescents. This is actually 1 or 2 sleep cycles longer than the 7.5 hours that I suggested previously. This would seem to indicate that 7 to 7.5 should be considered a bare minimum for pre-adults, while 9-10 hours is preferred.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sleep#Hours_by_age (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sleep#Hours_by_age)
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sleep#Optimal_amount_in_humans
(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sleep#Optimal_amount_in_humans)

Neat graphic SystemicAnomaly.

You really want to try to get that 7.5 hrs because I've heard that most growth hormone is released during sleep. In any case, lack of sleep is known to hinder the production of growth hormone.

In case you've not seen the other 2 graphics in the other thread, here is 1 of them:

http://www.hexalsystems.com/nv/images/sleepcycles.gif

You might notice that this is similar yet slightly different from the previous graphic. This graphic show REM, when dreams occur, as a different stage than stage 1. Some other references treats REM as a stage 5 (see the other sleep thread). The graphic in post #6 above basically shows stage 1 occurring in 2 flavors: REM and non-REM.

This 2nd graphic also shows some details not shown in the 1st one. After the 2nd REM, the sleeper briefly enters the awake state -- this might be where lucid dreaming occurs. This also happens after the 3rd and 4th REM (as well as a possible 5th REM). This also suggests that these are the easiest times to wake up.

The largest single release of growth hormone happens during the 1st sleep cycles, probably during stage 3 or 4 of that cycle. Not sure when the next release of GH occurs, but many other important releases and functions also happen as we sleep. Many of these things are related to cell repair, muscle building, creativity, memory/data processing, and rejuvenation of the immune system, nervous system and skeletal system. Adequate sleep also provides for some other known functions as well as functions not yet discovered.

In studying the 2 sleep graphics, it becomes apparent that a full night of sleep is undoubtedly very important. It can be seen that the deeper stages of sleep (stages 3 & 4), occur primarily in the first 5 hours of sleep. An extended stage 3 does not happen until the 3rd cycle -- this appears to be the only prolonged occurrence of stage 3 sleep. Likewise, an extended stage 2 does not happen until the 6th hour (4th cycle) of sleep. It can also happen again during the 5th cycle (about hour 7).

Note that non-REM stage 1 sleep only appears to occur twice during a full night of sleep for an adult. The 1st occurrence looks like a rather brief transition to deeper sleep stages. The 2nd occurrence is somewhat longer, a little bit after 7 hours of sleep. The REM state occurs 4 or 5 times during the night (possibly 6 times for adolescents that sleep for 9+ hours). REM happens for the 1st time after about 2 hours of sleep and becomes more frequent in later sleep cycles.

Many physiological changes are occurring during the various stages of sleep. The established patterns of sleep stages seen in the 2 graphics suggest that these patterns are probably very important for a full night of sleep -- cutting our sleep requirement short, undoubtedly sabotages some important functions of sleep.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sleep#Functions (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sleep#Functions)
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sleep#Physiology (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sleep#Physiology)

.

SystemicAnomaly
10-04-2008, 04:06 AM
This is on a similar topic. I have started having to get up earlier for work and have been going to bed earlier as well. Sometimes it takes me a couple of minutes to get up and then I have breakfast and walk to the train. Sometimes I sleep on the train and often when I do so I end up twitching myself awake, often I wake in a start. I know that quite often I have had tennisy dreams and have gone to play a forhand and my muscles have twitched as if I was playing a forehand and that wakes me up. If I am at a stage where muscle twitches are waking me up then does that mean it is time for me to wake up properly? If this is happening to me when I sleep on the train and not in my bed, am I getting the wrong amount of sleep at night?

:lol: Thirty yrs ago, I used to wake myself up hitting backhands (1-handers).

How many hours of uninterrupted sleep are you getting before breakfast?

bumfluff
10-04-2008, 04:51 AM
Usually go to bed sbout 11.30 and wake up at 6. I don't knwo what time i am getting to sleep though.

SystemicAnomaly
10-05-2008, 01:14 AM
... Sometimes it takes me a couple of minutes to get up and then I have breakfast and walk to the train. Sometimes I sleep on the train and often when I do so I end up twitching myself awake, often I wake in a start. I know that quite often I have had tennisy dreams and have gone to play a forhand and my muscles have twitched as if I was playing a forehand and that wakes me up. If I am at a stage where muscle twitches are waking me up then does that mean it is time for me to wake up properly? If this is happening to me when I sleep on the train and not in my bed, am I getting the wrong amount of sleep at night?

Usually go to bed sbout 11.30 and wake up at 6. I don't knwo what time i am getting to sleep though.

If you cannot get 7 to 7.5 hrs of interrupted sleep, your next best option is to try to get at least 4 full cycles of sleep -- which would put you at somewhere between 6 and 7 hours of uninterrupted sleep (depending own your own individual sleep cycles). It is best to awaken at the end of a sleep cycle, when you are in REM or stage 1 or nearer the wake state.

I'm thinking that if you try to wake up during stage 2 or a deeper stage of sleep, you are more likely to feel groggy and possibly fatigued for much of the day. With that in mind, your next best option is to awaken after 3 full cycles of sleep -- a little more than 5 hours of sleep for many people. This is not really ideal, but it is probably better than trying to wake up in one of the deeper sleep stages. You may miss out on some important stage 2 sleep that you might not get at all on your train nap.

When you wake up for breakfast, do you recall dreaming? If so, then you are most likely waking up during REM. If not, then you may not be hitting the end of a cycle (or you are sleeping a bit too much past a REM). If you are not hitting the end of a cycle, try to set 1 or 2 other alarms that goes off about 20-30 minutes earlier than you primary alarm. The 1st alarm should be one that is fairly gentle (not too loud or annoying). This way, it will not bother you if you happen to be in a deeper stage of sleep.

The twitching that you experience on your train nap is likely an indication that you are in REM or in stage 1 sleep. Stage 1 sleep (including REM) is characterized by occasional muscle twitching. On the train, you may be alternately between REM and non-REM stage 1 or between REM/stage 1 and the wake state. This may actually be somewhat similar to the typical sleep cycles experienced in sleep that happens after 7 hours of uninterrupted sleep.

As I mentioned previously, I am not sure that you are getting any stage 2 (or deeper) sleep during your train nap unless it is a very long nap. If you got much less than 5 hours of sleep before breakfast, it is possible that you may have also missed out on some important stage 3 sleep (that you will probably not be able to make up on the train).
.

SystemicAnomaly
10-05-2008, 02:15 AM
...
You really want to try to get that 7.5 hrs because I've heard that most growth hormone is released during sleep. In any case, lack of sleep is known to hinder the production of growth hormone.

Found another good link that indicates that GH is released during stage 3 and stage 4 sleep. For a ton of good info: 17 Articles & Notes on Sleep and Napping (http://www.centripedal.com/weblog/productivity-life-hacks/articles-and-notes-on-sleep-and-napping)
.

Fedace
10-05-2008, 02:18 AM
4 hours of sleep will do ya. most of the time i survive with 5-6 hours of sleep

phucng_10
10-05-2008, 09:08 AM
The truth is that most hs students don't get enough sleep and they average only 6 hours on school nights and a lot more during non school nights, but they sleep at a much later time on non school nights for obvious reasons. Try to squeeze in at least 7 because it's only 1 hour away from optimal, but it's still better than most students your age.

I'll tell you one thing, friends of mines that are taking AP/IB classes has less then 3 hours of sleep each night because of the pile of homework they're getting every single day. It's a killer and I feel sad for them that they have to stay up so late just to do homework. :? Luckily I'm just going to go to State and take regular classes. 8-)

LuckyR
10-05-2008, 11:10 AM
Just as the title says haha how much sleep should a 15 year old boy get?

Reject one-size-fits-all answers. If you nod off during boring lectures in the afternoon, you need more sleep.

SystemicAnomaly
10-06-2008, 01:24 AM
I'll tell you one thing, friends of mines that are taking AP/IB classes has less then 3 hours of sleep each night because of the pile of homework they're getting every single day. It's a killer and I feel sad for them that they have to stay up so late just to do homework. :? Luckily I'm just going to go to State and take regular classes. 8-)

Is that SJSU, pn? The short semester system there is pretty sweet -- the pace is a bit less hectic than the quarters that I experienced at Cal Poly SLO (many moons ago). Even tho' most of the AP ppl are going to the UCs, Stanford or elsewhere, don't take it too easy at State -- you'll probably still see some decent competition for grades there.