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zapvor
10-07-2008, 01:58 PM
So long story short, I was stringing up a new head ariflow7 with the crossBow in the throat. i get to the end of my mains at 10T and notice that the grommets are popping out easily. so someone else had to hold the grommets in place while i pulled tension. despite doing this, the grommet cut into the frame and actually crushed it a little, leaving a gap outside the grommet in the frame. it's hard to describe. so what do i do in this situation? i am in the process of sending it back for a replacement because i think the frame is defective. the design of these new crossbows arent the best...

nickb
10-07-2008, 02:09 PM
I sort of get what you mean. Sounds like something wrong with the frame. I would send it back to head. I hate stringing gimmick rackets :neutral:

sruckauf
10-07-2008, 03:35 PM
I second nickb's comment. I have seen a lot of frames do that in the uber-power racquet category. I've never seen a player racquet do that, or a tweener type. It's usually that fat frame type racquet.

I say send it back.. just poor racquet design.

Headshotterer
10-07-2008, 03:38 PM
pics?
yes e need pics

tennisfreak15347
10-07-2008, 03:46 PM
why are crossbow racquets so expensive? I don't think too many people would buy them.

Bad Dog
10-07-2008, 04:24 PM
I sort of get what you mean. Sounds like something wrong with the frame. I would send it back to head. I hate stringing gimmick rackets :neutral:

I second nickb's comment. I have seen a lot of frames do that in the uber-power racquet category. I've never seen a player racquet do that, or a tweener type. It's usually that fat frame type racquet.

I say send it back.. just poor racquet design.


Zapvor Ė Donít worry about it; these things happen. Your client would be quite impressed if you take the initiative to call Headís customer service, and arrange for them to step in. Also mention to them that you are a very loyal Head tennis player with your own personal collection of seven Prestige racquets (these are the facts), so you are trying to help Head maintain a positive image among consumers.

So donít feel bad, youíll be fine. :)

zapvor
10-07-2008, 07:27 PM
thanks for the response gentlemen. yea the frame was super flexy. the thing is huge-118sq in? and it requires a special adapter to string, for those who haven's strung one yet. unfortunately i didnt take a pic. basically, the force from the tension allowed the grommet to enlarge the hole in teh frame so much so that you can see a space! the tension recommendation for the racket is 51-57lbs too.

Stan
10-08-2008, 02:20 AM
What kind of machine do you have? Did you follow Head's special stringing instructions for this frame? Did you even know Head had special instructions??? If not, then the fault for this clearly lies in the hand of the stringer. If so, then the fault may be that of a defective frame. Based on the scarce information provided I would lean toward the former.

McLovin
10-08-2008, 02:45 AM
Did you follow Head's special stringing instructions for this frame? Did you even know Head had special instructions??? If not, then the fault for this clearly lies in the hand of the stringer.
I'm guessing that if he knew "it requires a special adapter to string" that he (1) knew Head had special instructions and (2) followed Head them.

barry
10-08-2008, 04:35 AM
Personally I think it is a Head design issue, and dealing with Head's customer service is a joke. I stopped recommending Head products, due to the many problems club players are having with their equipment.
Even if you follow Head's special instructions on stringing, CS gives you a hard time when you ask for a replacement. Best bet, promote other company products (Wilson, Babolat, Prince, etc.) and warn your customers about the down falls of using Head products. Most of the time you get stuck.

Even the Penn tennis balls (owned by Head) have taken a down turn. Head used to be one of the premiere racket manufactures in the world, now it is at the bottom of my list.

zapvor
10-08-2008, 07:07 AM
I'm guessing that if he knew "it requires a special adapter to string" that he (1) knew Head had special instructions and (2) followed Head them.

yea....thanks for the redundancy. the other guy must have just skimmed my post.

TW Staff
10-08-2008, 07:37 AM
So long story short, I was stringing up a new head ariflow7 with the crossBow in the throat. i get to the end of my mains at 10T and notice that the grommets are popping out easily. so someone else had to hold the grommets in place while i pulled tension. despite doing this, the grommet cut into the frame and actually crushed it a little, leaving a gap outside the grommet in the frame. it's hard to describe. so what do i do in this situation? i am in the process of sending it back for a replacement because i think the frame is defective. the design of these new crossbows arent the best...

There are a couple stringing techniques that you can perform to keep your grommets in your racquet. One technique, you have described. You must hold your finger on the grommet in question before pulling tension for security reasons. If your finger is not strong enough to keep the grommet in place, I would get some needle nose pliers and squeeze them to form a point. Once the needle nose pliers are squeezed, push the point of the pliers on the grommet next to the string that is exiting the grommet and pull tension. Only pull tension if you know that the grommet is not coming out of the racquet. If the grommet comes out of the racquet, the string can get defected by the frame or the string can cut into your graphite. It's a hard technique to describe. If your racquet is defected, hopefully Head can replace it for you. Head is usually good, when considering defective racquet replacements. Good luck.

Danny, TW

scotus
10-08-2008, 08:37 AM
Something similar happened to my ProKennex 7G, except it wasn't during stringing.

I don't know whether it happened when the string popped during the match, or when I cut out the strings after the match.

But I found that the string had cut through though the grommet and cracked both the outside and the inside of the frame at around 2 o'clock.

Fortunately my frame was still under warranty, so I was able to get a replacement.

But it was my first time experiencing this in my 20 years of playing.

bsandy
10-08-2008, 01:50 PM
There are a couple stringing techniques that you can perform to keep your grommets in your racquet. One technique, you have described. You must hold your finger on the grommet in question before pulling tension for security reasons. If your finger is not strong enough to keep the grommet in place, I would get some needle nose pliers and squeeze them to form a point. Once the needle nose pliers are squeezed, push the point of the pliers on the grommet next to the string that is exiting the grommet and pull tension. Only pull tension if you know that the grommet is not coming out of the racquet. If the grommet comes out of the racquet, the string can get defected by the frame or the string can cut into your graphite. It's a hard technique to describe. If your racquet is defected, hopefully Head can replace it for you. Head is usually good, when considering defective racquet replacements. Good luck.

Danny, TW

Wow . . .

When this happened to me on a Yonex, TW called it a Stringer's error.

. . . Bud

stringwalla
10-10-2008, 05:06 AM
When we first received these racquets as demos, the rep never gave us the "heads up" on the stringing requirements. We did one on a 6pt machine and crushed a dent at 12 o'clock 'cause we didn't know about the adapter. Then we did one on a 2pt machine and couldn't keep the crossbow from popping out near completion due to head shape contortion.

Head really dropped the ball on this design. You need a good 6pt machine along with the 12 o'clock adapter to string properly. Or to complete a couple of bottom X's before you start the top X's on a 2pt machine.

No doubt they'll be getting a lot of damaged returns from inexperienced stringers-

zapvor
10-12-2008, 09:49 AM
There are a couple stringing techniques that you can perform to keep your grommets in your racquet. One technique, you have described. You must hold your finger on the grommet in question before pulling tension for security reasons. If your finger is not strong enough to keep the grommet in place, I would get some needle nose pliers and squeeze them to form a point. Once the needle nose pliers are squeezed, push the point of the pliers on the grommet next to the string that is exiting the grommet and pull tension. Only pull tension if you know that the grommet is not coming out of the racquet. If the grommet comes out of the racquet, the string can get defected by the frame or the string can cut into your graphite. It's a hard technique to describe. If your racquet is defected, hopefully Head can replace it for you. Head is usually good, when considering defective racquet replacements. Good luck.

Danny, TW

thanks for the detailed response. thats what we tried to do to no success.

zapvor
10-12-2008, 09:51 AM
When we first received these racquets as demos, the rep never gave us the "heads up" on the stringing requirements. We did one on a 6pt machine and crushed a dent at 12 o'clock 'cause we didn't know about the adapter. Then we did one on a 2pt machine and couldn't keep the crossbow from popping out near completion due to head shape contortion.

Head really dropped the ball on this design. You need a good 6pt machine along with the 12 o'clock adapter to string properly. Or to complete a couple of bottom X's before you start the top X's on a 2pt machine.

No doubt they'll be getting a lot of damaged returns from inexperienced stringers-

yikes! they didnt tell you? on our end they just gave us instructions on paper, and not much else. however, you had to notice the adapter that came with every new racket right? but yea Head can be more explicit and clear about it. i wont be surprised if they get a lot of damaged rackets. bad design!