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View Full Version : credit to low power racquet for improving my game !!! Long Live the Mid!!!


phoenicks
11-02-2008, 04:00 AM
All along, my stroke has been very lack of pace and spin, but I am stubborn, very stubborn, still stick to small headed, low power players stick( KBT ) as a result, my stroke a lot of times really sits up and scream: Whack me !!!!! But still, I stick to it, because it's very very honest to me, it gives me feedback as to whether or not I am hitting with good technique.

Some of my hitting partner in the club change to powerful racquet ( nanny or babolat stick ), then they really saw an improve in pace and spin. Man, they can just hit a powerful shot at will with those louzy S H I T technique.

After seeing how the stick elevated their power level, I was really tempted to change, even they also asked me to change, but still I refuse to convert to the dark side, no way i am gonna borrow power from a piece of stick, it's gotta be my technique. ( lack of )

at the same time, I saw another korean young kid ( around 10 years old ) using LM rad tour mid+, I was even more determined to stick to my racquet. ( p/s : I was still using KBT that time )

At last, I've been taking a lesson from a great coach, who really transform my stroke. At last, I am able to generate and summon pace & spin at will.

Okay, all I want to say is, only wimp who can't generate power and don't have technique use nanny stick. you can even start out with player stick if you are having a teaching pro for lesson. After all, it's all about technique and racquet head speed.

Long live Midsize and low power racquet !!!!!

Satch
11-02-2008, 04:05 AM
^+1

10char

nickarnold2000
11-02-2008, 03:11 PM
So, the solution is to have good technique and also use a 100" frame.

nCode747
11-02-2008, 07:53 PM
If you are sacraficing your game in order to look cool with a low powered mid, you are just plain foolish. If you have good spin technique a higher powered frame will be to your advantage.

VGP
11-02-2008, 08:09 PM
Bottom line, are you winning or losing?

orangettecoleman
11-02-2008, 08:31 PM
all your baseliners are belong to us.

strahan918
11-02-2008, 08:37 PM
all your baseliners are belong to us.

omg, LOL. nice call.

phoenicks
11-02-2008, 10:37 PM
If you are sacraficing your game in order to look cool with a low powered mid, you are just plain foolish. If you have good spin technique a higher powered frame will be to your advantage.

I am not trying to look cool, have u read my post??? In fact I said: But still, I stick to it, because it's very very honest to me, it gives me feedback as to whether or not I am hitting with good technique.

I agree with you that with good technique, high power frame will be even more advantageous, but I can generate my own power and spin now, why should I borrow cheapp power from the frame???

phoenicks
11-02-2008, 10:46 PM
Bottom line, are you winning or losing?

I am neither winning nor losing here, I am in the process of acquiring and fine tuning my technique, devepoing solid stroke and making it consistent, I don't give a heck about the match, I play very few matches recently, I prefer rallying, as I hit fewer bar balls in matches, far fewer. Once everything is down, I will go on to play match often.

In fact, there's another Korean dad with his kids and another 1 of his adult trainee around my court, they did a lot of drills and rallying and seldom play matches, and you know what, I am sure he ( even the kid ) can crush a lot of the people on board here.

origmarm
11-03-2008, 02:47 AM
all your baseliners are belong to us.

Absolute genius!

adso1973
11-03-2008, 03:30 AM
Hi Phoenix!

I also play with a low powered racquet, the Rqis 1 tour, it's not a mid, but it's low powered indeed. When playing with my coach (also an ex pro) who improved my technique a lot, it feels great. When playing with heavy hitters from the baseline it's great.. but when playing long rallies with younger players (I'm 35) I can sense that I start to loose power as the time pass.. Yesterday I played in a tournament with a 23 y old guy("those bloody young *******s with no respect!!"). Not as good technique as mine, but a pusher..
I loose 62 57 46 (2hs 30 min match on clay).. The reason I got tired, in the 1st set I could hit as many winners as I wanted and my serve was untouchable, in the 3rd I had to start a defensive play as my shots started landing short and I could barely win my serve.. I know that getting in shape would make things easier (I run 8 km 3 times a week + 1.5hr of tennis 3 times a week) but I'm considering on getting a powered racquet and see how it goes.. the goal is to play better every day, enjoy playing and win! :)

TonyB
11-03-2008, 03:36 AM
all your baseliners are belong to us.


Brilliant.

smirker
11-03-2008, 04:11 AM
Brilliant.

inspired I'd say

phoenicks
11-03-2008, 08:26 AM
Hi Phoenix!

I also play with a low powered racquet, the Rqis 1 tour, it's not a mid, but it's low powered indeed. When playing with my coach (also an ex pro) who improved my technique a lot, it feels great. When playing with heavy hitters from the baseline it's great.. but when playing long rallies with younger players (I'm 35) I can sense that I start to loose power as the time pass.. Yesterday I played in a tournament with a 23 y old guy("those bloody young *******s with no respect!!"). Not as good technique as mine, but a pusher..
I loose 62 57 46 (2hs 30 min match on clay).. The reason I got tired, in the 1st set I could hit as many winners as I wanted and my serve was untouchable, in the 3rd I had to start a defensive play as my shots started landing short and I could barely win my serve.. I know that getting in shape would make things easier (I run 8 km 3 times a week + 1.5hr of tennis 3 times a week) but I'm considering on getting a powered racquet and see how it goes.. the goal is to play better every day, enjoy playing and win! :)

Hi there,

off topic here, I definitely like the Yonex RQis 1 tour racquet, you know, sometimes I also get the disease of keep raving about how good it is and swearing by it after using it. ( is that why you still haven't changed racquet??? ) But it sure is a very low power stick, you have to take a huge fast cut just to manage to get a decent ball.

yeah, those pusher are surely a pain to play with, you know I actually played my first official match with a pusher ( although not a very skillful 1, but still can run pretty fast and get to every shot you hit them ), I was gonna give give up at 1 point in the match, but still hang on tight, at last justice finally prevailed and gain the victory.....

You run or you sprint??? As I have read a lot of article which states that running doesn't help a lot, but if you coupled running with sprint, then it's okay. And, I think weightlifting does help a lot to build your endurance, because as the match goes longer, both your lower and upper body will start to fatigue and feel the strain of wielding a heavy stick. MY coach is the best testament to this as he really have very defined muscle all over his body, and he can swing just as hard and just as long as anyone out there, no joke !!!

But, still I admit getting a high power racquet is a better quick fix solution as 35 year old man have a lot of dedication and can't squeeze out too much time for tennis. And sometimes, some of us really need some extra help to put those young arrogant c0cksters in their place and teach them a lesson:) !!!

phoenicks
11-03-2008, 10:21 AM
Basically, anyone who's facing the same prob as mine before or are using a mid and are thrilled at it or are kinda struggling to keep up can share their stories here as well !!! and I actually think that beginner should use a low power racquet, not necessarily a mid, can be a midplus or slightly oversized ( as long as smaller than 105' ) to force them to be discipline with their stroke and hit the sweetpot, nailing the sweetpot is too imprtant to be ignored by any1 who start playing tennis !!!

TonyB
11-03-2008, 02:10 PM
all your baseliners are belong to us.


The more I think about it, this post deserves recognition on this forum as Post of the Year.

What do y'all think?

topspin92
11-03-2008, 02:21 PM
The mids are usually weighted higher, so with proper technique, they should be able to generate just as much pace as a mid +. Federer and Sampras are good examples of that one. Also, I find that mids are better and angled and touch shots that the mid + racquets. More overall capability, but not enough margin for error. That's why they are called PLAYER'S racquets.

ag200boy
11-03-2008, 02:54 PM
all your baseliners are belong to us.

i dont get it, anyone care to explain?

it seems hilarious....

haerdalis
11-03-2008, 03:03 PM
change baseliners for bases and google it. But I agree the comment is great!

tata
11-03-2008, 03:13 PM
Technique and skill is always important but i still dont think you should be as stubborn.You may stay true to your midsize frames but the people you play will not hold back on switching to a frame that can give them an advantage in a match.If you are winning and happy with your stick then thats great but if you arent then its time to move on with the times because i find it stupid to play tennis just to stay true to your stick instead of playing to win.In the end it all comes down to players preference i guess.The important thing is that your happy with it and its getting you somewhere.

jmverdugo
11-03-2008, 03:40 PM
Good for you, but let me tell you something...

Most tennis players (including pros) use the stick they use because it is what helps them to WIN. They do not use them because they like the challenge or to improve their technique.
Using a "player racket" alone doesnt warranty you good technique the only reason your technique may have improved is because you have a coach.
People is asking about if you are winnig because the only way to find out if your technique is good enough to use a given racket is playing matches.
Obviously you are free to use whatever you want to use but so is other people, my point is you shouldnt judge them for using a "granny" racket because you could be judge too for using a "Player Racket".

iTennis
11-03-2008, 04:29 PM
It's good that you focus on improving your technique rather than blaming on equipments.

Then again, you would get to a point to consider the most optimal stick to squeeze your best game in the match play, more and more you understand your ability and care to win the match.

Or I guess some people are just happy with seeing them on the mirror holding the holly stick. And these posers usually think it's more important to hit huge forehand winners or no touch aces on serve in the match as they dream of, rather than trying to win the match using their brain as much as their physical skills and abilities.

Light, oversized, powerful stick can be a player's stick, if the user takes full advantages of it to enhance his/ her game and win the match...that's the real player to me, regardless the skill level.

tata
11-03-2008, 04:33 PM
Not that there is anything wrong with hitting huge forehands and aces though.If you have an advantage over your opponent at something then that becomes your means of attack.To become stubborn about winning with style is no different to the thread creator and his obession about using a certain stick because he doesnt want to be seen as depending on the racquet.

phoenicks
11-03-2008, 04:42 PM
Good for you, but let me tell you something...

Most tennis players (including pros) use the stick they use because it is what helps them to WIN. They do not use them because they like the challenge or to improve their technique.
Using a "player racket" alone doesnt warranty you good technique the only reason your technique may have improved is because you have a coach.
People is asking about if you are winnig because the only way to find out if your technique is good enough to use a given racket is playing matches.
Obviously you are free to use whatever you want to use but so is other people, my point is you shouldnt judge them for using a "granny" racket because you could be judge too for using a "Player Racket".

look, I am not judging anyone by their granny racquet, in fact most of the people around me don't know a jack about racquet, so there really is no point using player racquet to look cool as some posters pointed out here, LOL:).

and yes, using player racquet obviously doesn't let you magically acquire technique overnight ( or else, player racquet will be the best selling racquet, and no 1 will bother buyuing a granny stick ). But it will tell you straight in your face that you sucks if your technique is not correct, it's like the most honest thing on court other than the tennis ball !

Il Mostro
11-03-2008, 04:47 PM
all your baseliners are belong to us.

What u say? ;-)

iTennis
11-03-2008, 04:52 PM
I did not mean hitting huge winners is bad at all...... my point was going over one's head, either with a stick that does not help one play his/ her 100% game or with trying for winners no matter what, is equally pointless to me....you know.

TonyB
11-03-2008, 04:52 PM
There are 60+ year old guys at my club using granny racquets (huge widebodies at 110+ sq. in.) who would mop the floor with every 4.5 level player in the area.

It really isn't about the racquet that you use, it's about how you use it. Sure, these granddads aren't going to pound topspin winners to the corners, but they'll slice and dice you to death. It gets so frustrating that your mental game starts to go down the toilet as well. You start to overhit, you miss more shots, and they just end up beating you faster.

I'm glad you found a racquet that you can play with, but it's not the size or the weight. It's all about how the racquet matches your technique, style of play, and your physical makeup.

I play with heavier and smaller frames than anyone else I know. But that doesn't make me a better player. If I tried to switch to their lightweight oversized racquets, my game would go down the tubes. And they would never be able to play with my 12.5+ ounce frames, either. What matters is what YOU feel comfortable with, not what anyone else feels comfortable with.

phoenicks
11-03-2008, 05:04 PM
There are 60+ year old guys at my club using granny racquets (huge widebodies at 110+ sq. in.) who would mop the floor with every 4.5 level player in the area.

It really isn't about the racquet that you use, it's about how you use it. Sure, these granddads aren't going to pound topspin winners to the corners, but they'll slice and dice you to death. It gets so frustrating that your mental game starts to go down the toilet as well. You start to overhit, you miss more shots, and they just end up beating you faster.

I'm glad you found a racquet that you can play with, but it's not the size or the weight. It's all about how the racquet matches your technique, style of play, and your physical makeup.

I play with heavier and smaller frames than anyone else I know. But that doesn't make me a better player. If I tried to switch to their lightweight oversized racquets, my game would go down the tubes. And they would never be able to play with my 12.5+ ounce frames, either. What matters is what YOU feel comfortable with, not what anyone else feels comfortable with.

you just nail it here in the last paragraph it's all about how comfortable you feel.

the Town Sherif
11-03-2008, 05:07 PM
All along, my stroke has been very lack of pace and spin, but I am stubborn, very stubborn, still stick to small headed, low power players stick( KBT ) as a result, my stroke a lot of times really sits up and scream: Whack me !!!!! But still, I stick to it, because it's very very honest to me, it gives me feedback as to whether or not I am hitting with good technique.

Some of my hitting partner in the club change to powerful racquet ( nanny or babolat stick ), then they really saw an improve in pace and spin. Man, they can just hit a powerful shot at will with those louzy S H I T technique.

After seeing how the stick elevated their power level, I was really tempted to change, even they also asked me to change, but still I refuse to convert to the dark side, no way i am gonna borrow power from a piece of stick, it's gotta be my technique. ( lack of )

at the same time, I saw another korean young kid ( around 10 years old ) using LM rad tour mid+, I was even more determined to stick to my racquet. ( p/s : I was still using KBT that time )

At last, I've been taking a lesson from a great coach, who really transform my stroke. At last, I am able to generate and summon pace & spin at will.

Okay, all I want to say is, only wimp who can't generate power and don't have technique use nanny stick. you can even start out with player stick if you are having a teaching pro for lesson. After all, it's all about technique and racquet head speed.

Long live Midsize and low power racquet !!!!!



Wow...

getting through that was painful reading

jmverdugo
11-03-2008, 05:19 PM
look, I am not judging anyone by their granny racquet, in fact most of the people around me don't know a jack about racquet, so there really is no point using player racquet to look cool as some posters pointed out here, LOL:).

and yes, using player racquet obviously doesn't let you magically acquire technique overnight ( or else, player racquet will be the best selling racquet, and no 1 will bother buyuing a granny stick ). But it will tell you straight in your face that you sucks if your technique is not correct, it's like the most honest thing on court other than the tennis ball !

I would like to know if there is really a "correct technique". What is nowdays known as "correct technique" is just only what help you to win without hurting you (and sometimes not even that). No so long ago there were other "correct techniques". Be sure that you will face the feared "pusher" player and he will defeat you, more than one time, yes you will be defeated by a guy with a granny racket that doesnt use the "correct technique".

After all there is no mention of how to hit the ball on the rules of tennis.

iTennis
11-03-2008, 05:19 PM
There are 60+ year old guys at my club using granny racquets (huge widebodies at 110+ sq. in.) who would mop the floor with every 4.5 level player in the area.

It really isn't about the racquet that you use, it's about how you use it. Sure, these granddads aren't going to pound topspin winners to the corners, but they'll slice and dice you to death. It gets so frustrating that your mental game starts to go down the toilet as well. You start to overhit, you miss more shots, and they just end up beating you faster.

I'm glad you found a racquet that you can play with, but it's not the size or the weight. It's all about how the racquet matches your technique, style of play, and your physical makeup.

I play with heavier and smaller frames than anyone else I know. But that doesn't make me a better player. If I tried to switch to their lightweight oversized racquets, my game would go down the tubes. And they would never be able to play with my 12.5+ ounce frames, either. What matters is what YOU feel comfortable with, not what anyone else feels comfortable with.


Right on...those 'seasoned' players with big sticks often prove a point. They are more experienced rather than just older, knowing exactly what they want and how they get it. They know and live with who they are, and their stick selection as well as their game plan makes much more sense than those youngsters with wanna-be sticks and styles.

iTennis
11-03-2008, 05:51 PM
I would like to know if there is really a "correct technique". What is nowdays known as "correct technique" is just only what help you to win without hurting you (and sometimes not even that). No so long ago there were other "correct techniques". Be sure that you will face the feared "pusher" player and he will defeat you, more than one time, yes you will be defeated by a guy with a granny racket that doesnt use the "correct technique".

After all there is no mention of how to hit the ball on the rules of tennis.

OP's point would be just that a player's racquet exposes your imperfections more so you could be aware of need for further skill improvement, rather than literally checking for correct technique. I could carry my T2000 in my bag for skill check once in a while, but what would that really mean to me playing with a 100in2 graphite stick? Nothing. Your skill can be measured with whatever the stick works best for you, and nothing is more black and white than playing a match.

greg280
11-03-2008, 05:59 PM
hi, i am 44 years old, about strong 4.5-5.0 hard hitter. i can hit with a head prestige pro... 12.7 oz., with a ton more pace than say, a bab. pure storm tour at say, 12.2 oz. now, one is a players frame and other is kind of a power and control frame. so, why can i hit harder with the prestige pro????? an infamous low powered players frame? simple physics.. i can swing the 12.7 oz. pp pro as fast as i can swing the 12.2 oz supposedly more powerful babolat, more mass at same speed means more pace.

phoenicks
11-03-2008, 06:06 PM
OP's point would be just that a player's racquet exposes your imperfections more so you could be aware of need for further skill improvement, rather than literally checking for correct technique. I could carry my T2000 in my bag for skill check once in a while, but what would that really mean to me playing with a 100in2 graphite stick? Nothing. Your skill can be measured with whatever the stick works best for you, and nothing is more black and white than playing a match.

u nail it there, and I agree, nothing is clearer than playing a match.

phoenicks
11-03-2008, 06:09 PM
I would like to know if there is really a "correct technique". What is nowdays known as "correct technique" is just only what help you to win without hurting you (and sometimes not even that). No so long ago there were other "correct techniques". Be sure that you will face the feared "pusher" player and he will defeat you, more than one time, yes you will be defeated by a guy with a granny racket that doesnt use the "correct technique".

After all there is no mention of how to hit the ball on the rules of tennis.

of course I didn't literally mean there really is a correct technique, the one and only correct technique towards play good tennis. What I mean here is good technique that help you play at a higher level.

phoenicks
11-03-2008, 06:11 PM
Wow...

getting through that was painful reading

well, imagine getting thorugh my process, is even more painful, LOL:twisted:

tennis is no easy game:)

teppeiahn1
11-03-2008, 06:32 PM
Your making the racquet power difference sound like you are comparing sun and earth.

phoenicks
11-04-2008, 01:28 AM
Your making the racquet power difference sound like you are comparing sun and earth.

I don't really get what you are trying to say, can elaborate more???

BreakPoint
11-04-2008, 01:48 AM
change baseliners for bases and google it. But I agree the comment is great!
No wonder I didn't get it. I don't waste my time playing video games. I just waste my time on this board. :shock:

teppeiahn1
11-04-2008, 06:02 AM
I don't really get what you are trying to say, can elaborate more???

Im saying using pdr and using Mg prestige mid both offer alot of power.
The pdr will offer a little more though. Not a drastic change.

MichaelChang
11-04-2008, 06:05 AM
look, I am not judging anyone by their granny racquet, in fact most of the people around me don't know a jack about racquet, so there really is no point using player racquet to look cool as some posters pointed out here, LOL:).

and yes, using player racquet obviously doesn't let you magically acquire technique overnight ( or else, player racquet will be the best selling racquet, and no 1 will bother buyuing a granny stick ). But it will tell you straight in your face that you sucks if your technique is not correct, it's like the most honest thing on court other than the tennis ball !

to the OP, you sound like you know more than most other people already. then why bother here?

nickarnold2000
11-04-2008, 06:45 AM
hi, i am 44 years old, about strong 4.5-5.0 hard hitter. i can hit with a head prestige pro... 12.7 oz., with a ton more pace than say, a bab. pure storm tour at say, 12.2 oz. now, one is a players frame and other is kind of a power and control frame. so, why can i hit harder with the prestige pro????? an infamous low powered players frame? simple physics.. i can swing the 12.7 oz. pp pro as fast as i can swing the 12.2 oz supposedly more powerful babolat, more mass at same speed means more pace.
I'm about the same age as you, play at the 5.0 - 5.5 level and used to use a players stick(RDS 90). I agree with you on the mass part generating more velocity assuming you can get the same racket head speed going. My problem were the shots when I didn't have time to set up properly ie out wide BHs Fhs. With the rds, i could often only get back a weak response which would get hammered for a winner. With my 100" tweener(although weighted up to 342g - is this a players frame weight?) it's not a weakness anymore; with the extra frame power I can get the ball back deeper. I could probably get away with using the 90" 60%-70% of the time but with the top guys, forget it.

BreakPoint
11-04-2008, 11:19 AM
I'm about the same age as you, play at the 5.0 - 5.5 level and used to use a players stick(RDS 90). I agree with you on the mass part generating more velocity assuming you can get the same racket head speed going. My problem were the shots when I didn't have time to set up properly ie out wide BHs Fhs. With the rds, i could often only get back a weak response which would get hammered for a winner. With my 100" tweener(although weighted up to 342g - is this a players frame weight?) it's not a weakness anymore; with the extra frame power I can get the ball back deeper. I could probably get away with using the 90" 60%-70% of the time but with the top guys, forget it.
Interesting because I find when I play against better players that hit the ball really hard, I do much better with a heavier racquet than with a lighter racquet, regardless of headsize, to defend against their big heavy shots. With a lighter racquet, I can feel like my opponent is knocking my racquet out of my hands. But with a heavier racquet, it's much more stable and I feel I can use the weight of the racquet to return the heavy momentum of the incoming ball, even when I don't take much of a swing and just block the ball.

basil J
11-04-2008, 01:19 PM
I agree with BP. I prefer a heavier stick against better players for the same reasons he stated.

nickarnold2000
11-05-2008, 06:02 AM
Interesting because I find when I play against better players that hit the ball really hard, I do much better with a heavier racquet than with a lighter racquet, regardless of headsize, to defend against their big heavy shots. With a lighter racquet, I can feel like my opponent is knocking my racquet out of my hands. But with a heavier racquet, it's much more stable and I feel I can use the weight of the racquet to return the heavy momentum of the incoming ball, even when I don't take much of a swing and just block the ball.
I think the weight of my rackets(342g - not sure how HL however) cuts a fine line between weight and ease of movement ie. fast racket head speed. On a casual Sunday afternoon hitting with friends, I could easily play with a mid but when it gets serious, out comes the leaded up tweener. It seems to work for me.

Jack & Coke
11-05-2008, 07:51 AM
all your baseliners are belong to us.

lol

for reference:

http://www.allyourbasearebelongtous.com/gif/allyourbase.gif

Winners or Errors
11-08-2008, 08:57 AM
I'm about the same age as you, play at the 5.0 - 5.5 level and used to use a players stick(RDS 90). I agree with you on the mass part generating more velocity assuming you can get the same racket head speed going. My problem were the shots when I didn't have time to set up properly ie out wide BHs Fhs. With the rds, i could often only get back a weak response which would get hammered for a winner. With my 100" tweener(although weighted up to 342g - is this a players frame weight?) it's not a weakness anymore; with the extra frame power I can get the ball back deeper. I could probably get away with using the 90" 60%-70% of the time but with the top guys, forget it.

I'm in that age group as well, and just getting back into tennis after a long time away from the sport. Bought a pair of midplus racquets that are lighter than my old sticks, and think the transition will ultimately help, but I am finding that the issue for me is not so much the fact that the heavier racquet tires me out quicker (that's true...), but that I am more prone to hurting myself (elbow/shoulder) with the lighter newer racquet.

Thankfully, being a 4.0 player, I don't typically run into the same guys you do on the court. I just regripped my old mids, and am going to give them a shot.

nickarnold2000
11-08-2008, 09:59 PM
I'm in that age group as well, and just getting back into tennis after a long time away from the sport. Bought a pair of midplus racquets that are lighter than my old sticks, and think the transition will ultimately help, but I am finding that the issue for me is not so much the fact that the heavier racquet tires me out quicker (that's true...), but that I am more prone to hurting myself (elbow/shoulder) with the lighter newer racquet.

Thankfully, being a 4.0 player, I don't typically run into the same guys you do on the court. I just regripped my old mids, and am going to give them a shot.
Well whatever works. Maybe using heavier but more head light mid plus frames is the answer. An easy way to experiment on court with weighting is using ducktape with different amounts of lead tape prepped first at home. On court, I can quickly move the lead around from 3-9, the throat, or on the grip by attaching with tape.
The saying, " use the heaviest racket you're comfortable with playing" is a good guideline I think.

ronalditop
11-09-2008, 07:23 AM
people always say that technique is more important than a good racquet. i think is 50-50. for example, when my racquethave the exact gripsize and weight i like, i can play very good, and i can beat people who has better ranking than me. but if my gripsize is just a little bigger or smaller, or the racquet´s weight change, i can lose against almost anybody, like last time when i lose 3 sets against a 50 old pusher. that happened because my gripsize had increise a little cause i had changed my old OG for a new one and i didnt stretch it far enough so i coudn´t generate good racquet speed and i was hitting a lot of balls long.

blue12
11-09-2008, 08:00 AM
ed landing short and I could barely win my serve.. I know that getting in shape would make things easier (I run 8 km 3 times a week + 1.5hr of tennis 3 times a week) but I'm considering on getting a powered racquet and see how it goes.. the goal is to play better every day, enjoy playing and win! :)[/QUOTE]

Why not switch to a more powerful racket in the third set.
Since you are already tired the more powerful racket would seam more controlled.

yellowoctopus
11-10-2008, 01:41 PM
...and I actually think that beginner should use a low power racquet, not necessarily a mid, can be a midplus or slightly oversized ( as long as smaller than 105' ) to force them to be discipline with their stroke and hit the sweetpot, nailing the sweetpot is too imprtant to be ignored by any1 who start playing tennis !!!


hear hear....I second that.