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View Full Version : Wilson Hyper Prostaff 6.1 95 or Babolat Pure Drive Roddick


Mdubb23
11-06-2008, 07:23 PM
Hi--I'm a thirteen-year-old junior, and I hit with a full-western forehand and I love to come to the net. Pretty much since it first came out (2.5-3 years ago) I have been playing with the Pure Drive Cortex (a bit of lead in the throat) and,more recently, (past 3 or 4 months) or so have been hitting with the Pure Control, which is becoming increasingly harder to find. I really can't decide to go for a player-tweener stick or a pure tweener stick, so I have narrowed it down to one in each category. My dad plays with the Wilson HPS 6.1 and I just love the rock-solid feel it provides. I have tried the N6.1 and K6.1 and just really prefer the feel of the HPS for whatever reason. However, I really also like the Pure Drive Roddick. It is everything my Pure Drives were and more. Any thoughts of which way I should go would be much appreciated. Thanks in advance!

meowmix
11-06-2008, 07:45 PM
IMO, the PDR is essentially a leaded up PD. Try leading up your pure drive to the specs of the PDR and see how that plays.

Mdubb23
11-06-2008, 07:57 PM
Ok, thanks, Meowmix, will do. Any information or opinions on the HPS 6.1?

nickarnold2000
11-06-2008, 08:38 PM
I used to use the HPS 6.1 and compared to the PDR it has way less power. It all depends on what you want from a racket.

Nanshiki
11-06-2008, 09:03 PM
If you're a junior, you should play with racquets you can still buy new. You won't be able to find consistent racquets if you become a serious player because you'll only be able to get used ones (in god knows what grip sizes), at least not until your a pro and they'll be able to slap some racquets together out of the old molds...

Mdubb23
11-07-2008, 03:06 PM
If you're a junior, you should play with racquets you can still buy new. You won't be able to find consistent racquets if you become a serious player because you'll only be able to get used ones (in god knows what grip sizes), at least not until your a pro and they'll be able to slap some racquets together out of the old molds...

R A C Q U E T B R O K E R . C O M has every old racquet new imaginable.

Ross K
11-08-2008, 02:12 AM
Hi Mdubb,

Well, I'm familiar with EU version HPS 6.1 (which is a bit different to the US model, I believe), and the PDR also.

My biggest impressions are that the HPS has great maneuverability (aided by the pronounced head-light balance) and you can retrieve, chase down and rally all day long with it. Also, it's an absolute topspin machine! I remember it was a lot of fun because the ball just doesn't go out basically! Anyway, it's def a rod that helps keep you in points longer.

On a more negative note, I also recall that, despite a certain stiffness, serves were a little lacking in power, ditto groundies (although this could entirely be to do with the particular string job that was on it.) I might also add that around the time I checked it out, I was very familiar with the PSC 6.1, against which the HPS appeared to be much less of a ball-crushing monster! Then the biggest issue I recall was the harsh after-effects on my arm (again though, string set up might have been the cause.) Generally speaking however Mdubb, I must confess, I did like this frame a lot and wonder how effective it might be with an informed string and tension choice.

As re the PDR, the fact it's fun to play with is maybe the only thing it shares with the HPS (Eu)... Where as the HPS is easy to swing, the PDR isn't as far as I'm concerned (it has a particular balance and specifically weighted hoop area I think that isn't for me), and is altogether somewhat lacking in the maneuverability stakes. It also hugely more powerful. Lacks touch and feel in comparison. And is more muted than the HPS... not that this makes it a bad frame of course. (Far, far from it.) Just a rather different frame... IMO...

R.

Mdubb23
11-09-2008, 03:13 PM
Hi Mdubb,

Well, I'm familiar with EU version HPS 6.1 (which is a bit different to the US model, I believe), and the PDR also.

My biggest impressions are that the HPS has great maneuverability (aided by the pronounced head-light balance) and you can retrieve, chase down and rally all day long with it. Also, it's an absolute topspin machine! I remember it was a lot of fun because the ball just doesn't go out basically! Anyway, it's def a rod that helps keep you in points longer.

On a more negative note, I also recall that, despite a certain stiffness, serves were a little lacking in power, ditto groundies (although this could entirely be to do with the particular string job that was on it.) I might also add that around the time I checked it out, I was very familiar with the PSC 6.1, against which the HPS appeared to be much less of a ball-crushing monster! Then the biggest issue I recall was the harsh after-effects on my arm (again though, string set up might have been the cause.) Generally speaking however Mdubb, I must confess, I did like this frame a lot and wonder how effective it might be with an informed string and tension choice.

As re the PDR, the fact it's fun to play with is maybe the only thing it shares with the HPS (Eu)... Where as the HPS is easy to swing, the PDR isn't as far as I'm concerned (it has a particular balance and specifically weighted hoop area I think that isn't for me), and is altogether somewhat lacking in the maneuverability stakes. It also hugely more powerful. Lacks touch and feel in comparison. And is more muted than the HPS... not that this makes it a bad frame of course. (Far, far from it.) Just a rather different frame... IMO...

R.

Hey Ross, man that helps a lot. Yeah, similarly, the biggest drawback for me with the PDR is that it just feels awkward when swung, there's just no other way to put it. No matter what, though, I'll always have a couple Pure Controls in my bag. ;)

BigSkyChamp
11-09-2008, 04:34 PM
I'll be first to say that the HPS 6.1 is nasty and will always be nasty. I might add that you need to be able to hit a clean ball and the stick itself needs to be strung with poly (which was not available to most players during this rackets prime) @ ~60-62~ lbs and you will feel power and control that you would have never expected out of this badboy.

I use SPPP and other similar poly's with hexagonal shape for massive topsin.

Pretty Raw.

NickC
11-09-2008, 04:48 PM
^
Very true. You really need to put alot in to get something out of the stick. If you're up to it, the thing can be amazing. I've got one, and it's downright amazing off the ground. I threw a hybrid in there with some poly once (Tech. X-1 Biphase 17 mains and Big Banger Alu Rough 16L crosses at 63 pounds) and it felt near perfect when playing off the ground. Volleys were great as well. A bit lacking on serves, but I've never been able to serve well with small headsizes.