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View Full Version : How much lead to add and where ??


NoBadMojo
11-12-2008, 06:18 AM
That question comes up quite a lot around here.

-The purpose of adding lead is to customize the racquet for that PARTICULAR INDIVIDUAL, so unless someone is the exact clone of another, what's the point in asking?

-The same racquet model often varies more in weight, than the lead added. Example....someone may add 2 grams at 3 and 9 but the other persons racquet may already be 5 grams heavier <or lighter>, thus making it all irrelevant. To put it into perspective 1 gram = 3.5 HUNDRETH's of an ounce or approx the weight of a curreny note (ie . dollar bill). brings me to another point.....why do so many people rush to weigh their racquets the minute they arrive looking to bust the manufacturer because their racquets arent within a couple grams of one another? I'd much rather have racquets that weighed different amounts with the same swingweight, than racquets that all weighed the same but swung differently...static weight is the last thing people notice whilst playing tennis

-leading up to increase stability? usually takes more lead than is practical to really do the job. often what happens is that by the time enough lead is added to increase stability, the racquet becomes too hard to swing, thus making things worse. the stability issue is typically rooted in ones inability to find the sweetzone with sufficient batspeed and is operator error rather than racquet dysfunction

-leading up to move the sweeetzone? as above..takes a lot of lead to do that and obviously reduces batspeed

ps. I better state an exception before i get busted. that would be racquets that make great customizing platforms like what I am swinging. this is what some manufacturers often do with racquets made for pros. make them light to allow enough room for customization where you can add enough weight to make a big enough difference

jmverdugo
11-12-2008, 06:32 AM
...static weight is the last thing people notice whilst playing tennis



I agree with all your comments except for this one, eventhough everybody around here repeat it a lot and will jump to say that it is "a well known fact", I beleive the the sw is really important stroke wise, because the sw will be the one directly affecting you batspeed and tiring the specific muscles you use to do the swing. However the overall weight does have an influence in the stamina of your arm, on your take backs, your volleys, some part of your serve, when recovering after a stroke, is the actual weight the one you are dealing with. You do all those things as much as you do your regular stroke so your arm do get tire for doing that and the more the weight the more tired it will be. JMO.

jms007
11-12-2008, 06:37 AM
Personally, I found that 6 grams of lead adds decent stability...though i put it in relatively short strips (2 inches). Tried the longer strips, it just makes the racquet worse IMO. So i think it can be worth trying, especially if you have a lighter racquet to start with.

NoBadMojo
11-12-2008, 06:50 AM
I agree with all your comments except for this one, eventhough everybody around here repeat it a lot and will jump to say that it is "a well known fact", I beleive the the sw is really important stroke wise, because the sw will be the one directly affecting you batspeed and tiring the specific muscles you use to do the swing. However the overall weight does have an influence in the stamina of your arm, on your take backs, your volleys, some part of your serve, when recovering after a stroke, is the actual weight the one you are dealing with. You do all those things as much as you do your regular stroke so your arm do get tire for doing that and the more the weight the more tired it will be. JMO.

swingweight considers static weight

Personally, I found that 6 grams of lead adds decent stability...though i put it in relatively short strips (2 inches). Tried the longer strips, it just makes the racquet worse IMO. So i think it can be worth trying, especially if you have a lighter racquet to start with.

so 6 grams of weight in shorter strips weighs a different amount than 6 grams in longer strips?

anirut
11-12-2008, 06:56 AM
...static weight is the last thing people notice whilst playing tennis

I think this is quite true to a good extent.

People grab my 350 gram Redondo and they FEEL it's heavier than my near 370 gram Revelation Tour 90; the Rev being more head light by about 4 points.

And I should agree that adding lead, position and amount, is all personal. People can provide inputs only to serve as guidelines for those who want to try adding weight.

ClayisFun
11-12-2008, 10:05 AM
i only use lead to match racquets and change the swingweight.

For example, I find I like a swingweight of right about 330; so, if a find a racquet with a nice feel, but lower swingweight, I'll bring it up to spec. Normally, that requires less than 5 grams of lead.

I've found that larger amounts of lead just make racquets feel worse. Companies spend a lot of money designing racquets; if you fool with one too much the results never seem to be what you hoped.

NoBadMojo
11-12-2008, 10:42 AM
i only use lead to match racquets and change the swingweight.

For example, I find I like a swingweight of right about 330; so, if a find a racquet with a nice feel, but lower swingweight, I'll bring it up to spec. Normally, that requires less than 5 grams of lead.

I've found that larger amounts of lead just make racquets feel worse. Companies spend a lot of money designing racquets; if you fool with one too much the results never seem to be what you hoped.

agree and disagree

agree that matching the swingweight and balance is what you wish to do. many people seem to match the staticweight and balance, and that is no assurance the racquets will swing the same

disagree about larger amounts of lead if you are talking about a lightweight platform racquet. also think that you dont want to add small amounts of lead to an already finely tweaked quality racquet, as that is what destroys the finely tweakedness of the racquet. adding small amounts of a lead to a racquet which isnt refined to optimize weight distribution, doesnt hurt it, and can help it

sureshs
11-12-2008, 12:03 PM
so 6 grams of weight in shorter strips weighs a different amount than 6 grams in longer strips?

It changes the weight distribution, and so the SW