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View Full Version : D3 all the way to D1


maratsafin5
11-29-2008, 03:23 PM
Hey guys

In general, would you say this is accurate and if not, please correct me:

D3 averages 4.0

D2 averages 4.5

D1 averages 5.5-6.0

I'm 5.5, but I don't know my chances of playing D1

Daycrawler
11-29-2008, 03:24 PM
If self-rating, take 2.0 off your rating.

CTennis11
11-29-2008, 03:26 PM
If you take it as averages then I would say its a pretty close rating.

maratsafin5
11-29-2008, 03:26 PM
Good logic...why don't I just rate myself a 1.5 then and subtract 2...would that be better for you, moron

I am an official 5.5, having been evaluated by USTA, not a wannabee 5.5 who just thinks highly of himself, and thanks for answering the question.

Pistol Pete
11-29-2008, 04:04 PM
i know a bunch of guys who played d3 and almost beat the #1 in the country d1 the #1 from middleburry couple summers ago lost to justin chou former harvard #1 7-6 in the third the top d3 is pretty scary good depends what school

autumn_leaf
11-29-2008, 04:06 PM
i wouldn't bother averaging d3 and d2 since it varies too widely. d1 is definitely upper level. i would prolly say 5.0-6.0 since you kind of skipped the 5.0 range lol.

but just like everything else, you're ability to play at the school depends on the school you choose. so why don't you put up some names of schools and more knowledgeable people can give you better information.

maratsafin5
11-29-2008, 04:18 PM
I might apply to Stanford to play varsity hopefully...but my good friend, who is also 5.5 barely got a spot on Princeton's team, and he is bloody good. And not just a 5.5, he is a STRONG 5.5, and an average 6.0, but it just goes to show you how competitive it gets in the upper echelon's of tennis.

andfor
11-29-2008, 04:43 PM
Hey guys

In general, would you say this is accurate and if not, please correct me:

D3 averages 4.0

D2 averages 4.5

D1 averages 5.5-6.0

I'm 5.5, but I don't know my chances of playing D1

D3 averages 3.0-6.0

D2 averages 3.0-6.0

D1 averages 4.5-6.5

My ranges take into account the extremes on the low and high-ends. Stanford players are likely 5.5 to 6.5/ Most of their players are 6.0's. Have you played against any 5.5's? Do you have a sectional/national U.S. ranking and or are you rated on tennisrecruiting.com?

If you're a bonafide 5.5 with results to back it up you likely are D1 material.

tennismom42
11-29-2008, 04:49 PM
D3 averages 3.0-6.0

D2 averages 3.0-6.0

D1 averages 4.5-6.5

My ranges take into account the extremes on the low and high-ends. Stanford players are likely 5.5 to 6.5/ Most of their players are 6.0's. Have you played against any 5.5's? Do you have a sectional/national U.S. ranking and or are you rated on tennisrecruiting.com?

If you're a bonafide 5.5 with results to back it up you likely are D1 material.
I would agree with your numbers

tennismom42
11-29-2008, 04:59 PM
Hey guys

In general, would you say this is accurate and if not, please correct me:

D3 averages 4.0

D2 averages 4.5

D1 averages 5.5-6.0

I'm 5.5, but I don't know my chances of playing D1
If you are 5.5, why do you doubt your ability to play D1? Also, as many have pointed out, for some strange reason, D3 is packed full of stellar (smart) tennis players. Many 5.5s get their butt kicked in D3 because they have a target on their head.

I know a stellar player in D3, goes to Emory, which is a FINE school. He's about a 6.0. He is scarry smart. That D3school + athletics was a smart move, for him. Remember what the real goal is. Is it a scholarship? to play on the team? or to just get to go to college. Don't let other people's definitions & goals become yours.

Do NOT select a college because of it's name. This is the biggest mistake kids make. I knew a kid who really wanted to go to a particular school until he found out they didn't offer the academic program he wanted. You should have seen his face at that moment. Thank heavens he found out before he enrolled. I've seen that happen too. Do more research. Use the research software at your high school to select schools that meet your criteria.

tennis_balla
12-01-2008, 06:15 PM
Just because its D2 doesn't mean the level is lower then D1. A lot of D1 schools are not that high level playing wise. It also boils down to where a player is eligible to play. D2 is a bit more lenient when it comes to prize money and age restrictions. NAIA used to be a free for all as ex ATP players used to play there, such was th case with a good friend of mine and his team. Now I hear they're very strict on the rules.

Fedace
12-01-2008, 06:17 PM
Hey guys

In general, would you say this is accurate and if not, please correct me:

D3 averages 4.0

D2 averages 4.5

D1 averages 5.5-6.0

I'm 5.5, but I don't know my chances of playing D1

Sorry but D3 is much better than 4.0 level. they are more like 5.0 actually.

CTennis11
12-01-2008, 08:09 PM
Sorry but D3 is much better than 4.0 level. they are more like 5.0 actually.

On average there is no way d3 would be 5.0. There are those players at that level for sure, but not top to bottom.

andfor
12-02-2008, 02:38 AM
Sorry but D3 is much better than 4.0 level. they are more like 5.0 actually.

You must have skipped class the day they taught averages at Standford. JK :) I would say you might be right if you are talking about the average playing level of the #1 and #2 players on D3 teams across the country.

Julieta
12-02-2008, 12:49 PM
D3 averages 3.0-6.0

D2 averages 3.0-6.0

D1 averages 4.5-6.5

My ranges take into account the extremes on the low and high-ends. Stanford players are likely 5.5 to 6.5/ Most of their players are 6.0's. Have you played against any 5.5's? Do you have a sectional/national U.S. ranking and or are you rated on tennisrecruiting.com?

If you're a bonafide 5.5 with results to back it up you likely are D1 material.

I agree with these numbers also.

I just looked up someone who played (but not often) for a D1 school and they struggled in 4.5 USTA and got bumped down to 4.0. From this same school, the #1 player got to the semis of the Rolex (yes I am dating myself) and was probably 6.0 maybe even 6.5 player. The person they lost to that year in a close match ended up winning the final (the Rolex) easily and turned pro soon after.

Julieta
12-02-2008, 12:50 PM
Just because its D2 doesn't mean the level is lower then D1. A lot of D1 schools are not that high level playing wise. It also boils down to where a player is eligible to play. D2 is a bit more lenient when it comes to prize money and age restrictions. NAIA used to be a free for all as ex ATP players used to play there, such was th case with a good friend of mine and his team. Now I hear they're very strict on the rules.

That is true also. Back in the day NAIA could be VERY tough.

andfor
12-02-2008, 01:37 PM
That is true also. Back in the day NAIA could be VERY tough.

Still is. Just ask the D1 schools who play against the University of Auburn-Montgomery.

Way back in the day (80's) I believe Tobias Sventensson played at Flagler before transferring to OK State and Sven Groeneveld played at SW Baptist before transferring to Kansas. More recently Wesley Moody Auburn-Montgomery then Boise State and Chris Haggard Auburn-Montgomery then Tennessee. They were all amazing players and I believe they all made NAIA All-American and many made NCAA All-American. Most of these guys have had modest to very good pro careers, Moodie has won an ATP tour singles title and multiple doubles titles as well as qualifying for the ATP year-end masters doubles. Chris Haggard was very successful on the ATP doubles circuit. Groeneveld has had great success coaching the pros like Mary Pierce and Ana Ivonovic.

I'm sure someone will point out they are all foreign.

10isDad
12-02-2008, 01:55 PM
They are all foreign...;)

Actually, they have 3 seemingly domestic players this season.

Julieta
12-02-2008, 02:05 PM
Still is. Just ask the D1 schools who play against the University of Auburn-Montgomery.

Way back in the day (80's) I believe Tobias Sventensson played at Flagler before transferring to OK State and Sven Groeneveld played at SW Baptist before transferring to Kansas. More recently Wesley Moody Auburn-Montgomery then Boise State and Chris Haggard Auburn-Montgomery then Tennessee. They were all amazing players and I believe they all made NAIA All-American and many made NCAA All-American. Most of these guys have had modest to very good pro careers, Moodie has won an ATP tour singles title and multiple doubles titles as well as qualifying for the ATP year-end masters doubles. Chris Haggard was very successful on the ATP doubles circuit. Groeneveld has had great success coaching the pros like Mary Pierce and Ana Ivonovic.

I'm sure someone will point out they are all foreign.


Excellent examples of NAIA talent!

The foreign student thing has been going on for a long time. I remember looking up to a lot of those players growing up in the 70s and 80s and actually most of them were very good role models for me. I guess the difference between now and then is that back then, a school might have had a few at the top, but still had a few locals, while now some schools are 100% foreign. But they are bringing attention to the programs if winning so I guess it is not all bad. Not sure I would want to be the coach of a team of 23 year olds though...if they didnt like you it wouldn't be pretty.

andfor
12-02-2008, 03:15 PM
They are all foreign...;)

Actually, they have 3 seemingly domestic players this season.

My "all foreign" reference was to the NAIA players who tranfered to NCAA D1 not the AUM team. :wink: As useless information my son took a clinic a few years ago with Monty Tucker who was one of the instructors, nice kid.

10isDad
12-02-2008, 03:31 PM
All the foreigners that were on the ASU team were great. My comment was meant in jest. I've little problem with it.

Coach Carter
12-02-2008, 07:36 PM
I might apply to Stanford to play varsity hopefully...but my good friend, who is also 5.5 barely got a spot on Princeton's team, and he is bloody good. And not just a 5.5, he is a STRONG 5.5, and an average 6.0, but it just goes to show you how competitive it gets in the upper echelon's of tennis.

ha ha ha ha ha ha...

tyler_durden
12-06-2008, 06:51 PM
hey, maybe i can help you out. I actually do play D1 tennis for a good tennis school (don't want to name which one on this board for obvious purposes)

well the competition is VERY high, but you can't just be good at tennis in order to play. you have to be able to keep up with all the work outs and stuff. I'd say that's much harder than actually playing. so before applying to play, make sure you're ready to commit many hours to practice, on and off the court.

In terms of skill level, it depends on the school. You could be a good, strong 5.0 and play D1 (schools such as the ivys).

At my school you have to be atleast a strong 5.5 to be on this team. Most of us are 6.0s right now, and still improving fast.

Hope this helps, if you have any more questions, just ask

ClarkC
12-06-2008, 07:01 PM
i know a bunch of guys who played d3 and almost beat the #1 in the country d1 the #1 from middleburry couple summers ago lost to justin chou former harvard #1 7-6 in the third the top d3 is pretty scary good depends what school

thanks for that tremendous runon sentence that is almost unintelligible and has no punctuation and you obviously have never found the shift key on the keyboard and there are a lot of posts like this and they make me wonder if many message board posts these days are actually part of some statistical experiment involving chimpanzees typing on keyboards to see if one of them produces a complete work by shakespeare but instead some post about tennis came out but anyway i agree with the general point that the very best division 3 players are very good that is all for now

dunno
12-15-2008, 08:32 PM
My brother played D1 at a decent school for a year, not high but not bad either, and yeah the workouts are probably the most brootal part.

Now me and my brother are at a D3 school playing, I don't really want to try to get into a D1 school since the situation I'm in right now is fine. But some of the D3 schools we play against are very good. And some of the D1 schools my brother played against were barely above average, while some of the ones he saw in florida were sickeningly amazing.

I the skill just varies a lot from school to school and what part of the country you are in.

AndrewD
12-15-2008, 10:36 PM
Moodie has won an ATP tour singles title and multiple doubles titles as well as qualifying for the ATP year-end masters doubles.

Most importantly, he won the Wimbledon doubles title. Not something many NAIA players would have done (or many Div I players).

I actually do play D1 tennis for a good tennis school (don't want to name which one on this board for obvious purposes)

Mate, if you can't say where you play why bother to mention it at all? Given that there are a number of blokes on this board who currently play, coach or have played college tennis (as well as those who hold national, state, etc rankings) and aren't afraid to say what school they attend/ed, I can only think of one obvious reason why you'd keep quite about it.

andfor
12-16-2008, 05:57 AM
Most importantly, he won the Wimbledon doubles title. Not something many NAIA players would have done (or many Div I players).

Forgot to mention Paul Haarhuis went to Armstrong Atlantic for a couple of years before transfering to Florida State. Not sure if when he went there if they where DII or NAIA. He won a few pro doubles titles. DUH!

diadorakuerten
12-16-2008, 07:07 AM
I played for a D1 school when I was at the 5.0 level. I ended up playing #1 spot for a while and my level was not better than 5.0-low 5.5. That was back in the late 90s though. I probably wouldn't make the team now... This was in California, in the West Coast Conference which is not very good if you take out Pepperdine and San Diego.

Coach Carter
12-17-2008, 05:03 AM
Mate, if you can't say where you play why bother to mention it at all? Given that there are a number of blokes on this board who currently play, coach or have played college tennis (as well as those who hold national, state, etc rankings) and aren't afraid to say what school they attend/ed, I can only think of one obvious reason why you'd keep quite about it.

plus only 1 Durden in college tennis, on rosters, period (any level)...a girl...

dunno
12-17-2008, 10:28 AM
plus only 1 Durden in college tennis, on rosters, period (any level)...a girl...

Tyler Durden is actually a name that comes from a book, so I don't think that's his real name lol.

plasma
12-19-2008, 01:43 AM
that's insane, the op asked a simple question and got ten nut-job answers
here's #11:
5.5 gives you a great shot at any d1 school. If you dont already have a reigonal or state ranking we might wanna take stanford off of that list. See which schools have the hottest chicks, the cheapest bud, and a laid back coach who will let you miss an occasional practice. Your only consideration besides bud, chicks and really good local dive bars with hungry college tail, is seeking good scholarship money. If you were going pro you'd probably know by now. College is all about the chicks, the parties, and a van full of your best buddies spending hours driving to other schools to kick *** tennis style...maybe a d2 or d3 school would fork over a scholarship easier???

Coach Carter
12-21-2008, 12:14 PM
Tyler Durden is actually a name that comes from a book, so I don't think that's his real name lol.

ah interesting...

mombops
12-29-2008, 03:52 PM
Hey guys

In general, would you say this is accurate and if not, please correct me:

D3 averages 4.0

D2 averages 4.5

D1 averages 5.5-6.0

I'm 5.5, but I don't know my chances of playing D1

It depends where you want to play. I think a genuine 5.5 player could make a D1 squad, there's no question about that. Depending on your skill level compared to the rest of the team, you may or may not play. I've seen walk-ons for D1 teams that were closer to a 4.5, but did they play much? No. If you are really a 5.5 caliber player, you have a good shot at making a D1 team and perhaps playing a couple matches.

Mada
12-29-2008, 07:18 PM
Good logic...why don't I just rate myself a 1.5 then and subtract 2...would that be better for you, moron

I am an official 5.5, having been evaluated by USTA, not a wannabee 5.5 who just thinks highly of himself, and thanks for answering the question.

You have a negative record against 1 stars. Nuff said.

cncretecwbo
12-30-2008, 07:10 PM
if you are good enough to play d1, you dont have to ask