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View Full Version : 1979 Borg df. Roscoe Tanner, was it a good match?


Tenny
02-16-2005, 04:12 PM
Hi everyone,

I am not familiar with Roscoe Tanner except the match, his recent news being arrested(?), his big serve. Is it true he destroyed the net in that match? Overall, was it a good match? Was he a good player (against Borg)? S&V or baseliner?

Thnx!

Datacipher
02-16-2005, 04:14 PM
Yes, he broke the net cord. They had to delay the match to bring out a replacement net.

Jet Rink
02-16-2005, 04:24 PM
Tanner gave Borg a good match. You could say that he was the first "Roddick" - one of the biggest serves tennis has seen, certainly in that era - and it is sure interesting to see that happening with a wood racquet. He's a tall guy, but wasn't an S&V'er or even really an "all-court" guy, in my opinion. Back then players weren't nearly as defined as they are now - exceptions would be for guys like Mac, then later, Edberg (pure S&V for example).

Heck, if you can get mid-seventies stuff featuring Borg up until '81 when he retired, you see a significant improvement in his net skills and his serve. His serve became a formidable weapon.

Borg of course, like he did to everyone else in those days, wore Roscoe down, accepting the inevitable aces but retrieving like nobody before or since. The guy possessed absolute speed on the court.

I would say that any chance you get to watch Borg, you should take it. He was marvelous and the current game owes a lot to him in many facets.

Jet

Tenny
02-16-2005, 04:26 PM
Yes, he broke the net cord. They had to delay the match to bring out a replacement net.


Thanks Datacipher,

I've got questions.
1. Was it a serve or ground stroke?
2. After the ball broke the net, did it go in or fell back to Tanner's court? If it was the former case and it was not serve, did they continue to play? Kinda silly question, I believe it's a serve but anyway...
3. I can hardly imagine the force of a tennis ball even though it was a very hard serve can break a net cord. What exactly happened? Which part of the net broke?
4. Do you have any idea how fast was his serve?
5. How was the match in general? Exciting?
Thanks,

EDIT) Jet Rink, thanks for your post. I think you posted yours just before I did mine. BTW, I assume you are a fan of 'Giant (Taylor, Hudson, and Dean)'?

Datacipher
02-16-2005, 04:56 PM
1.It was a serve
2.I actually do not remember.
3.Neither can I...and as I understand it, it was the wire net cord itself that snapped.
4. Rosoce could regularly get into the 130+mph zone with his aluminum racquet. He was recorded at 153mph and 142mph in fast serve contests. Bear in mind all these readings are variable depending on device and event. However, despite what some say, I think it's quite safe to say he served over 130mph consistently when going for it(which in real matches even he didn't as much as the guys today). Why am I sure of this? Well in 1991 he was recorded at 135mph on seniors tour which was faster than the atp record that year of 134mph(bear in mind that would be more like 140-145mph on the davis cup radar today). When I was talking to Vic Braden about it one day, he told me (he had done extensive analysis on tanner) that Rosoce was consistently hitting in the 130's on the day they analyzed him on computer. Vic was also quick to tell me that was 130+mph on the COMPUTER analysis, so it was much more accurate and definitive than the radar, which actually tended to give pretty comparable results with the computer data in Vic's tests anyways.

I also believe it, because I've seen Tanner serve in person in retirement....you cannot appreciate his motion until you see it in person....it's the most biomechanically efficient and perfectly timed movement ever seen in tennis, in my opinion. Absolutely breathtaking. Not comparable to anything seen today, in beauty or speed. On tv...his motion just looked kind of quick and odd...in person....it's athletic perfection.

Unfortunately I am a bit too young to have seen Tanner live in his prime.

5.I have never seen the entire match! I don't own it....I did watch a lot of it on somebody else's copy....for analysis alone....so I'll reserve judgement.


A few notes:

Tanner was not that tall....listed at 6 feet...but he seemed a touch shorter than that in person

He didnt' usually get that bomb in as much as the biggest servers today....possibly because of his height...possibly because of the inhumanely precise timing required for his motion....possibly because I don't think any of the guys back then dreamed you could put 135mph serves in the court consistently!

West Coast Ace
02-16-2005, 05:14 PM
I have a funny story about this match. I was so excited to watch it - I thought Tanner could give Borg trouble on a fast track and might even pull off the upset. Unfortunately I worked at a golf course and had to get up at 5AM to go cut the greens. I cut my 5 greens and rushed home. I watched the first few games, promptly fell asleep on the sofa, and woke up to see match point. Oh, well...

AAAA
02-16-2005, 05:33 PM
I think modern racquets make it easier to hit hard more of the time.

tandayu
02-16-2005, 08:08 PM
Are you referring to Wimbledon final or US open? The Wimbledon final was a good match. The US open was played at night, Borg had hard time returning Roscoe's service under the light.

Tenny
02-16-2005, 08:23 PM
Are you referring to Wimbledon final or US open? The Wimbledon final was a good match. The US open was played at night, Borg had hard time returning Roscoe's service under the light.

I believe it's the Wimbly final '79 (breaking net cord). I believe it's 3 set match.

Tenny

Kirko
02-16-2005, 08:31 PM
I thopught the semi with Dupre and Tanner was a better match Borg had Tanner's # like almost everyone else.

Pushmaster
02-16-2005, 08:46 PM
I just wonder how much faster Tanner's serve would have been with something like the Pure Drive+?

tandayu
02-16-2005, 09:07 PM
1979 Wimbledon final was 5 sets. The broken net cord was US open QF. Then Roscoe lost to Vitas Gerulaitas in SF. Mc Enroe beat Vitas in final.

Roscoe's serve will always fast no matter which technology is applied to the racket.

wildbill88AA
02-16-2005, 09:39 PM
roscoe hit the ball on the way up, also.

Kaptain Karl
02-16-2005, 09:58 PM
roscoe hit the ball on the way up, also.Actually "No". In the mid-70's Tennis Mag devoted one of its feature articles to an analysis of Roscoe's serve. They displayed several frames of their high speed film, showing that Tanner was astoundingly consistent at hitting the ball *just* as it stopped its rise. It just *looked* like he was hitting it as the toss was still going UP.

(No. I cannot remember which issue, etc....)

- KK

Stormwolf
02-16-2005, 10:03 PM
does anyone have a clip of this guy's serve?
- fascinated to analyze his motion (and perhaps duplicate it hehe)
...serving in the low 100s with my PT 280 :(

Datacipher
02-16-2005, 10:14 PM
Actually "No". In the mid-70's Tennis Mag devoted one of its feature articles to an analysis of Roscoe's serve. They displayed several frames of their high speed film, showing that Tanner was astoundingly consistent at hitting the ball *just* as it stopped its rise. It just *looked* like he was hitting it as the toss was still going UP.

(No. I cannot remember which issue, etc....)

- KK

True, I have watched a lot of footage of Tanner's serve. Much of it from Braden, who showed conclusively that Tanner hit it at the exact peak. HOWEVER, in real life, the impression was definitely that the ball was still rising, because Tanner hit it so quickly and the toss was so short.

A funny story about that Tennis Mag article, (Which I have NEVER SEEN!, I do have a 70's analysis of Tanner's serve in a book with DRAWINGS of Tanner...lol) is that the pictures were supposed to look a bit odd and of poor photographic quality...the reason being that the day they had Tanner for the photo shoot it was raining.....despite the water, they went to some local courts and shot pictures anyways, on soaking courts.

Kaptain Karl
02-16-2005, 10:23 PM
Geez!!! I am pretty sure I remember the weird "sheen" the court surface had in those shots. I decided -- ignorantly -- it was because of the high speed film.

[KK files away another bit of information most people don't give a hoot about....]

- KK

Datacipher
02-16-2005, 10:30 PM
does anyone have a clip of this guy's serve?
- fascinated to analyze his motion (and perhaps duplicate it hehe)
...serving in the low 100s with my PT 280 :(

If you get the chance to see his serve Stormwolf you'll note several differences between Tanner and the textbook form today. Besides the blinding speed of the motion and the toss to the exact height of impact. For example, Tanner's shoulder's remained relatively level, he did not see saw them with the tossing shoulder up, and the racquet should down low. He did not use a pronounced kneebend. At times in his career he used a quick small kneebend and at other times, barely any. He did not use a pronounced shoulder turn, his shoulders turned barely past 90 degrees. There was no "trophy pose" position, it was a purely natural motion, without the slightest hesitation or pause. The last thing you saw clearly was him bouncing the ball, then his racquet would whip around in a blinding figure 8 while simulaneously, the toss would release and appear to rise to the exact point at which his body and racquet would unwind to strike the ball. On tv, it just looks like a simple, fast motion, it was actually disappointing when I first saw it on video....like..."that's it?!"....although from a biomechanical sense I realized the beauty.... In person, the precision and speed, look like a robot designed to serve. Perfection. I remember when I saw Tanner up close serving...I turned to my friend who was a very good junior but who was skeptical of Tanner and I said..."what do you think?" His mouth was hanging open and he said with a blank
stare "I"VE....NEVER....SEEN....ANYTHING....LIKE....THAT" lol.

When you start to understand Tanner's serve, you'll understand true biomechanical efficiency...not the stuff you see being taught today. That stuff can certainly be effective and there is nothing "wrong" with it...but in terms of athletic efficiency and beauty....well there's no comparision. Like watching Federer's forehand, vs. a jerky, hitchy club player forehand.

Having said that....imitating Tanner's serve is not easy....in fact I'm sure almost no coach today, even knows how to teach it or understands it fully(maybe Braden who's serve model is largely in line with Tanner). I wouldn't even try, unless someone was willing to overhaul their motion completely....basically....in a way...anything you've learned to do modelled after the current serving model....is wrong and would need to be unlearned. You can pick up some of Tanner's traits and try to incorporate them though.

Camilio Pascual
02-17-2005, 03:56 AM
It also had perhaps the most significant bathroom break in tennis history. Anyone remember why?

lanky
02-17-2005, 04:13 AM
Ive seen tanner serve live.It was incredible and nothing like before or since. Datacipher is spot on when he describes the technique.All I saw live was tanner bouncing the ball then a complete blur as he appeared to hit the ball on the way up.He wasnt tall but seemed to be strong.The serve seemed to be analagous to simply standing there and hitting the ball as fast as you can.Try it .you can get a pretty good serve this way if youre timing is correct.

baseliner
02-17-2005, 04:46 AM
Remember Roscoe did all this with a wood racket (at least during his prime). To those who denigrate his career, remember he has one GS title to his resume' (AO). Also I remember he came out with a new hairdo before the Wimby final--a perm with curls if I remember correctly. I saw him play in person and to be up close and personal to that powerful a serve was truly an unforgetable experience.

gregraven
02-17-2005, 04:54 AM
One of Vic Braden's instructional videotapes shows Roscoe Tanner serving. Vic uses it to illustrate one of his points, but the way Roscoe hits the ball JUST as it stops rising, it does appear not only that the ball is still on the way up, but also that it is much lower than he could be hitting it.

AndrewD
02-17-2005, 04:55 AM
Not sure if these links will come up but worth a try. Gives you a little idea how low Tanner's toss was compared to most other players and how compact the whole motion was

http://www.tenniscollectables.com/tannerautoyellow.gif

http://www.blackburneds.com/assets/images/rosco1.jpg

Kaptain Karl
02-17-2005, 06:03 AM
It also had perhaps the most significant bathroom break in tennis history. Anyone remember why?
No. Why?
_____________

As a Jr, we would fool around imitating different Pro's signature shots. I was a pretty good mimic, but two guys' strokes really messed up my game if I copied them more than a few times in a session:
Connors' BH and Tanner's serve.

(Funny thing was, copying Borg's open stance FH was laughed at by my friends. [Borg hit it about 40% of his FHs.] But I was noticing some weird beauty to it as I imitated it. I guess that helped me "transition" my game when these newer, more powerful rackets -- which seem to even *promote* the open stance FH -- came into being.)

- KK

Rabbit
02-17-2005, 06:43 AM
Tanner's serve was a thing of beauty. I liken it to Dan Marino's release, no wasted motion and basically perfect.

Tanner's game was built around his serve and volley, the rest of his game was decidedly a notch below. If any of you have The Tennis Channel, keep your eyes open. The 1978 edition of the WITC has Tanner playing Gerualitis in a very good match.

Dedans Penthouse
02-17-2005, 06:45 AM
It also had perhaps the most significant bathroom break in tennis history. Anyone remember why?

I think it was because officials at the A.E.L.T.C. allowed IRS agents onto the grounds to look for some lefty blond from Lookout Mt., TN.

Tenny: as to the match, in the beginning of the 5th set, Borg broke Tanner's serve, and from there (you could sense it), Borg was going to run out the set which he did. You never got the sense that the stubborn Borg was going to give Tanner so much as a whiff of a "break point" in that 5th set.

At the U.S. Open, they did play under the lights and Roscoe beat Borg. This was after Lennart Bergelin (Borg's coach) complained that no "top-rung/high seeded" player like Borg should be subjected to playing a match at night under lights.

sidebar: Then again, considering the Lennart Bergelin-designed and endorsed racquet frame from MacGregor, one can see that old Lennart (at times) wasn't wrapped too tightly himself. Remember when Borg beat McEnroe at the '80 Wimby, and the camera flashed the picture of Bergelin's shuddering, clentched fisted "JA!!!" reaction? Ol' Lennart looked like Werner Klemperer (Col. Klink in the TV show "Hogan's Heros") railing in exaperation at Bob "Fettish-Boy" Crane.

So Borg beat Tanner in 5, then beat McEnroe in '80 in 5 and eventually got beat by McEnroe in '81 in 4. Another irrelavant sidebar: Was lucky enough to see Borg's last Wimbledon win, a 5 set gem vs. Connors in the '81 semis that ended at around 9:30 in the evening. Connors came out blazing and "bagled" Borg in the 1st set; Borg returned the favor in the 4th.
I've got to get around to somehow transferring the pictures I took during that match to digital in order to post them here -- talk about Tanner breaking the net? There's one photo I took from that Borg-Connors semi that shows Borg on the ground, tangled up in the net like a trapped shark. What happened was Borg was racing in from the baseline in an attempt to reach a Connors drop volley. Borg (running at what seemed like 120 mph/193 Km) lost his footing and "flew" forward and crashed big-time into the net -- Connors, along with a young African-British ballboy (respendent in his green and purple outfit) have both come over to see if Borg is OK and are standing over him as the prone Borg tries to extricate his feet/legs/arms from the net--wild photo if I do say so).

Galactus
02-17-2005, 06:53 AM
Roscoe Tanner...I actually watched him live in action at his peak...however there is a complete downside to this: I was only 9 at the time and had no appreciation or knowledge of tennis or serving techniques!
It was on a school-trip to the Nottingham Open (I live 20 mins away) in England back in June '75 which in those days was the main grass-court tune-up for Wimbledon.
The reason why we went was to watch the big name at the time, Jimmy Connors but that court was packed out solid so we watched Britian's #1, John Lloyd who was shceduled to meet Tanner in the 1st round (I think)...poor John got blown away in about 45 mins if I remember (Connors must have been gloating - didn't Lloyd start seeing Chrissie Evert in '75??)

Anyway, what I remember about the Tanner match is the great thumping sound his serves made as they hit the canvas surrounding-barriers...everyone at school the following day naturally attempted to serve the ball is fast as possible during games-session.
Ahhhh, the naivety of youth!

(ironic side-note: 30 years on, the tournament site has moved a mile down the road, but the Nottingham Tennis Centre is now open to the public and I'm off down there for a game in about 2 hours time!) ;)

Rabbit
02-17-2005, 06:59 AM
Didn't the bathroom break have something to do with some busted shorts?

Datacipher
02-17-2005, 07:07 AM
Didn't the bathroom break have something to do with some busted shorts?

I don't think so, but that would have been funnier! Becker had that problem once....

I think he's referring to a bathroom break Tanner manufactured to delay his Wimbledon final with Borg. This enabled NBC to broadcast it's 1st live Wimbledon final on schedule......the All England club had refused to move the scheduled start to a tv friendly time.

Datacipher
02-17-2005, 07:10 AM
sidebar: Then again, considering the Lennart Bergelin-designed and endorsed racquet frame from MacGregor, one can see that old Lennart (at times) wasn't wrapped too tightly himself. Remember when Borg beat McEnroe at the '80 Wimby, and the camera flashed the picture of Bergelin's shuddering, clentched fisted "JA!!!" reaction? Ol' Lennart looked like Werner Klemperer (Col. Klink in the TV show "Hogan's Heros") railing in exaperation at Bob "Fettish-Boy" Crane.

).

LOL. I've seen Col. Klink....errr I mean Bergelin's frame....didnt' exactly take off....

Jet Rink
02-17-2005, 07:29 AM
As a Jr, we would fool around imitating different Pro's signature shots. I was a pretty good mimic, but two guys' strokes really messed up my game if I copied them more than a few times in a session:
Connors' BH and Tanner's serve.

(Funny thing was, copying Borg's open stance FH was laughed at by my friends. [Borg hit it about 40% of his FHs.] But I was noticing some weird beauty to it as I imitated it. I guess that helped me "transition" my game when these newer, more powerful rackets -- which seem to even *promote* the open stance FH -- came into being.)

- KK

Maybe we should start a thread regarding "imitating famous shots!" I got messed up trying to imitate Mac's serve - although that significant body turn did indeed feel good regarding arm/lower back. Although, Bob Lutz's serve was quite easy, as I remember!

I've sure been enjoying this thread. Maybe somebody can get a hold of a clip of Roscoe.

Jet

Kaptain Karl
02-17-2005, 07:40 AM
I think he's referring to a bathroom break Tanner manufactured to delay his Wimbledon final with Borg.
Now *this* I do remember. Data's correct.

Imagine ... you're Roscoe Tanner, preparing for THE biggest match of your life, against THE best player of that age, on THE court which defines tennis ... and some NBC operative interrupts your preparation with a distraction like this. Dooh!!!

I also heard that even though the Wimby folks knew what Tanner was doing, they could not bring themselve to barge into the bathroom and drag him onto Centre Court. (What "behind the scenes intrigue" goes on in many tournaments ... and we never know...?)

- KK

Kaptain Karl
02-17-2005, 08:00 AM
Then again, considering the Lennart Bergelin-designed and endorsed racquet frame from MacGregor, one can see that old Lennart (at times) wasn't wrapped too tightly himself.
I missed this one. What was this racket's "distingushing characteristic?"

- KK

Kaptain Karl
02-17-2005, 08:02 AM
Oops! Double-posted somehow....

- KK

Rabbit
02-17-2005, 08:41 AM
That's right!

Camilio Pascual
02-17-2005, 09:00 AM
I don't think so, but that would have been funnier! Becker had that problem once....

I think he's referring to a bathroom break Tanner manufactured to delay his Wimbledon final with Borg. This enabled NBC to broadcast it's 1st live Wimbledon final on schedule......the All England club had refused to move the scheduled start to a tv friendly time.

Bingo! 123456

FLAG3264
02-17-2005, 11:31 AM
Camilio,

If I recall correctly (sometimes I have a senior moment lol!) the announcer's wanted these few minutes to do a proper introduction such as the now famous coming out of the tunnel shot, and pre match commentary. The All England Club traditionally had the first ball of the final match struck at 2 pm London time, which was 9 am eastern standard time, which was when the coverage started here in the New York area.

atatu
02-17-2005, 12:02 PM
I remember Tanner hitting a great topspin lob over Borg to win the first set, I was a junior in high school at the time, watching it in Indonesia....I also seem to recall that Tanner wasn't using wood, I thought he was using the PDP ("Professionally Designed Products") aluminum frame at that time ? Maybe I'm confused. Too bad he turned out to be a convict, best player to ever come out of Lookout Mountain, Tenn.

Dedans Penthouse
02-17-2005, 12:12 PM
I missed this one. What was this racket's "distingushing characteristic?"

- KK

The MacGregor Bergelin was a racquet that was "snowshoe" in shape that had allowed for an "elogated string" pattern that extended below the bottom of the racquet "hoop" and the stringing pattern itself was "criss-cross" like those Mad Raq frames. Anyway, it was one of those racquets you could "customize" on the spot (along with the Puma Becker Super). Both racquets allowed for a screw-like device to be inserted into the bottom of the handle (the butt), and in the case of the Puma Becker, you'd turn the screw and the handle would move telescopically (lengthen or shorten the racquet frame)

In the case of the Col. Klink, er, the MacGregor Bergelin, you could twist this little knobby water spigget of a screw device into the butt end of the handle and (get this) change the tension of the strings. Again, the "mains" went on a slant and were very, very long. The racquet hoop had sharp angles to it (wasn't round or eliptical)....sort of like the sharp edges you see on Cadillacs today (if that makes any sense).

AAAA
02-17-2005, 04:59 PM
Apart from Henri Leconte I haven't seen any other pro with a service motion even remotely like the description of Tanner's serve. I seem to recall he could hit around 130mph or atleast faster than most other pros during the days of Lendl and Becker. It happened rarely though because he was never committed enough to tennis.

Datacipher
02-17-2005, 05:04 PM
Apart from Henri Leconte I haven't seen any other pro with a service motion even remotely like the description of Tanner's serve. I seem to recall he could hit around 130mph or atleast faster than most other pros during the days of Lendl and Becker. It happened rarely though because he was never committed enough to tennis.

Leconte had a wonderfully easy, quick and graceful motion and it was somewhat similar to Tanner's except Tanner's motion was much much faster and a bit more economical than Henri's believe it or not.

AAAA
02-17-2005, 05:13 PM
Leconte had a wonderfully easy, quick and graceful motion and it was somewhat similar to Tanner's except Tanner's motion was much much faster and a bit more economical than Henri's believe it or not.

I was always amazed by how Henri could hit his serves so fast with what looked like so little effort. If Tanner's was even better it much have been really something to behold.

Camilio Pascual
02-18-2005, 03:18 AM
Camilio,

If I recall correctly (sometimes I have a senior moment lol!) the announcer's wanted these few minutes to do a proper introduction such as the now famous coming out of the tunnel shot, and pre match commentary. The All England Club traditionally had the first ball of the final match struck at 2 pm London time, which was 9 am eastern standard time, which was when the coverage started here in the New York area.

That's right, NBC (or was HBO covering back then?) wanted play to start a few minutes after the hour to allow for commercials and an intro. Tanner was asked to delay the proceedings. He showed the Big Boys from NY he knew how to play the game on and off the court.

Rabbit
02-18-2005, 05:10 AM
I also seem to recall that Tanner wasn't using wood, I thought he was using the PDP ("Professionally Designed Products") aluminum frame at that time ? Maybe I'm confused.

You are not confused, Tanner was using the PDP Open, which he used the majority of his career. PDP went under, and he changed to the LeCoq Spotif TXP, which was another funny looking racket. It had the normal configuration with an open throat, but then had a third, round piece of graphite that came from the handle through the middle of the open throat. I owned both frames at one time or another. We had a guy here locally pushing PDP and the LeCoq Spotif frame was just too weird to pass up.

Kaptain Karl
02-18-2005, 07:19 AM
<tanget> We used to say "PDP" stood for "Pretty Darn Poor." The plastic throats on the Open broke a lot. We would call the Open a "Poor Man's Head Professional" ... also known by the tag, "Red Head."

But the worst PDP was the FiberStaff. (Remember that perfectly round head?) The sweetspot on that piece o' junk was about the size of a nickle. Even my friend who got sponsored by them refused to play the FiberStaff -- and that's what PDP wanted to send him. (He jumped at Snauwert, when they came calling....) </tangent>

- KK

Rabbit
02-18-2005, 08:12 AM
But the worst PDP was the FiberStaff. (Remember that perfectly round head?) The sweetspot on that piece o' junk was about the size of a nickle. Even my friend who got sponsored by them refused to play the FiberStaff -- and that's what PDP wanted to send him. (He jumped at Snauwert, when they came calling....)

- KK

Well, we used Pretty Damn Poor.....

I have two Fibrestaffs and back in the day even played with one. I always liked their looks. You're right, they do have an extra refined sweet spot.

There was a guy I used to play against who also played with it. (Maybe that's where I got my desire for one from.) Anyway, he had his strung with VS gut and if you remember because of the denseness of the string pattern in the old rackets, string jobs lasted a while. He was so consistent that he had a dark spot in the middle of his racket about the size of a tennis ball. That was always impressive to me. I never could do that.

Kaptain Karl
02-19-2005, 11:16 AM
... He was so consistent that he had a dark spot in the middle of his racket about the size of a tennis ball. That was always impressive to me. I never could do that.That reminds me: When I was a Jr, the best player in town was this 40-something man, who wore his strings "dead center" too. We kids wanted to emulate him ... without the ability. On opening a new can of balls, we would rub the "Wilson" or "Penn" ink in a tiny circle on our strings, transferring the ball's ink to our sweet spots.

(I haven't remembered that for a long time....)

- KK

Datacipher
02-19-2005, 01:08 PM
Tenny, JetRink, Stormwolf, if you like you can send me an email through the board....I may be able to help you with a couple of those clips....if I can find them on my backups....

hokienation
02-19-2005, 04:03 PM
i believe Tanners's racquet was a metal frame (not wood). It had an orange throatpiece but I cannot recall the maker

Kaptain Karl
02-19-2005, 05:28 PM
i believe Tanners's racquet was a metal frame (not wood). It had an orange throatpiece but I cannot recall the makerYes. The PDP Open, as we have mentioned.

- KK