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pandal3oy
12-11-2008, 01:46 PM
well i was thinking about going back to school. maybe to get a masters or even just another bachelor's degree in something i like more. i heard someone mention a rule like 4 yrs of tennis eligibility in 5 yrs of full time school. does that mean my chances are already gone since i graduated? i would love to play for a D3 school if any. im a 4.0 player so i know im not the best of the crop but like i said it doesnt really matter where i go. i want to kind of relax from work and goto school and play with a team. anyone know the rules? thanks!

Nanshiki
12-11-2008, 01:53 PM
It's not really fair to people to never played sports in college, but yes, NCAA rules say you're not eligible.

pandal3oy
12-11-2008, 10:38 PM
that sucks. are there loop holes around that? they can take my degree back! i dont really like it anyways. i dont mind going through another 4 years LOL.

goober
12-12-2008, 05:35 AM
It's not really fair to people to never played sports in college, but yes, NCAA rules say you're not eligible.

Are you sure about that? I think that only applies to D1 schools. There was player last spring that played on a local D2 team and she was 60 years old. Tennis magazine ran a story recently about 2 women who were in their 40s playing on a D3 team.

I definitely know he can play NAIA.

10isDad
12-12-2008, 05:42 AM
Are you sure about that? I think that only applies to D1 schools. There was player last spring that played on a local D2 team and she was 60 years old. Tennis magazine ran a story recently about 2 women who were in their 40s playing on a D3 team.

I definitely know he can play NAIA.

I think the difference is Sheila never graduated previously. The OP already obtained an undergraduate degree.

Additionally, there are different eligibility regulations for the different divisions. Note the following (Full article: http://www.ncaa.org/wps/ncaa?ContentID=10759):

The legislation, an amendment to Bylaws 14.2.4 and 14.3.1, states:

"In Division I, subsequent to graduating from high school...a student-athlete shall have one year in order to be immediately eligible upon and retain the opportunity for four seasons of competition upon initial, full-time collegiate enrollment...."

Bylaw 14.2.4.2 later states: "A student who does not enroll at a collegiate institution as a full-time student during the one-year period shall be subject to the following:

"(a) The student-athlete shall be charged with a season of intercollegiate tennis eligibility for each calendar year after graduation from high school ...and before full-time collegiate enrollment during which the student-athlete has participated in organized tennis events;
"(b) Upon matriculation at the certifying institution, the student-athlete must fulfill an academic year in residence before being eligible to represent the institution in intercollegiate tennis competition."

"Our intention in drafting the rule was that after a year's grace period, players would run into sanctions if they played organized tennis during the next year and any years after," said Benjamin. "It was a way of creating a fairer playing environment."

goober
12-12-2008, 06:27 AM
The NCAA stance on graduate students

Graduate Student Eligibility
A student-athlete who is enrolled in a graduate or professional school of the college or university which he/she previously attended as an undergraduate student may participate in intercollegiate athletics, provided he/she has eligibility remaining and is within five calendar years of initial full-time collegiate enrollment for Division I and within the first ten full-time semesters of collegiate enrollment for Divisions II and III.

A student-athlete who has eligibility remaining and is within the specified five-year or ten-semester period also may participate while enrolled in a graduate or professional school at a Division I or II college or university other than the institution at which he/she completed an undergraduate degree, provided he/she meets the criteria of the one-time transfer exception to the general transfer residence requirement. That exception is as follows:

The student-athlete must be seeking to participate in a sport other than Division I football, basketball and men's ice hockey, except that a student-athlete who seeks to participate in Division I-AA football may use this exception only if transferring from a Division I-A program.
The student-athlete may not have transferred previously from another four-year institution unless he/she transferred previously and received an exception to the transfer residence requirement because his/her institution either discontinued the sport or did not sponsor the sport in which the student-athlete is a participant.
The student must have been in good academic standing and eligible to compete had he/she decided to remain at the previous institution.
The student-athlete's previous institution must certify in writing that it has no objection to the student-athlete being granted an exception to the transfer residence requirement.
NOTE: This exception does not apply to a student-athlete who attends a Division III institution for graduate school, unless the student-athlete is attending the same institution at which he/she was an undergraduate.

NOTE: If the student-athlete transfers to the certifying institution from a Division III member institution and meets the above-mentioned conditions, he or she may be eligible to compete but may not receive athletically related financial aid during that year.

Please contact the certifying institution or conference for additional information. You also may contact the NCAA membership services staff at 317/917-6222 if you have further questions.



Personally if I were you I would call that number on the bottom of the paragraph directly rather than relying on any of us for your info.

10isDad
12-12-2008, 06:32 AM
Personally if I were you I would call that number on the bottom of the paragraph directly rather than relying on any of us for your info.

I would agree.

pandal3oy
12-12-2008, 12:58 PM
lol thanks for helping everyone. yea legal language gets so confusing with IF/OR/AND/BUT/ONLY words. i guess a simple phone call and ask "can you speak english to me please?" hahaha.

Lindsay
12-12-2008, 02:26 PM
Division 1 is ruled out. But I think you still might be eligible to play Division 3. I don't know about D2. Because you never started your eligibility, I think you would be eligible to begin another undergraduate degree, but it may have to be at the same school you went to before. That last part, I'm not sure about. But I do think you're eligible because the original post by 10sDad is only for Division 1. I know if D3 you have 10 semesters to complete 8 semesters of eligibility, but since you never started them, I don't think it counts.

Coach Carter
12-13-2008, 07:11 PM
well i was thinking about going back to school. maybe to get a masters or even just another bachelor's degree in something i like more. i heard someone mention a rule like 4 yrs of tennis eligibility in 5 yrs of full time school. does that mean my chances are already gone since i graduated? i would love to play for a D3 school if any. im a 4.0 player so i know im not the best of the crop but like i said it doesnt really matter where i go. i want to kind of relax from work and goto school and play with a team. anyone know the rules? thanks!

get in touch with me...I'd like to know your situation. I'm a D3 coach at a good school with a good team...and I'd love to add a 4.0 to my women's team. email me: dougcarter@letu.edu

pandal3oy
12-15-2008, 11:11 AM
get in touch with me...I'd like to know your situation. I'm a D3 coach at a good school with a good team...and I'd love to add a 4.0 to my women's team. email me: dougcarter@letu.edu

too bad im a guy O_o lol. i dont think they would take me too kindly during competition LOL.

Coach Carter
12-17-2008, 06:08 AM
too bad im a guy O_o lol. i dont think they would take me too kindly during competition LOL.

sorry...

hey, I'd get you a wig...

hairy legs = foreign ;)

kidding of course...

edl
01-15-2009, 09:35 AM
The NCAA stance on graduate students



Personally if I were you I would call that number on the bottom of the paragraph directly rather than relying on any of us for your info.

So what are your opinions on what "attended as an undergraduate (regardless of having a US degree or not)" mean? Could this be a 1 hour summer class before starting the grad program? That fits the letter of the law, but maybe not the spirit. However the spirit is stupid, why make it more difficult for kids at D3 schools (obviously,non-scholarship) who are there mainly for education, to experience collegiate athletics?