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vmosrafa08
12-23-2008, 04:34 PM
I'm a beginner and I'm about to buy a guitar...I don't know whether to get a acoustic guitar or a electric guitar.
There are many aspects to consider. I'm a beginner, so which would be better? I will travel with it, so which is easier to carry (bulk/weight)?
Noise isn't a big problem, but which guitar is more fun to play? This is a guitar that I'm considering... http://www.fender.com/products//search.php?partno=0961006021

S H O W S T O P P E R !
12-23-2008, 04:39 PM
Buy an accoustic guitar. It's better for learning guitar.

vmosrafa08
12-23-2008, 04:51 PM
Electric guitars are more expensive... so I guess a acoustic guitar would be better, but which brand?? I'm looking at Fender, but there are so many models that I don't know which one to get. Can anyone help?

baek57
12-23-2008, 05:21 PM
my thoughts: its easier to travel with an acoustic as you don't need to carry an amp around. as far as which is more fun to play id say that depends on what kind of music you'd like to play. also, i found it easier to learn on an electric because the strings are much easier to press and if it wont sound as bad when you mess up because of distortion.

LuckyR
12-23-2008, 05:45 PM
What genre of music are you into? I would not get a guitar to "learn" with. I would get a guitar that is consistant with the music I like, then learn to play it.

max
12-23-2008, 06:30 PM
Acoustics make such a more nice sound, too! There are a good many low-priced but good-sounding acoustic options out there.

In my meek experience, it's better to move to an electric after you've learned on an acoustic. Develop fewer bad habits.

vmosrafa08
12-23-2008, 07:13 PM
i'm into classic rock... i'm probably going to get an acoustic, but now i have a couple of questions. Should I get a fender? And if I want to learn how to play it by myself, what is the best tape/ course (i'll get a teacher later)?

BigBUBBA
12-23-2008, 07:22 PM
Go with acoustic. More accesible, you can pick up most any song w/ an acoustic, they are cheaper, and to me the sound quality is unrivaled.

~Bubbs

SirBlend12
12-23-2008, 07:26 PM
i'm into classic rock... i'm probably going to get an acoustic, but now i have a couple of questions. Should I get a fender? And if I want to learn how to play it by myself, what is the best tape/ course (i'll get a teacher later)?

Honestly, I would suggest NOT getting a teacher. For the most part, music lessons are trash unless you're a classical musician (so many nuances, learning composition, orchestration, etc.). Your best bet is to buy some books that interest you (songs to learn, how to read music, scale books) and teach yourself. Learning from someone else almost always ends badly. Playing an instrument isn't like learning a good backhand. You really have to find your own way to play because the variance is so great. Listen to songs you like while hitting on the fret board to find the right note. Don't think about it. Just wait until you hear it. That's how you learn to recognize pitches and harmony. Practice scales of all types, training your fingers to move in patterns, sometimes hard and wide, sometimes close and precise. Read all the books you can about music. Half of playing is your muscle memory and how you make your hands work, and half is knowing how to hear music and convert it into the first part. Understanding theory leads to understanding practice leads to understanding and committing to performance. It all takes time, but if you have the knack for a method, you'll be playing just fine in no time.

jrod
12-23-2008, 08:02 PM
Honestly, I would suggest NOT getting a teacher. For the most part, music lessons are trash unless you're a classical musician (so many nuances, learning composition, orchestration, etc.). Your best bet is to buy some books that interest you (songs to learn, how to read music, scale books) and teach yourself. Learning from someone else almost always ends badly. Playing an instrument isn't like learning a good backhand. You really have to find your own way to play because the variance is so great. Listen to songs you like while hitting on the fret board to find the right note. Don't think about it. Just wait until you hear it. That's how you learn to recognize pitches and harmony. Practice scales of all types, training your fingers to move in patterns, sometimes hard and wide, sometimes close and precise. Read all the books you can about music. Half of playing is your muscle memory and how you make your hands work, and half is knowing how to hear music and convert it into the first part. Understanding theory leads to understanding practice leads to understanding and committing to performance. It all takes time, but if you have the knack for a method, you'll be playing just fine in no time.

I've played guitar for over 25 years, 10+ professionally and I can honestly say that this is the absolute WORST advice you could possibly get.

SirBlend12 is either a clueless prodigy or is simply clueless.

vmosrafa08
12-23-2008, 08:14 PM
so, can you give me some advice on how to begin learning the acoustic guitar, jrod?

SirBlend12
12-23-2008, 09:00 PM
I've played guitar for over 25 years, 10+ professionally and I can honestly say that this is the absolute WORST advice you could possibly get.

SirBlend12 is either a clueless prodigy or is simply clueless.

Thanks, buddy. You putting words on a page OBVIOUSLY means you're qualified.

As for prodigy, I did start playing when I was 3, self-taught...:)

RestockingTues
12-23-2008, 09:08 PM
Get an acoustic! The girls absolutely LOVE it :lol:

RestockingTues
12-23-2008, 09:09 PM
Thanks, buddy. You putting words on a page OBVIOUSLY means you're qualified.

As for prodigy, I did start playing when I was 3, self-taught...:)

Ouch jrod, megawhooped. You have to play a grudge match with him now to redeem your honor!

SirBlend12
12-23-2008, 09:13 PM
Ouch jrod, megawhooped. You have to play a grudge match with him now to redeem your honor!

I'm not picking a fight, I'm just saying different strokes for different folks. Not everyone handles the whole "lesson" thing very well. Some are better left to gain their own knowledge their own way.

RestockingTues
12-23-2008, 09:34 PM
I'm not picking a fight, I'm just saying different strokes for different folks. Not everyone handles the whole "lesson" thing very well. Some are better left to gain their own knowledge their own way.

I think you're right. I figured out how to play tennis by myself and I'm loads better than those rich upper middle class punks at my school with coaches :) Not that I'm very good anyways :?

SirBlend12
12-23-2008, 09:47 PM
I think you're right. I figured out how to play tennis by myself and I'm loads better than those rich upper middle class punks at my school with coaches :) Not that I'm very good anyways :?

With time and practice, good things will surely come, my friend:)

jrod
12-24-2008, 05:24 AM
Thanks, buddy. You putting words on a page OBVIOUSLY means you're qualified.

As for prodigy, I did start playing when I was 3, self-taught...:)


Ok, lets assume (at least until you post a clip of you playing on utube) that you actually are a "prodigy"...do you honestly believe that someone who might not be as "gifted" as you would not benefit from instruction?

I don't disagree with much of what you said about listening and figuring out things for yourself. This is definitely an important part of learning. However, a qualified instructor can help a great deal in many different aspects (from technique to tone to theory to improvisation to mastery). It all depends on how you want to proceed. Oh, just because you are receiving instruction doesn't meam you can't find your own voice in the process of learning. Usually that takes years of experimenting and playing with a number of other musicians.

Let us know when you get that clip posted...

SlapShot
12-24-2008, 05:45 AM
Get a guitar you feel comfortable playing. It doesn't have to be acoustic or electric - buy one that is consistent with the type of music you see yourself playing once you've learned to play.

Acoustics can be much more difficult to learn on due to (generally) having thicker necks and heavier strings. You also don't need an amp to learn on electric guitar - I don't plug in my electrics unless I'm at band practice. I don't see the point - once you get used to a tube amp turned up loud, plugging in to play quiet seems silly.

jrod
12-24-2008, 06:00 AM
so, can you give me some advice on how to begin learning the acoustic guitar, jrod?

I think starting with an acoustic is the right way to go, for the reasons cited above. There are lots of decent manufacturers of acoustic guitars and you should probably do a little research on them to see which ones represent the best value for someone starting out. For your genre of music, a steel stringed acoustic is probably than a nylon strung one.

You should also look at what options you have for receiving instruction in your area. Try and find someone who can make things fun and inspire you. The initial stages of learning the guitar can be very frustrating and technical, with much focus on technique and such. It helps to be learning material that you enjoy playing.

It's also vital to connect with other musicians, even if they prefer to play different genre than you. The entire musical creative process is enriched through interaction with others, and many important musical genres were born from collaborative efforts spanning different cultures, styles, instrumentation, etc.

As others have suggested, you should also pursue learning tunes on your own. In my days, we had to transfer vinyl recordings to tape to make it more convenient to learn tunes (replay, etc), but these days this entire process is so much easier. Depending on your financial resources, there are probably lots of good computer-based instructional aides that you can exploit. There are even recordings that allow instrument tracks to be nulled out so that you can "sit" in.

It's been years since I was fully engaged in the trade, but when I left it I was into all aspects of the electronic tools (midi controllers, home studio recording, etc.). I was astounded at how much easier producing your own music was becoming. This is evident today with many artists able to produce their work for very little $. This kind of thing was next to impossible when I was getting into the business.

Good luck with your endeavors and enjoy!

Nickk
12-24-2008, 06:15 AM
an acoustic will build and require finger stregth, you will learn to fret chords with better technique starting with an acoustic.

I think lessons are a good route since you'll have someone to make sure your technique is good. Once you have a good base to work from decide if you want to continue. Lessons will only help you learn more quickly so I would say unless you're hindered financially then take them.

vmosrafa08
12-24-2008, 11:33 AM
Yeah, eventually I will take lessons, but how should I start out in the beginning? There are some books and tapes for starting - should I look into those?

zacinnc78
12-24-2008, 01:16 PM
to simply answer your question....an electric guitar is EASIER to play because the strings are spaced closer together and also closer to the fretboard and the frets are usually shorter so less pressing down

plus with an electric you can make clean sounds AND distorted rock sounds

an acoustic is cool too u cant beat that kind of clean tone but i would go with elctric if you are a rocker anyway

stormholloway
12-24-2008, 02:06 PM
Just pick whatever you want. Ultimately, you will decide to pawn the thing or not. Pick what you find most fun to play to spurn interest early on.

For the record, my first guitar was a Mexican strat. It was a great decision.

beckham
12-24-2008, 02:07 PM
I'd suggest an acoustic guitar!

fuzz nation
12-24-2008, 06:46 PM
After irking my roommate in school by borrowing his acoustic so much, I finally got my own guitar, but I got an electric. On their own, basic electric guitars don't cost more than acoustics - actually, really cheap acoustics are horrible. The thing with electrics is that you pretty much need to play them through something to hear them, but little practice amps or multi-effects gizmos with headphone jacks are also pretty cheap. I got an electric because it was more fun and I wanted to use it more often at the outset. Eventually, I got an acoustic, too and I loved to play both.

If you shop some second hand stuff, you'll find plenty of options. Make sure that you sit and noodle with the thing for a while before you take it home and if it's an electric, put it on a strap and make sure that it feels okay. Yeah, I know that you're just starting out, but if you hold a couple of different guitars, you'll get to feel the different neck shapes and layouts. You want a good fit just the same as with a tennis racquet.

If I were starting out today, I'd look for a book with an accompanying DVD so that I could learn good techniques right away instead of having to unlearn bad ones later. Flip through some books and grab one or two that seem easy enough to follow at first glance off the shelf. Pretty much you'll want to learn some notes, chords, and a little theory so that you know how they go together. A lot of playing is also about just "woodshedding" and using your ears as you get more comfortable getting around on the neck.

It's not a huge commitment, but if you want to shift your learning into a higher gear, consider a teacher, but think of this person in the same way you'd look at a tennis pro. You want to click with them in a comfortable setting where you're okay with messing up along the way and you also don't want to be pressured into signing up for a big bundle of classes right away. I found an easy going and vastly experienced professional when I decided to do some private study on the bass (I made the switch a while back). It was the one best thing I've done for my playing - he had a knack for balancing our work on theory and technique with the fun stuff which was learning songs. The more you play, the more you'll discover that we're all in the business of stealing ideas from each other along the way as we get better.

game set match 46 TIMES!!
12-24-2008, 06:48 PM
i started on a electric. there very fun. Acoustic arent fun at all! use the electric.

Djokovicfan4life
12-25-2008, 06:48 AM
Honestly, I would suggest NOT getting a teacher. For the most part, music lessons are trash unless you're a classical musician (so many nuances, learning composition, orchestration, etc.). Your best bet is to buy some books that interest you (songs to learn, how to read music, scale books) and teach yourself. Learning from someone else almost always ends badly. Playing an instrument isn't like learning a good backhand. You really have to find your own way to play because the variance is so great. Listen to songs you like while hitting on the fret board to find the right note. Don't think about it. Just wait until you hear it. That's how you learn to recognize pitches and harmony. Practice scales of all types, training your fingers to move in patterns, sometimes hard and wide, sometimes close and precise. Read all the books you can about music. Half of playing is your muscle memory and how you make your hands work, and half is knowing how to hear music and convert it into the first part. Understanding theory leads to understanding practice leads to understanding and committing to performance. It all takes time, but if you have the knack for a method, you'll be playing just fine in no time.

I don't know if you just had bad teachers or something, but I can say that I'm very happy with all or the lessons I've had over the past few years. The best part about having a teacher is that he or she can point out what the student is doing wrong when a problem arises. Without anyone to guide them, players can simply struggle for hours on end, only to create bad habits that will be very hard to break later on.

To the OP, if you like classic rock, then I would suggest that you buy an electric guitar. They're much easier to play, which you will be very grateful for once you start developing those first callouses. If you choose a Fender, make sure to buy one with a humbucking pickup in the bridge. This is absolutely critical to getting a fatter sound out of your guitar for rhythm playing.

The most important thing to remember is that to make progress on an instrument, you have to learn how to practice efficiently. As some people say, practice doesn't make perfect, perfect practice makes perfect. Again, this is where a teacher really helps. Most players don't have the knowledge or the discipline to practice properly, so they end up just hacking away at that Enter Sandman intro about 100 times and then call it a day.

You need to have an idea of what you want to accomplish before you begin each practice session, whether it be learning a song that you like, or mastering a new scale, or whatever. You will make so much more progress with 30 minutes a day of quality practice time then you will with 5 hours day of screwing around. I'm not saying that there isn't a time for screwing around, but you won't get anywhere on the guitar if that's all you do.

Hope this helps,

Matt

Z-Man
12-25-2008, 05:36 PM
Get an acoustic. If you have a friend who is a good player who knows what to look for, take him with you when you buy the guitar. Check the neck--does it have a slight curve like it should? Is it bowed? Are the frets filed smooth? Tune it up and check the intonation--if a string is tuned properly, is it also in tune when fretted at the 12th fret? Bring a capo. Does it sound in tune when capo'd? These are the sorts of things a friend can check for if you know someone who can help you. If I were you, I'd look for a used, but good condition Larrivee D3. That might set you back about $500-$600. Fender, Alvarez, Yamaha, etc all make decent starter guitars, but be sure to check the action. If the strings are too high, it will be tought to learn. I'd also recommend Elixir strings. They are pricey, but not too bad if you get them from musiciansfriend.com. Your fingers will glide easier, and you'll learn faster.

mental midget
12-25-2008, 06:10 PM
haven't read through the entire thread, so, apologies for any redundancies, but my two cents:

get an acoustic, you'll get a better feel for the instrument that is the guitar. low action, light strings, not too physically demanding. harder than an electric, but it's not a big deal.

as for learning, it all depends on your goals. if you want to learn a bunch of songs, chords, etc., this is all easy to learn on your own.

however, if you want to really learn your instrument, know exactly what it is you're doing with the thing rather than parroting back patterns and positions--basically, if you want to be a musician--and are willing to invest some time--there is so substitute for a professional teacher.

i poked around on my own for a few years, but eventually wound up studying jazz guitar under a real legend here in town. meteoric learning curve, extremely demanding, but without question one of the best investments of my life.

SirBlend12
12-25-2008, 08:09 PM
Ok, lets assume (at least until you post a clip of you playing on utube) that you actually are a "prodigy"...do you honestly believe that someone who might not be as "gifted" as you would not benefit from instruction?

I don't disagree with much of what you said about listening and figuring out things for yourself. This is definitely an important part of learning. However, a qualified instructor can help a great deal in many different aspects (from technique to tone to theory to improvisation to mastery). It all depends on how you want to proceed. Oh, just because you are receiving instruction doesn't meam you can't find your own voice in the process of learning. Usually that takes years of experimenting and playing with a number of other musicians.

Let us know when you get that clip posted...

I have nothing to prove to you. My personal accomplishments are proof enough whether you know them or not. Hell, how do I even know that you're of any merit to ask this of me? I made a simple statement to try and assist the OP, and you made a random attack on it, instead of making your own comments on what you feel he should do.

If you are confident in your own ability and knowledge, then why even acknowledge and question mine?

Teachers work for some people. They don't for others. I simply learned via my own method of "observe and experiment". All I had suggested was a different perspective that could have made sense for someone else.

There was no need for petty condescension.

Drewwonu
12-25-2008, 09:54 PM
I would personally recommend you NOT to get lessons when you start. Teach yourself. Lessons can be boring and you can easily loose interest in no time. Learning sheet music music can be devastatingly boring and destroy your interest if you are not already in love with the instrument.
I would do these steps to begin your life with guitar.

1) buy an acoustic guitar
-Why?- It will build your finger strength and will teach you how to play clean. If you play electric with distortion or overdrive you can easily play a song like **** and it will sound fine.
2) learn how to read tabs
-Why?- Learning tabs should be your first step when you pick up a guitar. This will allow you to learn songs that interest YOU! This creates a fun atmosphere and will keep you coming back for more wanting to learn more tunes!
3) once you play for a while after having some fun, learn some chords and basic theory.

jrod
12-26-2008, 05:01 AM
I have nothing to prove to you. My personal accomplishments are proof enough whether you know them or not. Hell, how do I even know that you're of any merit to ask this of me?

I see now SirBlend...so we all need to be "of merit" in order to qualify questioning your advice.

I made a simple statement to try and assist the OP, and you made a random attack on it, instead of making your own comments on what you feel he should do.

Your advice to the OP was utter nonsense. I simply called you on it. It wasn't random at all.

If you are confident in your own ability and knowledge, then why even acknowledge and question mine?

You're mistaken. I didn't question you.

Teachers work for some people. They don't for others. I simply learned via my own method of "observe and experiment". All I had suggested was a different perspective that could have made sense for someone else.

Perfectly valid for you according to you. My 25+ years of observing and working with folks who are engaged in the arts is that all received some form of instruction in their careers. The point is, you learn more through collaboration and good instruction is just one form of this.

There was no need for petty condescension.

From your responses here, it certainly appears that you are not one who would benefit from constructive criticism of any form, so I can understand your apprehension to seek the advice of professional instructors or others who might actually have something to offer you (like a different opinion).

Best of luck with you musical endeavors. You'll most certainly need it with that kind of attitude.

vmosrafa08
12-26-2008, 07:29 PM
Right now I'm looking into an acoustic-electric guitar (by Fender). One of the cheapest guitars is a dreadnought guitar. I wasn't sure what this meant, so I looked it up. Dreadnought guitars tend to be bigger than normal guitars. Is this what most people use, or do people use normal size guitars?

stormholloway
12-27-2008, 05:46 AM
I have a dreadnought. It's just a bigger body acoustic. It's not going to affect the way it's played. It just sounds different.

vmosrafa08
12-27-2008, 06:31 AM
would you suggest getting a dreadnought or a regular sized acoustic guitar, storm?

Tofi
12-27-2008, 06:59 AM
I first learnt on an acoustic guitar but when i was 11 going onto 12 years old i went on to play the electric guitar. i quit after that year as i couldnt be bothered with it. but the best way to learn is acoustic and then electric after afew years playing acoustic. btw some chords you play in songs on the guitar go very fast or are a long way apart or both and take a long time to practise so you have to have atleast an hour a day to practise them.

vmosrafa08
12-27-2008, 08:42 AM
would you suggest getting a dreadnought or a regular sized acoustic guitar, storm?

No, but really, dreadnought or regular acoustic guitar guys?

vmosrafa08
12-27-2008, 09:48 AM
I'm about to get a guitar in a few hours, so does anybody have last-minute advice about a couple of things...

-dreadnought guitars
-curve in the guitar's neck
-brands/guitars
-how to begin (tabs/books/videos--youtube??)
-anything else

Tofi
12-27-2008, 09:57 AM
get guitar teacher it will help alot. also i hear gibsons are good and yamaha are also good so go for one of those makes.

max
12-27-2008, 11:31 AM
A dreadnought is pretty much the standard acoustic guitar shape. It is extremely versatile: good for strumming, flatpicking and fingerpicking. Once you get more advanced, you might want to pick up another one or two guitars for specialized purposes.

I think earlier I advised starting on acoustic. I stick by that advice. And go steel-string, not nylon. It used to be standard advice to get people playing nylon strings because they're easy on your left hand fingers. . . but wider string spacing means chords are much more difficult, and there are other drawbacks as well.

A good inexpensive make is Walden. Another is Blueridge. I'd steer clear of inexpensive Fenders (Fender's reputation has always been electric, never acoustic guitars), Hohners and Epiphones (I once liked the Epi knock-off of the J-200, but, Lord!, you can pick up 10 of these and get a different sound out of each!). I like the Guild GAD line in particular, nice appointments and sound, made at the same Chinese factory as the Blueridge.

And yes, a guitar teacher is a good way to go. I'd suggest half-hour as opposed to hour long lessons, just to help with focus. Buy a ton of book as well; music you like, and check out ultimateguitar.com for music and instructional articles.

max
12-27-2008, 11:33 AM
Picking one out, make sure the action is good. . . that the strings don't lie too high off the fretboard, so high you can't play. . . or so low that you get buzzing.

Pick up a tuner, a strap, make sure you get the case. Most guitar deals are DEALS; you're expected to offer $50 less than they propose. Save money by offering a bit less. Or, to save your pride, make them throw in a set of strings.

FlamEnemY
12-27-2008, 11:33 AM
http://www.fender.com/products//search.php?partno=0960620221

I bought this Fender and I'm very pleased with it - very warm and clean sound, plus you can easily plug it in the computer and add effects.
Dreadnought probably doesn't make a lot of difference, however I suppose a normal guitar will be easier to hold/travel with.

A good teacher can help alot. However, it may be a good idea to try some songs yourself, be it even with tabs and videos. But tabs are for wannabes, this isn't how songs should be played.
Sheet music, chord construction and scales are the real thing.

There are many videos on youtube and such sites - you can easily find what is most interesting for you.

vmosrafa08
12-27-2008, 08:50 PM
I didn't get a guitar, but I got to play a few...

-I really liked a Ibanez guitar, and it was pretty cheap
-I tried only one Fender guitar, and it wasn't so good
-I tried a few Gibson guitars, but they all cost over a thousand dollars.
-I tried a Dean guitar that was pretty cheap, but I didn't like it

In most of the guitars that I tried, I found that they rattled (I think that the strings were too close to the guitar) but then I don't know much about guitars. Any advice?

SirBlend12
12-27-2008, 09:19 PM
I see now SirBlend...so we all need to be "of merit" in order to qualify questioning your advice.



Your advice to the OP was utter nonsense. I simply called you on it. It wasn't random at all.



You're mistaken. I didn't question you.



Perfectly valid for you according to you. My 25+ years of observing and working with folks who are engaged in the arts is that all received some form of instruction in their careers. The point is, you learn more through collaboration and good instruction is just one form of this.



From your responses here, it certainly appears that you are not one who would benefit from constructive criticism of any form, so I can understand your apprehension to seek the advice of professional instructors or others who might actually have something to offer you (like a different opinion).

Best of luck with you musical endeavors. You'll most certainly need it with that kind of attitude.

1. Apparently so.

2. Maybe to you. Maybe not to him.

3. Yeah, you did. Or did you forget your first post?

4. Reading scales and scores, listening to various artists and researching styles, practicing in the scrutiny of others isn't a form of instruction? Just because some didn't "administer" it doesn't mean it isn't instruction.

5. Your doing it again. I try to put this to rest and yet you persist in trying to make me some d-bag loud mouth ego-bubble. Stop it. Knock it off. I didn't respond in any sort of way and you damn well know it. You don't think for a second that maybe you're wrong? Or that your so intent on being right that you would attack another poster? My attitude is fine because I've worked my *** off for what I've achieved and what I can be proud of, and there isn't one person that knows me who would say any different. It's more so a shame that you would sooner harass someone over a disagreement than look at your own work in the same light and leave your advice to the OP as such.

I hope I've made myself clear. Best of luck.

P.S. If you don't have anything mildly respectful to say to this, then just don't say anything. I'm trying to be civil and thus far you have chosen to be anything but.

max
12-28-2008, 05:47 PM
You know, OP, it's hard to provide much more specific advice unless you offer what your budget range is. I would recommend planning to spend about $500 for a good acoustic. Check out the Blueridge BR40s and BR60s, the Guild GAD 50s, the new Johnson Carolina and REcording King line. The Epiphone Masterbilt series is a very nice, eloquent looking, good sounding bunch of guitars in this range as well.

Note that there is a difference in music stores: some sell acoustics just in addition to the electric guitars they emphasize; others take the time to develop their acoustic room; it's more than an afterthought. Guitar Centers stock the Epiphone Masterbilt stuff, and perhaps that's a good direction to take.

There's a lot to be said for popping for a teacher to help get you going. This might save you a year or two of otherwise aimless, directionless noodling. I have extensively searched for good YouTube guitar instructional videos and they almost always come up lacking. I don't think there anything at all wrong with tab. ONe major thing that made the difference with my playing was finding out that it's okay to play by ear, to some extent, and that this goes along with knowing the written music.

jrod
12-29-2008, 05:15 AM
In most of the guitars that I tried, I found that they rattled (I think that the strings were too close to the guitar) but then I don't know much about guitars. Any advice?

In most (if not all) guitars, there is a truss rod in the neck that can be used to adjust the action (i.e. the bow in the neck that separates the strings from the fretboard). The adjustment is usually accessable at the tuning head of most instruments. Some electric instruments (e.g. some electric fenders) provide access to the rod where the neck attaches to the body on teh backside of the body. In many electric guitars (and possibly some acoustic) the bridge provides some degree of adjustment on a per string basis. Usually these are set by the manufacturer but over time they will need to be readjusted so that you don't have issues with string buzz anywhere on the fretboard.

I wouldn't recommend adjusting things in an adhoc manner as it can throw off intonation and possibly damage the instrument. I managed to break a truss rod in a '69 Gibson ES150 and the repairs were substantial (removed fretboard, replace truss rod, replace fretboard). If there is any buzzing make sure you get someone qualified to make the adjustment and show you how its done for future reference.

max
12-29-2008, 10:35 AM
OP: if you have any question, just send me an email; I'd be happy to help.

vmosrafa08
12-29-2008, 11:58 AM
You know, OP, it's hard to provide much more specific advice unless you offer what your budget range is. I would recommend planning to spend about $500 for a good acoustic. Check out the Blueridge BR40s and BR60s, the Guild GAD 50s, the new Johnson Carolina and REcording King line. The Epiphone Masterbilt series is a very nice, eloquent looking, good sounding bunch of guitars in this range as well.

Note that there is a difference in music stores: some sell acoustics just in addition to the electric guitars they emphasize; others take the time to develop their acoustic room; it's more than an afterthought. Guitar Centers stock the Epiphone Masterbilt stuff, and perhaps that's a good direction to take.

There's a lot to be said for popping for a teacher to help get you going. This might save you a year or two of otherwise aimless, directionless noodling. I have extensively searched for good YouTube guitar instructional videos and they almost always come up lacking. I don't think there anything at all wrong with tab. ONe major thing that made the difference with my playing was finding out that it's okay to play by ear, to some extent, and that this goes along with knowing the written music.

Yeah my budget isn't as big as $500...It's up to three hundred dollars. I'm not going to spend a lot of money on my first guitar. The Ibanez guitar that I mentioned costs about 230. Right now I'm trying to decide if I should get the Ibanez guitar or a Fender in the 250 dollar range. I will start out with tabs and videos then I will move on to a teacher...

GPB
12-29-2008, 12:37 PM
When I first picked up a guitar, I had a friend show me about 6 different chords, and how to play a scale. Then I went and picked up tabs and learned some songs.

Have fun with it, and you'll learn.

As far as guitar choice come in, have you had the chance to physically play either of these choices? If you have the opportunity, I'd go to a music store, tell them your price range, and ask them to play a couple guitars for you. Find the one you like the most and fiddle around with it. If it feels like a good fit, then get it!

ps, The dreadnought shape is not to be feared -- it's great!

max
12-29-2008, 01:36 PM
The Ibanez, at least around here, would have better resale value down the road. With respect to a teacher, do take your time and ask around before getting one. Get one who communicates well; that's important. A chord chart or book is a great thing, and check out ultimateguitar.com for chords and/or tab. I've used a couple of instructional DVDs which are very nice, Homespun Video produced. I wish there was a better market for used instructional videos, since that would make it more financially possible to run through a lot of them (I tried to sell a flatpicking DVD but had minimal response).

With respect to guitar shape, the dreadnought's the basic workhorse. Maybe something smaller if you're going to focus on fingerpicking. Smaller guitars often sound lousy when strummed. In your price range, consider the Art & Lutherie makes as well as the Walden.

Ben42
12-30-2008, 08:47 AM
Yeah my budget isn't as big as $500...It's up to three hundred dollars. I'm not going to spend a lot of money on my first guitar. The Ibanez guitar that I mentioned costs about 230. Right now I'm trying to decide if I should get the Ibanez guitar or a Fender in the 250 dollar range. I will start out with tabs and videos then I will move on to a teacher...


Which Ibaniez? I played around with an AEL10 yesterday and liked it pretty well. It doesn't have a solid top, but if it sounds good, do I care? I do like the built in tuner. I might want to replace my super el-cheapo Fender acoustic I have now.

vmosrafa08
12-30-2008, 08:51 AM
It's a Ibanez EW20AS Acoustic Guitar. I found it to be a good guitar, and the reviews are great...

vmosrafa08
12-30-2008, 02:06 PM
Which Ibaniez? I played around with an AEL10 yesterday and liked it pretty well. It doesn't have a solid top, but if it sounds good, do I care? I do like the built in tuner. I might want to replace my super el-cheapo Fender acoustic I have now.

I hate the Squier brand that Fender makes...it looks so cheap