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View Full Version : What to focus on when playing my NTRP 6.0 friend


IvanAndreevich
12-27-2008, 11:48 PM
Alright, so I've been playing for around 1.5 years and I believe I am NTRP 4.5 (with some caveats), based on what I saw on youtube etc.

I have a friend who is now a professional fencer (just outside top 100 in the world). Before he decided to train to be a professional fencer he was going to be a professional tennis player. He was a junior champion of this province at some point.

Here's the deal. I have no chance of beating the guy, or currently keeping it competitive against him. For some reason, he's glad to play me, even though he's beating me 6-0 or 6-1 every time.

I can't keep my composure when playing with him, it really takes me out of my comfort zone. If we just rally, I can often WIN a rally against him, but in a match play situation I don't have the confidence to go after those shots.

My return of serve is generally poor and his serve is good so I can rarely make an impact on his service games. If I try to chip the return, he whips a winner. If I try to go for the return, I can't make it.

I can play an all court game against other opponents but I have never been successfull coming to net against this guy. He actually just gives me easy balls (float slices) and I screw them up completely.

The only way I can get points is by getting my first serves in, and that's currently a low percentage shot. Second serve is currently not good enough. If I give an easy one, I lose the point. If I go after it I double fault a lot.

I have strokes which can win points against him, but they are not dependable enough in a match situation. I played him yesterday and missed my down the line backhand more than half the time - one of my favorite shots.

What I have -
1) Good 2HBH (flat) and I can crack it.
2) Good forehand, except I can't defend well with it. I am working on making the stroke more compact.
3) Average volleys (which I love playing, so I am practicing them)
4) Average anticipation.
5) Good fitness level and athletic ability.
6) Poor serve receive :(

Questions
1) How can I make it more fun and interesting for him?
2) What should I do to extract the most out of playing him for myself? Go for broke? Go for easy shots? Try to come in? Try to bring him in?
3) Any way to practice serve receive on your own?

What I plan to do
1) Develop the second serve variety and dependability
2) Increase first serve percentage
3) Try to relax and take it easy and be comfortable - I am not playing for my last socks anyway

PS I played a set against a ~4.0 player today. I think my serve brought him out of his comfort level, and although I played like **** I beat him 6-3.

xtremerunnerars
12-28-2008, 12:13 AM
Maybe try playing where he only gets 1 serve per point?


You're not going to be able to get more than a game from him if he's >=6.0 plain and simple. Whatever you do though, don't push. That doesn't necessarily mean go for broke, but certainly don't "just get it in." Take full swings and see what happens.

hellonewbie
12-28-2008, 12:23 AM
First of all, to be blunt, I am guessing you're probably a good 3.5 after 1.5 years of playing, but not yet 4.5, so there's considerable gap between you two's skill levels. Ratings aside, if your friend is able to put you away easily, it really doesn't matter what you do, he's going to have fun dishing it out to you :-) You should figure out why you screw up the easy balls, once you've got some better consistency, you'll make a better match for your friend.

You're very lucky your friend is willing to play with you, I would recommend you use the times of playing him to see if you can work in some new swing mechanics, new strategies, etc. into match play. You should have 0 pressure while playing your friend because you should have no expectation of beating him. You should focus on observing if your own game has improved facing his shots, what works, what doesn't, etc.

By the way, you shouldn't think about winning practice rallies, instead try to keep the balls in play and improve your consistency. Obviously your friend can put you away anytime he wishes, it's not very good practice etiquette when he's feeding you good balls while you try to put them away during a practice rally.

IvanAndreevich
12-28-2008, 01:14 AM
First of all, to be blunt, I am guessing you're probably a good 3.5 after 1.5 years of playing, but not yet 4.5, so there's considerable gap between you two's skill levels. Ratings aside, if your friend is able to put you away easily, it really doesn't matter what you do, he's going to have fun dishing it out to you :-) You should figure out why you screw up the easy balls, once you've got some better consistency, you'll make a better match for your friend.

You're very lucky your friend is willing to play with you, I would recommend you use the times of playing him to see if you can work in some new swing mechanics, new strategies, etc. into match play. You should have 0 pressure while playing your friend because you should have no expectation of beating him. You should focus on observing if your own game has improved facing his shots, what works, what doesn't, etc.

By the way, you shouldn't think about winning practice rallies, instead try to keep the balls in play and improve your consistency. Obviously your friend can put you away anytime he wishes, it's not very good practice etiquette when he's feeding you good balls while you try to put them away during a practice rally.
I think I am a 4.5. My athletic credentials are really helping me along. You can say I am a 6.0 volleyball player (although, of course, there are no NTRP ratings for vball). Which is why my first serve is well over 100 mph (same motion) :)

Is this guy a 4.5? http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mAzzulyqrWw&feature=PlayList&p=48F69AB4B785F6DB&playnext=1&index=4 I could probably beat him. I have way way harder ground strokes and serve, but I make more errors, of course. He has better volleys. I have much better movement and overall fitness. These guys 4.5's? http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9mZsmydAIVE

I have other 4.0-5.0 friends, but we usually just hit and not play actual matches or sets. Perhaps that's why I fail so miserably. I must admit I have very little actual match practice, but hundreds of hours of hitting under my belt.

No he isn't feeding me easy balls. We just hit. He's kinda going for his shots and so am I (probably more than him, of course). I can stay with him as long as I am controlling the point, which I have the ability to. I just don't have the consistency or confidence to do it in a match :(

xtremerunnerars
I was just thinking about that, actually. That way I'd have more of a chance on the return, and that would put a bit of pressure on his serve as well.

[I am going to Mexico. Back in a week! All input appreciated]

hellonewbie
12-28-2008, 01:29 AM
I can't say for the guys in the video, but usually one shot or two doesn't make you certain rating. As you mentioned, there's a lot of match experience involved as well. The guy may not have pretty shots, but he can win and that's what counts in matches. Don't worry about ratings so much, a lot of ratings, especially self-ratings, seem inconsistent and varies from region to region. If you can beat 4.0 player like you said, you are probably closer to 4.0 then. I have played some top 4.5 players, and they seem way better than some 4.5 players I find on craigslist :-)

If your friend is going for shots even in rallies, then yea, go ahead try to go for it. In that situation I sometimes like to just play defense, let the other guy attack and see how well I can move and defend. If they can't crack my defense, the more confidence I have that they can't hurt me in a real match :-)

If you can get the other 4.0-5.0 friends to spar with you in some friendly tie-breaks or games, you could definitely improve leap and bounds in your match toughness.

ximian
12-28-2008, 01:39 AM
No way those guys in those videos are 4.5s. I'd say 4.0 AT BEST. And almost universally, if you've been playing for 1.5 years and are very athletic, you're probably a 3.5. I would assume your "6.0" friend is probably a 4.5 in reality.

jasoncho92
12-28-2008, 02:53 AM
Alright, so I've been playing for around 1.5 years and I believe I am NTRP 4.5 (with some caveats), based on what I saw on youtube etc.

I have a friend who is now a professional fencer (just outside top 100 in the world). Before he decided to train to be a professional fencer he was going to be a professional tennis player. He was a junior champion of this province at some point.

Here's the deal. I have no chance of beating the guy, or currently keeping it competitive against him. For some reason, he's glad to play me, even though he's beating me 6-0 or 6-1 every time.

I can't keep my composure when playing with him, it really takes me out of my comfort zone. If we just rally, I can often WIN a rally against him, but in a match play situation I don't have the confidence to go after those shots.

My return of serve is generally poor and his serve is good so I can rarely make an impact on his service games. If I try to chip the return, he whips a winner. If I try to go for the return, I can't make it.

I can play an all court game against other opponents but I have never been successfull coming to net against this guy. He actually just gives me easy balls (float slices) and I screw them up completely.

The only way I can get points is by getting my first serves in, and that's currently a low percentage shot. Second serve is currently not good enough. If I give an easy one, I lose the point. If I go after it I double fault a lot.

I have strokes which can win points against him, but they are not dependable enough in a match situation. I played him yesterday and missed my down the line backhand more than half the time - one of my favorite shots.

What I have -
1) Good 2HBH (flat) and I can crack it.
2) Good forehand, except I can't defend well with it. I am working on making the stroke more compact.
3) Average volleys (which I love playing, so I am practicing them)
4) Average anticipation.
5) Good fitness level and athletic ability.
6) Poor serve receive :(

Questions
1) How can I make it more fun and interesting for him?
2) What should I do to extract the most out of playing him for myself? Go for broke? Go for easy shots? Try to come in? Try to bring him in?
3) Any way to practice serve receive on your own?

What I plan to do
1) Develop the second serve variety and dependability
2) Increase first serve percentage
3) Try to relax and take it easy and be comfortable - I am not playing for my last socks anyway

PS I played a set against a ~4.0 player today. I think my serve brought him out of his comfort level, and although I played like **** I beat him 6-3.
I wont get into your NTRP rating since i have nothing to go by although i dont think you are a 4.5 because when you see guys on youtube, they are usually over rating themselves or look a lot worse than they actually are, but i have a hard time believing that your friend is actually a 6.0 but decided to not go with tennis. Im guessing that he is a 5.5 at best if he decided against tennis early enough to become that good at fencing.

IvanAndreevich
12-28-2008, 05:10 AM
Mmmm... seems like many people would be really unhappy if I was a 4.5.

This is not a thread about "what my NTRP rating is". What I am saying is: if I am a 4.5, my friend is a 6.0. If you call that 4.0 and 5.5 respectively, what difference does that make?

I am still playing a much better opponent, which I want to extract something out of.

jrod
12-28-2008, 05:25 AM
Mmmm... seems like many people would be really unhappy if I was a 4.5.

This is not a thread about "what my NTRP rating is". What I am saying is: if I am a 4.5, my friend is a 6.0. If you call that 4.0 and 5.5 respectively, what difference does that make?

I am still playing a much better opponent, which I want to extract something out of.

ok, lets keep it simple then. assuming you are a 4.5 and your buddy is a 6.0 it makes absolutely no difference what strategy you adopt. you stand NO chance of winning and stand a snowballs chance in hell of winning more than a couple of games. a 6.0 will crush a 4.5 player every single time.

Matty G
12-28-2008, 05:32 AM
When you are returning try mix up were you are standing. I often stand 2 - 2.5 meters inside the baseline when returning big servers. I only do this when they are getting in a grove with there serve though. Doing this makes them try go for a bigger serve and often miss and start hitting doubles. Just mix it up. Also try serve and volley every once and agen. I like doing this by hitting a big kicker to there backhand.

go13illy
12-28-2008, 06:35 AM
1) How can I make it more fun and interesting for him?

I think just playing him would make it fun and interesting for him because it's usually more fun when playing friends than strangers.

2) What should I do to extract the most out of playing him for myself? Go for broke? Go for easy shots? Try to come in? Try to bring him in?

Try working on variety and consistency. Also work on setting up for your shots.

3) Any way to practice serve receive on your own?

no

Djokovicfan4life
12-28-2008, 06:59 AM
I have other 4.0-5.0 friends, but we usually just hit and not play actual matches or sets. Perhaps that's why I fail so miserably. I must admit I have very little actual match practice, but hundreds of hours of hitting under my belt.


You have 5.0 friends that you play with? You do realize that 95% of the tennis playing population never reach the 5.0 level, right? And yet, you seem to have found hitting partners who are 5.0s, but only like to hit around when they play? That doesn't sound like something a 5.0 player would like to do.

I've got to call BS on this poster, sorry.

IvanAndreevich
12-28-2008, 06:59 AM
ok, lets keep it simple then. assuming you are a 4.5 and your buddy is a 6.0 it makes absolutely no difference what strategy you adopt. you stand NO chance of winning and stand a snowballs chance in hell of winning more than a couple of games. a 6.0 will crush a 4.5 player every single time.

I knew that already, Einstein :lol: That doesn't mean I shouldn't still try to get something out of it.

Matty G
Unfortunately, I don't have a kick serve yet. However, if I get my first serve in there is often a very easy floaty slice reply. I try to come in for that but I haven't been effective - he always tends to put it at an uncomfortable place, such as high on the backhand. I guess because it's a big serve rather than a slice or a kicker, it comes back way too fast.

I can try to freak him out Michael Change style, but why bother with that? He is my friend and I need to improve my own game, not test his mental toughness.

ALL
I am going to work for a week 2 hours every day on my serve and strokes against the wall, or if I can find someone to play. My primary focus will be to increase % of first serves in, and reduce the number of double faults. I think my best bet would be to focus on holding serve more often.

IvanAndreevich
12-28-2008, 07:11 AM
You have 5.0 friends that you play with? You do realize that 95% of the tennis playing population never reach the 5.0 level, right? And yet, you seem to have found hitting partners who are 5.0s, but only like to hit around when they play? That doesn't sound like something a 5.0 player would like to do.

I've got to call BS on this poster, sorry.
It's a number, live with it dude. This is not the point of this thread by any stretch of imagination. I am not trying to make some thread to glorify my level from 4.0 to 4.5. I am trying to make a thread to become a better player.

But let me rephrase that for you. I have friends who hit from the baseline at the 4.5-5.0 level. I.e. their strokes fit the description of what those players can do perfectly.

drakulie
12-28-2008, 07:35 AM
If your friend is a 6.0 player, just concentrate on winning winning 5 points in a best of 5 set match. the next time you play him, try to win 6 points. and so-on.

ttbrowne
12-28-2008, 07:36 AM
Yeah, Couple of things that don't sound just right.

"I can stay with him as long as I am controlling the point, which I have the ability to. "

If he is truly a 6.0, he is LETTING you control the point.


"The only way I can get points is by getting my first serves in, and that's currently a low percentage shot."

A 4.5's first serve is not a low percentage shot.

Charlzz
12-28-2008, 07:51 AM
Find a largish woman's outfit, skirt and all, and play in that outfit. Hopefully, the ensuing laughs will disrupt his game enough that he'll play a poor game. In addition, he will be suitably entertained, which was something you said you wanted to do.

PopWar
12-28-2008, 07:56 AM
I would say just focus on trying to win some points
and also post a video :)

mordecai
12-28-2008, 10:21 AM
The main difference above 5.0 is the pace of play and the ability to maintain composed technique at that pace. Don't try to do anything better than you usually do, just try to stay relaxed and execute solid mechanics. You're going to lose, but facing better opponents is a good chance to try to find a groove a step above what you're used to. If you can find a rhythm at that pace, you'll at least have some fun points.

jrod
12-28-2008, 10:50 AM
I knew that already, Einstein :lol: That doesn't mean I shouldn't still try to get something out of it.

Matty G
Unfortunately, I don't have a kick serve yet. However, if I get my first serve in there is often a very easy floaty slice reply. I try to come in for that but I haven't been effective - he always tends to put it at an uncomfortable place, such as high on the backhand. I guess because it's a big serve rather than a slice or a kicker, it comes back way too fast.

I can try to freak him out Michael Change style, but why bother with that? He is my friend and I need to improve my own game, not test his mental toughness.

ALL
I am going to work for a week 2 hours every day on my serve and strokes against the wall, or if I can find someone to play. My primary focus will be to increase % of first serves in, and reduce the number of double faults. I think my best bet would be to focus on holding serve more often.

I think you are blowing smoke...you've said too many things so far that contradict your supposed 4.5 status. I don't know any 4.5 players that don't OWN a good kick serve. Also, all the 4.5 players I know have plenty of hitting partners, including every 4.0 player and most 4.5 players within a 30 mile radius. None hit against a wall to practice. As far as double faults, I'm a weak 4.5 and average 1 double fault per 1.5 sets (thanks to my kick serve). Double faults are not something I ever worry about.

RoddickAce
12-28-2008, 10:52 AM
I would say just focus on trying to win some points
and also post a video :)

I agree with this poster, posting a video will allow us to see the certain styles you two play, and what tactics might be beneficial for you.

Okazaki Fragment
12-28-2008, 11:41 AM
I remember when I was 12 and reading the NTRP guidelines. I thought I was a 5.0.... It's interesting how far off our self-assessments can be.

Anyway, the camera adds 10 pounds and makes you lose 1.0 NTRP. If you think you are a 4.5 based on someone's video, you're probably a 3.5. Which is pretty good for only picking up a raquet 1.5 years ago.

dennis10is
12-28-2008, 12:52 PM
Mmmm... seems like many people would be really unhappy if I was a 4.5.

This is not a thread about "what my NTRP rating is". What I am saying is: if I am a 4.5, my friend is a 6.0. If you call that 4.0 and 5.5 respectively, what difference does that make?

I am still playing a much better opponent, which I want to extract something out of.

You may very well an excellent athlete and a AAA in volleyball? Do you play Open level volley tournament? I also play volleyball and I have friends who are consider top 1-2 percent in terms of their athletic abilities. They can do the usual stuff like having 42 inch vertical, One legged, one handed slam dunk a basketball etc... They picked up tennis very quickly and benefited from instruction and living in Southern California. Even so, they did not achieve 4.5 status in the time that you feel you've achieved.

I would guess that if you are as good an athlete as you say you are, it will take you 3-4 years to become a 4.5. That's very fast. The vast majority of players will never achieve 4.5 in their lifetime.

A one point rating differential 4.5 vs 5.5 would be an absolute beat down 6-0, 6-1.

Your friend is a 6.0 so go to a garage sale, find a couple of wooden rackets with 40 year old strings, give them to your friend, and he'll still beat you, no matter what you try. You need to give him a few rackets because he'll break the strings in no time, or the racket.

Charlzz
12-28-2008, 02:31 PM
You may very well an excellent athlete and a AAA in volleyball? Do you play Open level volley tournament? I also play volleyball and I have friends who are consider top 1-2 percent in terms of their athletic abilities. They can do the usual stuff like having 42 inch vertical, One legged, one handed slam dunk a basketball etc... They picked up tennis very quickly and benefited from instruction and living in Southern California. Even so, they did not achieve 4.5 status in the time that you feel you've achieved.

I would guess that if you are as good an athlete as you say you are, it will take you 3-4 years to become a 4.5. That's very fast. The vast majority of players will never achieve 4.5 in their lifetime.

A one point rating differential 4.5 vs 5.5 would be an absolute beat down 6-0, 6-1.

Your friend is a 6.0 so go to a garage sale, find a couple of wooden rackets with 40 year old strings, give them to your friend, and he'll still beat you, no matter what you try. You need to give him a few rackets because he'll break the strings in no time, or the racket.

I like this idea. You still get to play tennis, and he has to deal with a smaller racquet. I bet even an ultra-light, oversized racquet would make him work harder to hit the strokes he likes.

Ballinbob
12-28-2008, 03:49 PM
you don't need to focus on anything. a 4.5 and a 6.0 don't...mix. You can do anything you want, you wont even get close. Im not even going to go into your rating, but thats what I think. That's a huge level difference. And by the way, why do people think they're 4.5s because they serve 100mph+?????? I'm an upper end 3.5 and can serve 90mph, so does that mean I jump up to a 4.5 when I can serve 100mph? I don't get this. And this is nothing against you, there have been alot of people who have said this. Also, being a tremendous athlete will not help much with tennis. I'm a varsity track athlete and can run a 100m dash in 11.75 seconds and can also run a mile in 5:20 minutes. Oh and I can run a 400m in 57seconds (not that fast, buts that not what I specialize in anyway). And yeah, I'm still a 3.5.

In short though, he can beat you if he uses a frying pan instead of a racket. That is a HUGE level difference

Tennisguy777
12-28-2008, 05:17 PM
For those out there this is 6.0 tennis. Is your friend this good?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HMipmdYHQqI&feature=related

Charlzz
12-28-2008, 06:59 PM
In short though, he can beat you if he uses a frying pan instead of a racket. That is a HUGE level difference

This I gotta see.

Hey, give the guy a break. He doesn't fully understand the NTRP system and it is confusing to rate yourself without having seen others that have been rated. If he's willing to post video of himself and his friend, then we can have a future debate to enjoy!

Ballinbob
12-28-2008, 07:17 PM
This I gotta see.

Hey, give the guy a break. He doesn't fully understand the NTRP system and it is confusing to rate yourself without having seen others that have been rated. If he's willing to post video of himself and his friend, then we can have a future debate to enjoy!

You know what I'm trying to say.... Your right though it can get confusing. I self rated myself a 5.5 when I first saw the ratings. The level difference is just so big though. I'm an upper end 3.5, and I when I played my friend who is a legit 4.5, he wiped the floor with me 6-0,6-2. He just killed me. I was absolutly stunned, I didn't know what to even think after that. And that's a 1 level difference. A 1.5 level difference? Ooooh man that would be bad.

baseline08thrasher
12-28-2008, 09:02 PM
Dude, think of this as an opportunity, and don't get stressed.

It's all about your mentality going into the match.
That's what counts.

Don't fret,
Go after your shots.
Slowly build up to your zone.

You have to start at 40% and then go up.

It's a middle game.
Start slow, and build it up.


Confidence is key.
Precision is what you want.

Valdez737
12-28-2008, 10:44 PM
Bro thr is a HUGE gap between 4.5 and a 6.0. It take years to become a 4.5 and only a few people have the talant to break the 4.5 barrier.

If you been playing for year I highy doubt you a 4.5 mbe more like a 3.0 belive me a year from now you going to see how much you learned and people you thougt were very good are just avg.

I dont think its possible to become a real 4.5 in a year in a half mbe 3 years if you work very hard and have the talant for it. I know tons of noobs who think they are alot better then thy truely are they just dont know better.

SourStraws
12-29-2008, 12:49 AM
If your friend is a 6.0 and you're a 4.5, then you should get bageled or breadsticked everytime....

Sidetracking:

This thread has really opened my eyes about the effort it takes to become really good..... I never realized that most ppl don't make it past/get to the 4.5 barrier.... Thanks for making me see the light guys

S.S.

Charlzz
12-29-2008, 06:14 AM
You know what I'm trying to say.... Your right though it can get confusing. I self rated myself a 5.5 when I first saw the ratings. The level difference is just so big though. I'm an upper end 3.5, and I when I played my friend who is a legit 4.5, he wiped the floor with me 6-0,6-2. He just killed me. I was absolutly stunned, I didn't know what to even think after that. And that's a 1 level difference. A 1.5 level difference? Ooooh man that would be bad.

Yeah, and he says he's competitive with the guy, that is, he can take a few games off, but never win, so 1 point difference at best. I mean, I suppose there could be some bizarre situation like Bobby Riggs-Margaret Court (the Mother's Day massacre) where he did such weird spins that Court had never seen that it rattled her and she played presumably much worse than she could have.

But assuming the two guys play a reasonable style, it's probably more like 4.0 vs 5.0. Of course, we're just speculating, but odds are, you're right, they are not 1.5 points apart.

mistapooh
12-29-2008, 10:01 AM
I'm in a similar situation with a friend who went to college to play tennis while I pursue academia. I wouldn't play a set, that's pointless.

What we typically do is have long rallies with him wanting to go to net after a couple of exchanges. He hits with maybe 10-20% less pace than he normally does (not including his end shots), but even so, this is often time too fast for me to hurt him. It gets me to get my unit turn down and all of the footwork stuff. I wrong foot myself a lot, but it helps me learn to set up my shots fast, and eventually I'll get in the zone and be able to control the rally somewhat. Can't arm these balls or else I'll start spraying.

Another thing we do is play points with him telling me where he's going to serve. Maybe he's on the ad side and only serve to my backhand, something similar. He says he holds back to 40% power, but it gets us into a point at least.

mental midget
12-29-2008, 10:32 AM
with regards to what you could work on:

i'd say movement and footwork are answers 1 through 27. i'm guessing the guy plays at a pace that you find hard to deal with. for starters, i'd give a lot of concentration to just trying to get to the balls on time, with a balanced body position. if you're not used to the speed, you're probably too busy trying to cope with that aspect of the game, let alone trying to incorporate an effective tennis swing into the equation.

lilycolefan
12-29-2008, 11:27 AM
I remember when I was 12 and reading the NTRP guidelines. I thought I was a 5.0.... It's interesting how far off our self-assessments can be.

Anyway, the camera adds 10 pounds and makes you lose 1.0 NTRP. If you think you are a 4.5 based on someone's video, you're probably a 3.5. Which is pretty good for only picking up a raquet 1.5 years ago.

Haha same here. I have to say I really don't believe someone can be a 4.5 in a year and a half. But then again, Mary Pierce won under 12 nationals 2 years after she began playing tennis and I'm guessing the under 12 national winner is something around high end 4.5 .I know a top 50 ranked junior boy who is 12 and can beat 4.5's then goes on to lose handily to the very top juniors so I guess the under 12 national winner is at least a 4.5 if not higher. So Mary did that in 2 years but she also trained a lot and has unbelievable talent so I guess it's not impossible. Ana Medina Garrigues (spell?) began playing tennis at age 12 and started playing professional at 15 and a half. Granted she wasn't playing Wimbledon or anything but low level futures. This would put her as something like a 6.5 after 3 and a half years are playing. She did however train at an academy. So it can be done but it's HIGHLY unlikely. And just the way the guy said "judging from videos on youtube" that he was a 4.5, it makes it even more unbelievable. Heck, even if he had said I am beating computer ranked 4.5 players I would have been a little skeptical. Anyway I think people in this thread are focusing to much on his rating and are not doing enough to answer his questions. Sorry if there are a lot of typos in this post, I'm dead tired.

Charlzz
12-29-2008, 11:30 AM
Anyway I think people in this thread are focusing to much on his rating and are not doing enough to answer his questions.

Yeah, I think the OP must have checked out of this thread quite a while ago.

raiden031
12-29-2008, 12:02 PM
This thread has really opened my eyes about the effort it takes to become really good..... I never realized that most ppl don't make it past/get to the 4.5 barrier.... Thanks for making me see the light guys


Only something like 10-15% of players will make it to 4.5 or above. Something like 1% are 5.0 and above.

A buddy on my team got bumped up to 4.0 after his first year of usta 3.0 league tennis, and he's only been playing tennis a total of at most 1.5 years. He is an athletic guy with background in many sports, and has been getting private lessons at a club. I'd say he's more the exception than the rule, but no doubt the most impressive tennis progression I've ever seen. He'd still get stomped against a 4.5 though. Maybe if he practiced for hours each day he could've made it to 4.5.

The bottom line though is that anyone who can jump to 4.5 in 1.5 years must practice for hours each day and must know what they are doing! You better become an expert on the game if you are going to self-teach your way to a 4.5 that quickly. I would say I know alot more than alot of my peers about the game and training my body to play it, because I am very motivated and have improved quickly because of it. I couldn't see myself getting to where I am if I didn't have a pretty good idea of what my strengths and weaknesses are, and what to do to fix them. You have to be very observant of what goes on in a match when watching advanced players play and be able to incorporate that into your own game without the help of an instructor. You can't be clueless like someone who has a teaching pro spoonfeeding them their game.

mikeler
12-29-2008, 12:28 PM
I've battled a few players that I call 4.5 *Servers*. They have this unbelievable first serve which also happens to be their second serve as well. You can usually only get 1 break against these guys per set because they hit the serve so well. The 2nd serve always breaks down in pressure situations and they can't return well. Volleys tend to be decent with suspect ground strokes. Take away their serve and they are 3.5 to 4.0 players.

RunningBeagle
12-29-2008, 12:29 PM
On the other hand, does anyone think this is legit 4.0?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8xB4RLZguN4&feature=related

bad_call
12-29-2008, 12:32 PM
I've battled a few players that I call 4.5 *Servers*. They have this unbelievable first serve which also happens to be their second serve as well. You can usually only get 1 break against these guys per set because they hit the serve so well. The 2nd serve always breaks down in pressure situations and they can't return well. Volleys tend to be decent with suspect ground strokes. Take away their serve and they are 3.5 to 4.0 players.

take away anyone's serve and it's just a rally.

bad_call
12-29-2008, 12:35 PM
On the other hand, does anyone think this is legit 4.0?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8xB4RLZguN4&feature=related

this is too painful to watch...

IvanAndreevich
01-03-2009, 06:56 PM
Hey guys

I didn't check out. I did post that I am going on vacation, and I will get back in the next 2 days. We'll continue our discussion.

So far, I like the suggestion where my friend gets 1 serve. I am also thinking we should start every game at 15-0 for me.

And yes, I do have a 40+ inch vertical :p

IvanAndreevich
01-07-2009, 10:56 PM
Hey guys

My serve is here, please offer suggestions - http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?p=2986390

I will implement some suggestions about playing my friend and post in this thread next time I play him. I think it will be a few weeks, he's travelling around the world for some fencing related stuff.