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View Full Version : Use of the non-hitting arm during forehand??


Gugafan
12-29-2008, 09:45 AM
I have recently been told that the non hitting arm works as a counter balance when hitting forehands. My question is, should one always keep the non-hitting arm out infront and parallel to the baseline or should this only apply on specific forehand situations....For instance when dealing with a short ball and you have time to setup would the preperation shown below be more useful.


http://www.tennis.com/uploadedImages/Your_Game/Instruction_Articles/Forehand/2006_04_17_open_stance_forehand.jpg

LeeD
12-29-2008, 09:56 AM
Wouldn't that totally depend on your personal physical makeup and style, plus what grip you use, plus according to actual hitting situation of the incoming ball?
Fast balls deep at your forehand require little more than a solid block.
High soft balls at your forehand can be hit really hard by you, so more rotation of the torso, longer backswing, and faster swing.
But we all make the racket head move in different ways, so no universal solution here.
All forehands are not the same, so you can't generalize on one side with one technique.
Comfortable with early racket preparation is the key, any way you want to do it.

Farz77
12-29-2008, 04:21 PM
Always get that non-dominant hand in front and parallel to the net. That pic of Moya is exactly what everyone should look like at that point in time of the stroke. Obviously with little adjustments.

tenzinrocks
12-29-2008, 06:27 PM
Use it for balance. If you're right handed, have your left arm out so your chin touches your left shoulder and after the forehand swing, have your left shoulder touch your chin. Nadal does his in a way where he kind of looks like he's pushing through a huge wave, kind of looks like he's swimming with his left hand

LeeD
12-29-2008, 06:31 PM
If you hit like Moya, then prepare your off hand like him.
If you don't, maybe it's not for you.
I see traditional eastern forehand players point their offhand towards the opponent's court.
I see slicer dicer forehands and they mostly don't prepare their offhands any particular way.
I'd love Moya's forehand, but then I like Sampras's, Nadals, Federer's, so maybe ONE prep position is not the answer.

WildVolley
12-29-2008, 08:18 PM
It is standard technique these days. Of course, the hand doesn't stay in that position. The off-hand will normally initiate the stroke and then move out before pulling in at contact.

Most pros use that technique. Agassi does, as well as Safin, Federer, Nadal, Gonzo, Ancic, Gulbis, Roddick, Djokovic, Blake, Tsonga, Murray, etc.

mistapooh
12-29-2008, 08:33 PM
The non-dominant hand also helps you complete your unit turn. Without it counter-balancing your strokes, you end up over rotating (me personally).

[ GTR ]
12-30-2008, 03:33 AM
I think the non hitting arm is more useful for shoulder rotation which gives more power than it is for balance..

tennismike33
12-30-2008, 05:58 AM
;2960700']I think the non hitting arm is more useful for shoulder rotation which gives more power than it is for balance..

The non hitting arm does this and so much more. In preperation to hit the shot getting the off arm in position, out in front as I teach, this will begin the process of the shot. Try hitting a ball without using your off arm to feel the difference.

The off arm up allows your shoulders to prepare, which will give you the full shoulder turn, this is where the balance you are talking comes from. Power is nothing more than the result of a properly prepared for and struck shot.

mike53
12-30-2008, 07:22 AM
I have heard it suggested that the non-hitting hand point to the ball as it crosses the net. Is this a good idea?

SystemicAnomaly
12-30-2008, 07:37 AM
The non-dominant hand also helps you complete your unit turn. Without it counter-balancing your strokes, you end up over rotating (me personally).

I agree with this.


I have heard it suggested that the non-hitting hand point to the ball as it crosses the net. Is this a good idea?

That is an older school of thought. The arm extended out to the side yields a batter shoulder rotation. It also provides an excellent spatial reference to the incoming ball (as I've mentioned several times in other recent threads) -- it should help you with your footwork and getting your body into an optimal position (location) for hitting your FH shots.

Bungalo Bill
12-30-2008, 07:46 AM
;2960700']I think the non hitting arm is more useful for shoulder rotation which gives more power than it is for balance..

Actually it is for balance as well. Balance from the standpoint of it keeping you balanced and allowing your angular momentum to move towards the ball rather than away from the ball and thus losing your balance. Keep in mind, we are not talking about balance from the standpoint of you not falling over on to the ground. We are talking about the delicate balance on your feet that you need to allow angualr momentum to move through the ball. If something pulls you away from that, you will execute mechanisms to counterbalance and thus "throw" your balance off a bit.

The non-dominant arm should:

1. Help in bringing the racquet back, which helps,

2. Improve your shoulder rotation (goal is to get the front shoulder under the chin), which helps,

3. You extend the non-dominant arm to "scan" the contact zone, which helps,

4. You improve your timing and balance for the forward swing, which helps,

5. You accelerate by folding this arm back into the body allowing your hitting arm to accelerate through contact.

Gugafan
12-31-2008, 01:29 PM
Actually it is for balance as well. Balance from the standpoint of it keeping you balanced and allowing your angular momentum to move towards the ball rather than away from the ball.

This is a great point. I have started extending the non dominant hand more during my forehand swing, and found my momentum was moving forward, allowing me to attack more.

Bungalo Bill
12-31-2008, 01:45 PM
This is a great point. I have started extending the non dominant hand more during my forehand swing, and found my momentum was moving forward, allowing me to attack more.

Yeah baby. Send that energy into the ball. Use your arms in the right way to help you accelerate. This means you dont have to over do it in other areas (like swining your arm purposely harder) to generate power into the ball. USE THE BODY, USE THE ARMS TO HELP YOU SWING!

Bungalo Bill
12-31-2008, 01:47 PM
http://www.tennis.com/uploadedImages/Your_Game/Instruction_Articles/Forehand/2006_04_17_open_stance_forehand.jpg

Beautiful technique. Just awesome. Moya is also a real cool guy. A buddy of mine was lucky enough to go golfing with him at the Pacific Life in Palm Springs. Very down to earth person.

Failed
12-31-2008, 02:01 PM
Actually it is for balance as well. Balance from the standpoint of it keeping you balanced and allowing your angular momentum to move towards the ball rather than away from the ball and thus losing your balance. Keep in mind, we are not talking about balance from the standpoint of you not falling over on to the ground. We are talking about the delicate balance on your feet that you need to allow angualr momentum to move through the ball. If something pulls you away from that, you will execute mechanisms to counterbalance and thus "throw" your balance off a bit.

The non-dominant arm should:

1. Help in bringing the racquet back, which helps,

2. Improve your shoulder rotation (goal is to get the front shoulder under the chin), which helps,

3. You extend the non-dominant arm to "scan" the contact zone, which helps,

4. You improve your timing and balance for the forward swing, which helps,

5. You accelerate by folding this arm back into the body allowing your hitting arm to accelerate through contact.

It also helps spacing the shot. The fact is that the use of your non-dominant hand is required if not necessary for a good stroke.

Bungalo Bill
12-31-2008, 02:11 PM
It also helps spacing the shot. The fact is that the use of your non-dominant hand is required if not necessary for a good stroke.

Yup that is true.

phoenicks
01-01-2009, 07:50 AM
Will says it all in this video.

http://au.youtube.com/watch?v=aYwnXyXKquE&feature=channel_page

Gugafan
01-01-2009, 09:03 AM
Will says it all in this video.

http://au.youtube.com/watch?v=aYwnXyXKquE&feature=channel_page

Nice video....some great posts overall in this thread. Shoutout to BB and others.

TenisuBaka
01-17-2009, 05:30 AM
Very interesting thread. I searched for information on this after watching FYB many times and shadowing. What I am confused about at this point is what exactly to do with the non-hitting arm at the beginning of swing to contact. Should I actually try to lead the swing from the non-hitting arm by pushing it out and around my body with my should as though to chop the air? I would think no, but that is exactly what the guy seems to be doing in the video on FYB. (the video of the WW forehand, not the video of the standard forehand).

TenisuBaka
01-17-2009, 05:36 AM
Very interesting thread. I searched for information on this after watching FYB many times and shadowing. What I am confused about at this point is what exactly to do with the non-hitting arm at the beginning of swing to contact. Should I actually try to lead the swing from the non-hitting arm by pushing it out and around my body with my should as though to chop the air? I would think no, but that is exactly what the guy seems to be doing in the video on FYB. (the video of the WW forehand, not the video of the standard forehand).


Sorry, I cannot figure out how to edit. The actual question should read:

Should I actually try to lead the swing with the non-hitting arm by using my shoulder to push it out and around my body as though to chop the air?

chico9166
01-18-2009, 10:18 AM
Sorry, I cannot figure out how to edit. The actual question should read:

Should I actually try to lead the swing with the non-hitting arm by using my shoulder to push it out and around my body as though to chop the air?

If I understand your question correctly, I would say definately no. In a more modern, mulit-segmented swing, the arms, and hands should not "lead" the forward swing. This is not how you want to trigger the foreward movement with the hitting structure.

Rather, you want to key the forward movement, at least initially, with the feet and hips. So, when your think it is time to "swing", instead, rotate from the ground up. It is very important that the core leads----and the arms and hitting structure respond to that movement.
Not vice-versa.