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Farz77
12-31-2008, 03:57 PM
Lately I have had trouble on the takeback of the one hander. I know on the forehand you normally let go of the racket when the ball bouces but on the backhand side, I'm not so sure when to turn, how much to turn, whether to wait a while to bring that racket behind and also when to step into the shot. Also I was wondering if anyone pushes the throat of the racket away in order to later onget a closed racket face lifting to contact and becoming vertical. So :
1. Rhythm of the takeback, when how much?
2. When to step with that front foot (wait with an open stance then close it as the ball approaches?)
3. Pushing the throat? How do you guys keep that racket face closed? How do the pros do it? I
I know Gasquet and Henin have extreme grips so that naturally closes the racket face when it's in the slot position but like Federer how does he manage with his eastern grip
I appreciate your time and I hope to hear from you soon.

LeeD
12-31-2008, 04:06 PM
As soon as you recognise the ball is headed to your backhand, you take it back as far as you need. That is determined by how fast the ball is going, and how far you gotta move to hit the ball.
You cannot possibly take the racket back too early. OK, you take the racket back to your backhand side and the ball comes to your forehand. That is too early.
You don't take the front foot stepacross until you are within hitting range, then get it there as soon as you possibly can.
Good drill is..... have your partner hit you random balls, and count your successful backhands.
Now have him TELL YOU everytime he hits to your backhand, you take the racket back early, and your percentage of good shots hugely improves.
Don't know anyone who actually pushes with the freehand. Use deltoids.
When and how much is up to you. Everyone hits differently, our swingspeeds are different. You find out with practice. Long loopy swings need earlier prep. Late flat swings can get by with later prep, but you should always prep as early as possible.
Pure fluid swings depend on perfect timing. Sometimes your mean opponent decides to hit the ball a little deeper and faster, no fair !!

In D Zone
12-31-2008, 07:26 PM
Lately I have had trouble on the takeback of the one hander. I know on the forehand you normally let go of the racket when the ball bouces but on the backhand side, I'm not so sure when to turn, how much to turn, whether to wait a while to bring that racket behind and also when to step into the shot. Also I was wondering if anyone pushes the throat of the racket away in order to later onget a closed racket face lifting to contact and becoming vertical. So :
1. Rhythm of the takeback, when how much?
2. When to step with that front foot (wait with an open stance then close it as the ball approaches?)
3. Pushing the throat? How do you guys keep that racket face closed? How do the pros do it? I
I know Gasquet and Henin have extreme grips so that naturally closes the racket face when it's in the slot position but like Federer how does he manage with his eastern grip
I appreciate your time and I hope to hear from you soon.


Key to one hbh is the prep:

Eye fixed on the ball. Don't wait for the last minute before you turn with your footwork by this time your timing is off.

Here's a good video that will explain it in detail - prep, turn, footwork, contact and follow through.

http://www.playsportstv.com/box.php?media_id=387&id=6&xs=3

http://www.playsportstv.com/box.php?id=6&media_id=388

Farz77
01-01-2009, 06:30 AM
Key to one hbh is the prep:

Eye fixed on the ball. Don't wait for the last minute before you turn with your footwork by this time your timing is off.

Here's a good video that will explain it in detail - prep, turn, footwork, contact and follow through.

http://www.playsportstv.com/box.php?media_id=387&id=6&xs=3

http://www.playsportstv.com/box.php?id=6&media_id=388

Thanks for the vid! But that's not my problem. My footwork is awesome, well at least getting to the ball. But once I'm waiting for the ball shoulder turn done, almost looking over my right chin, do I wait with an open stance and then step in. And I think that's what I should do but when. I know it's depending on the speed of the ball but I have trouble knowing the timing and when to bring that body weight foward onto the front foot.

In D Zone
01-01-2009, 10:26 AM
Thanks for the vid! But that's not my problem. My footwork is awesome, well at least getting to the ball. But once I'm waiting for the ball shoulder turn done, almost looking over my right chin, do I wait with an open stance and then step in. And I think that's what I should do but when. I know it's depending on the speed of the ball but I have trouble knowing the timing and when to bring that body weight foward onto the front foot.

On most instances:
Ball coming to the left (assuming u are right handed): move the left leg first (shuffling going lateral left with shoulder, racquet and hip semi ready on bh position) , as the ball gets close then move the right leg forward for the weight transfer and swing. Racquet take back, don't need to over exaggerate just use what you are used to doing - goal is keep the bh shot consistent along with timing and footwork. As you get more comfortable with it, u can add more power with the racquet speed.

On faster pace:

Sometime you'll find the ball is heading straight at your body (too late to move to close stance). In this case, use the racquet (1hbh position) as backboard by blocking the ball back. Try stepping forward upon contact, don't over swing - the body movement will generate the power

Djokovicfan4life
01-01-2009, 02:59 PM
There's a 150posts+ thread on this very issue on the first page. It should have all the information you need.

Farz77
01-01-2009, 03:29 PM
There's a 150posts+ thread on this very issue on the first page. It should have all the information you need.

HAHA! I found that thread just before you posted this message. Thanks by the way. You are correct, plenty of info right there.

ximian
01-04-2009, 02:25 PM
... and you're a 5.5? :rolleyes:

jasoncho92
01-04-2009, 02:27 PM
... and you're a 5.5? :rolleyes:
Of course, every 5.5 in the world and especially Canada have problems with timing a basic backhand.

Farz77
01-04-2009, 04:02 PM
... and you're a 5.5? :rolleyes:

I'm 5.0 by the way. I thought I was 5.5 but my coach said I was overrating myself and said I was probably around 5.0 He brought it down cuz of my one hander. I switched just over a year ago, and all I need are little adjustments here and there.

ximian
01-04-2009, 04:11 PM
.... lol. Okay, and you're a 5.0? :rolleyes:

Mada
01-04-2009, 04:14 PM
.... lol. Okay, and you're a 5.0? :rolleyes:

He is most likely not.

LeeD
01-04-2009, 05:30 PM
You are not 5.0.
Your coach rated you 5.0.
You're 5.0 when you can go mid rounds in Men's 5.0 tournaments.
Even if you're #1 statewide in Boy's 18, you cannot claim 5.0.
You might hit like a 5.0. Maybe your strokes are great. But you're not 5.0 just because someone just decides it without tournament results.

Farz77
01-05-2009, 11:52 AM
You are not 5.0.
Your coach rated you 5.0.
You're 5.0 when you can go mid rounds in Men's 5.0 tournaments.
Even if you're #1 statewide in Boy's 18, you cannot claim 5.0.
You might hit like a 5.0. Maybe your strokes are great. But you're not 5.0 just because someone just decides it without tournament results.

Have you ever heard of 5.0 or 3.5 or any of those ratings in tournaments outside of US? If so, definetly not in Canada. And I do have tournament results, I already said I won two tourneys in the last month.

LeeD
01-05-2009, 12:28 PM
When I finally earned my US 4.5 rating, I entered as many OPEN tournaments as I could get to, travelling all over California, Nevada, and Oregon.
That year, I entered the Qualifier for the TranAmerica PRO tournament, and won 3 rounds, one against #6 at Stanford University and finally losing to JuaroSuarez (#1 at Foothill U), two years later World top 20.
Now consider..... If Juaro got to World ranking top 20 TWO years after I lost to him, what do you think his ranking would have been when I played him? I'd think at least top college then and at least 5.5 nowadays.
And #6 singles at StanfordUniversity, like top ranked 20 tennis college in the nation, is no slouch of a team.
Sure, he had a cold, he was sorearmed, and his family had just moved from the Eastcoast to pressure him at the match.
I was STILL a 4.5 player!!! And playing well in pro qualifiers doesn't get you any higher a rating. You still gotta WIN or get into 2 finals in 4.5 to claim the next level.

Farz77
01-05-2009, 12:32 PM
When I finally earned my US 4.5 rating, I entered as many OPEN tournaments as I could get to, travelling all over California, Nevada, and Oregon.
That year, I entered the Qualifier for the TranAmerica PRO tournament, and won 3 rounds, one against #6 at Stanford University and finally losing to JuaroSuarez (#1 at Foothill U), two years later World top 20.
Now consider..... If Juaro got to World ranking top 20 TWO years after I lost to him, what do you think his ranking would have been when I played him? I'd think at least top college then and at least 5.5 nowadays.
And #6 singles at StanfordUniversity, like top ranked 20 tennis college in the nation, is no slouch of a team.
Sure, he had a cold, he was sorearmed, and his family had just moved from the Eastcoast to pressure him at the match.
I was STILL a 4.5 player!!! And playing well in pro qualifiers doesn't get you any higher a rating. You still gotta WIN or get into 2 finals in 4.5 to claim the next level.

We don't use the NTRP rating. Our tournaments are rated by stars.

Bungalo Bill
01-05-2009, 01:44 PM
Lately I have had trouble on the takeback of the one hander. I know on the forehand you normally let go of the racket when the ball bouces but on the backhand side, I'm not so sure when to turn, how much to turn, whether to wait a while to bring that racket behind and also when to step into the shot. Also I was wondering if anyone pushes the throat of the racket away in order to later onget a closed racket face lifting to contact and becoming vertical. So :
1. Rhythm of the takeback, when how much?
2. When to step with that front foot (wait with an open stance then close it as the ball approaches?)
3. Pushing the throat? How do you guys keep that racket face closed? How do the pros do it? I
I know Gasquet and Henin have extreme grips so that naturally closes the racket face when it's in the slot position but like Federer how does he manage with his eastern grip
I appreciate your time and I hope to hear from you soon.

There is a lot of information on everything you need to know about the onehander. Do a search on the "smile" pattern...etc...

Farz77
01-05-2009, 01:49 PM
There is a lot of information on everything you need to know about the onehander. Do a search on the "smile" pattern...etc...

Thanks Alot BB

naylor
01-06-2009, 01:53 AM
There is a lot of information on everything you need to know about the onehander. Do a search on the "smile" pattern...etc...

For me, the key thing that's improved my backhand is not to let go of the throat (with my left hand - I play SHBH) too early. That means I don't turn / close myself too much, and also (as a result) as I stay less closed when I swing through my left leg comes across and acts as the brake at the end of the swing. Which means I finish the swing balanced and I can pivot back by taking off my left leg.

Bungalo Bill
01-06-2009, 06:51 AM
For me, the key thing that's improved my backhand is not to let go of the throat (with my left hand - I play SHBH) too early. That means I don't turn / close myself too much, and also (as a result) as I stay less closed when I swing through my left leg comes across and acts as the brake at the end of the swing. Which means I finish the swing balanced and I can pivot back by taking off my left leg.

Many people have heard that you need to turn your back to the opponent in order to have a good unit turn. The problem with this is people can do this in various degrees due to age, conditioning, etc...

I believe a better reference is not to use your back but use your front shoulder as the signal that your unit turn is sufficient.

A sufficient unit turn is what players need to practice and master. You do not need to have this back straining unit turn that you do not have sufficient relaxation in the neck muscles to accomplish while trying to keep both eyes on the ball.

Bringing your front shoulder under the chin provides the feedback that a player needs that his unit turn is sufficient.