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Viper
01-02-2009, 08:11 AM
I've come to the sad realization that I'll never be a pro and I'll never probably play any USTA tournaments. At first I complained when I first entered the tennis team for my high school, but after a few matches I loved the format. I like that everyone isn't as good as they think they are, and with a bit of mental toughness and solid enough strokes you can pull out a victory. I'm a Junior so I only have 2 years left of this tennis retreat. After I graduate though, I have no idea where I can find the same mix of people who want to compete, but aren't super stars. Can anyone recommend suggestions?

sureshs
01-02-2009, 08:23 AM
College ...

unprotennis
01-02-2009, 08:24 AM
College ...

amen to that

Viper
01-02-2009, 08:37 AM
I really don't think I'm good enough for a college tennis team lol.

TokyopunK
01-02-2009, 08:43 AM
Craigslist

sureshs
01-02-2009, 09:11 AM
I really don't think I'm good enough for a college tennis team lol.

Then it is tough. If you start working, you will be in up to your head in your career. Then you will marry and have kids and worry about money. After 20 years, you will feel the itch again and post on this board asking what new racquets can replace the old Babolat PD you still have. You will also get into an argument with the guy who says that the current #1 was better than Fed or Nadal ever were because tennis is a much faster and powerful game now.

raiden031
01-02-2009, 10:05 AM
Why can't you play in NTRP leagues and tournaments?

LeeD
01-02-2009, 10:16 AM
Yeah, there's always leagues, 3.0, and handicapped classes.
Then there's pickup playground levels.
Just don't drop by where I play on weekends, when the 6.0's show up to goof around, the 6'6" guys who hit kick serves about 6' high and 130+ first serves ...that don't go in regularly, of course.
Those were #1's in 4 year colleges:shock::shock:

mike53
01-02-2009, 10:24 AM
I was in the same position myself and I found a home in the intramural program at a large state university (Ohio State). Cost almost nothing, matches were optional and it was competitive, but nothing like varsity NCAA.

gocard
01-02-2009, 10:51 AM
I wish I had joined the intramural club team when I was in college. Too bad I didn't really get into tennis until after I graduated and had more time to play! Now it's harder to find a drop in group to hit with since most people will usually go to the courts with other people already.

LeeD
01-02-2009, 10:57 AM
You don't say where you live.
Most places, you hit up all the local shops and ask around.
You hit up high schools (if that's your level), or colleges and clubs and leave notices.
If there's a way, and you don't live in outer Alaska, you can find decent enough hitting partners.
And one way to insure you'll get them back again is to crush them 0-0. They'll for sure want to try again, if they're worth playing against.

mikeler
01-02-2009, 11:59 AM
When I picked up my rackets again 5 years ago, I started out by joining an online league. That led me to play at the various facilities around town where I found even more leagues. Eventually I met enough players my level, so I stopped playing leagues about 2 years ago. I have so many players in my rotation now that I have to turn people down because I'm playing someone else. That is a good problem to have if you are a tennis addict like me :)

oneguy21
01-02-2009, 12:01 PM
Start playing some USTA tournaments.

fuzz nation
01-02-2009, 02:56 PM
I've coached high school jv and varsity teams for a few years and it's a rather unique situation for kids at your age and level. Compared with a lot of other sports like field hockey, football, etc. where the careers of most of those athletes will be done after graduation, the tennis players are really just getting started in a sport that they will have access to just about forever.

I coach with a guy who's been a tennis pro (teaching & coaching) for most of his life and as "tennis people", we have no interest in turning away anyone who comes out for the teams. All we want is to grow the game and keep as many people headed in the right direction as we can. As a high school junior, you probably have a little bit of a history with tennis under your belt, but it may be difficult to appreciate what's potentially ahead for you in the sport. You've honestly only seen the tip of the iceberg.

All you need to do is network and keep after your scheduling to make time for the game. Try out some USTA tourneys and/or leagues where you use an NTRP rating, look for local leagues that are part of Parks and Rec. Dept. programs, look for parks where you can get in on pick-up games, and keep your own classroom open. Get occasional instruction (pros can help you with your networking, too) and do some of your own studies. Hey, Richard Williams did it and he produced two of the best players of our time.

I missed out on a college career with a blown up ankle, but in more recent history I got back into the sport in a big way with playing and coaching. As one thing led to another, I finally certified last year with the USPTA and I'm learning more now than ever. I'm 42 and not even a full-time tennis person, but the more I've pursued the sport and dug into the culture that's out there, the more momentum I've found in my tennis life. Keep after it and you'll be fine - believe me, you're just getting started!

mental midget
01-02-2009, 04:00 PM
I've coached high school jv and varsity teams for a few years and it's a rather unique situation for kids at your age and level. Compared with a lot of other sports like field hockey, football, etc. where the careers of most of those athletes will be done after graduation, the tennis players are really just getting started in a sport that they will have access to just about forever.

I coach with a guy who's been a tennis pro (teaching & coaching) for most of his life and as "tennis people", we have no interest in turning away anyone who comes out for the teams. All we want is to grow the game and keep as many people headed in the right direction as we can. As a high school junior, you probably have a little bit of a history with tennis under your belt, but it may be difficult to appreciate what's potentially ahead for you in the sport. You've honestly only seen the tip of the iceberg.

All you need to do is network and keep after your scheduling to make time for the game. Try out some USTA tourneys and/or leagues where you use an NTRP rating, look for local leagues that are part of Parks and Rec. Dept. programs, look for parks where you can get in on pick-up games, and keep your own classroom open. Get occasional instruction (pros can help you with your networking, too) and do some of your own studies. Hey, Richard Williams did it and he produced two of the best players of our time.

I missed out on a college career with a blown up ankle, but in more recent history I got back into the sport in a big way with playing and coaching. As one thing led to another, I finally certified last year with the USPTA and I'm learning more now than ever. I'm 42 and not even a full-time tennis person, but the more I've pursued the sport and dug into the culture that's out there, the more momentum I've found in my tennis life. Keep after it and you'll be fine - believe me, you're just getting started!

do you mind me asking, what is the road like towards uspta certification? i've been getting back into tennis lately, and was kicking around the idea of becoming a teaching pro at some point, just love being around tennis, taught it as a teenager and in my early 20's.