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View Full Version : 1hbh possible switch.


The_Steak
01-02-2009, 08:33 PM
As the title suggests, I am possibly making the switch from a 1hbh to a 2 hander.

Why? I have only been learning a year and already am playing some high 4.5 players to low 5.5 players. When playing 3.5 players I can hit my 1hbh just fine, but as the level of playing gets higher, so does the pace of their ground strokes. I simply can not prepare in time to hit their shots and am having to revert to hitting some weak slice returns. Another reason is my father also wants me to switch. He favors the 2 hander because he says that I am simply to weak, as well as I can not play very aggressively using the one hander.

I really love the one hander because it feels the most natural to me as well as I can hit some pretty immortal passing shots. Do any TW members have any suggestions as of how I can improve my 1hbh in terms of preparation and workouts to strengthen my arm?

-Jon

mental midget
01-02-2009, 09:06 PM
it's just a harder stroke with regards to adjusting to pace, spin, etc--hey, you've got one less hand on the racket, that's the way the cookie crumbles.

my advice would be to work on preparation and recovery--don't allow yourself those split-second moments of enjoyment as you wind up and hit through the ball. prepare ridiculously early, and when you hit the ball, get the hells out of there and get ready for the next shot. a lot of it is just getting used to moving faster--faster footwork, faster everything. it takes some getting used to, that's what going up levels is all about. no magic bullet. get out there and do it a million times, you'll start to feel it.

Rickson
01-02-2009, 10:24 PM
Stick with the one hander.

Djokovicfan4life
01-03-2009, 02:04 AM
that's the way the cookie crumbles.



http://us.ent4.yimg.com/movies.yahoo.com/images/hv/photo/movie_pix/universal_pictures/bruce_almighty/jim_carrey/bruce6.jpg

You said that you have trouble preparing against higher level players, which is a huge tell that your backswing is too long. Tennisguy777 started a thread about his backhand that should address how to get rid of this problem for you. Don't give up on the one hander just yet. It's not as complicated as some people would like you to believe.

The_Steak
01-03-2009, 07:36 PM
Could you please link me?

Djokovicfan4life
01-03-2009, 07:39 PM
The discussion about the correct take back starts somewhere in the second page, I think.

sinned
01-05-2009, 06:14 AM
I'd love a two hander, but I can't play competitively without my one hander. So here's what I've had to do.

It takes time to learn when to step in and take it on the rise, or when to stay at the baseline and slice the highball, or even take a step back and let the ball drop. Half the time when I step in and end up blocking and guiding the ball more than driving the ball, I basically steal time and just place the ball. Gasquet is the best example of taking a step back to hit a good topspin drive.

Also learn to adjust, if your opponent is hitting some penatrating shots play further back than your use to. I prefer to stay ontop of the baseline but I vary depending on who I'm playing. I love coming in and hitting a flat/block (less follow through) but it still isn't the most consistent shot. It's great practice to hit at the baseline, but for consistency in a rally and/or to win a stroke, I'd recommend just take a step or two back and keep it in play.

Djokovicfan4life
01-05-2009, 08:40 AM
I'd love a two hander, but I can't play competitively without my one hander. So here's what I've had to do.

It takes time to learn when to step in and take it on the rise, or when to stay at the baseline and slice the highball, or even take a step back and let the ball drop. Half the time when I step in and end up blocking and guiding the ball more than driving the ball, I basically steal time and just place the ball. Gasquet is the best example of taking a step back to hit a good topspin drive.

Also learn to adjust, if your opponent is hitting some penatrating shots play further back than your use to. I prefer to stay ontop of the baseline but I vary depending on who I'm playing. I love coming in and hitting a flat/block (less follow through) but it still isn't the most consistent shot. It's great practice to hit at the baseline, but for consistency in a rally and/or to win a stroke, I'd recommend just take a step or two back and keep it in play.

Yeah, I prefer to stand right on top of the baseline as well, but sometimes you have to just accept that you may have to step back a little to get your timing down. I live in Oklahoma and the wind can get absolutely vicious at times. My brother and I don't exactly hit the most penetrating shots you've ever seen, but the wind turns them into very heavy balls anyway. When playing in conditions like these I fell that my be option is to just take a step back and give myself some more time, and this is coming from someone with fairly compact strokes.