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billytu721
01-08-2009, 10:29 PM
i am going to get my bachelor degree next year and havent played any college tennis. I was wondering if it was still possible for me to play tennis as a graduate student at another college? any rules?

kctennis1005
01-09-2009, 03:58 AM
i am going to get my bachelor degree next year and havent played any college tennis. I was wondering if it was still possible for me to play tennis as a graduate student at another college? any rules?

as long as u are in your 5th year of school next year u can play....the rule is that u have 5 years of schooling to play 4 seasons....there is a grad student on the georgetown men's team

jbetti
01-09-2009, 03:06 PM
Check out the college club tennnis scene, too, if you haven't already. It's booming. I know it wouldn't be the varsity experience you're looking for, but it keeps the juices flowing.

bluetrain4
01-09-2009, 03:53 PM
as long as u are in your 5th year of school next year u can play....the rule is that u have 5 years of schooling to play 4 seasons....there is a grad student on the georgetown men's team

I can't be sure, but I don't think that's right. You have 5 years to play your 4 years of tennis once you start playing as a student, (no matter the level (undergrad/grad), not simply once you start attending school (which will, obviously, always be undergrad). If you never played in undergrad, and happen to be good enough to get on a team, you should be able to play 4 years once in grad school, assuming you're in grad school for that long.

Again, I'm not sure.

The one example I can think of falls more in line with your theory. A couple of years ago, the No. 1 womens player at the University of Minnesota graduated from Minnesota before her 4 years of eligibility had run out. She attended grad school at Northwestern and played No. 4 or 5 during her first year of grad school.

Also, the rules are probably different for divisions. I know DIII, which doesn't have scholarships, you can definitely play a whole 4-year career as a grad student, assuming you didn't play as an undergrad.

mikro112
01-09-2009, 04:32 PM
Yes you can!

I'm grad student and I'm currently playing college tennis. :)

pandal3oy
02-17-2009, 12:55 PM
Yes you can!

I'm grad student and I'm currently playing college tennis. :)

where at? i want to do the same later on.

Lindsay
02-17-2009, 08:00 PM
At division 1 institutions, you have 1 year from the time you graduate high school to begin your eligibility. So you can't start playing as a junior or senior, yet alone grad student. You can, however, play as a grad student as long as you started your eligibility in that 1 year window, and you have 5 years to complete that eligibility. I believe there is also a rule that you can compete as a grad student as long as its at the same institution you completed your undergrad. So you can't play at USC for 3 years as an undergrad then transfer to Texas to play your last year as a grad student. The rule refers to transfer students in athletics programs only being undergrads. I have no idea what the rules are at Division 2, 3 or NAIA. They could be very different and I'm sure they are.

brodey147
02-18-2009, 09:09 AM
At division 1 institutions, you have 1 year from the time you graduate high school to begin your eligibility. So you can't start playing as a junior or senior, yet alone grad student. You can, however, play as a grad student as long as you started your eligibility in that 1 year window, and you have 5 years to complete that eligibility. I believe there is also a rule that you can compete as a grad student as long as its at the same institution you completed your undergrad. So you can't play at USC for 3 years as an undergrad then transfer to Texas to play your last year as a grad student. The rule refers to transfer students in athletics programs only being undergrads. I have no idea what the rules are at Division 2, 3 or NAIA. They could be very different and I'm sure they are.

Completely false. As was previously mentioned, the NCAA allows recently graduated student-athletes the opportunity to complete their eligibility at their post-graduate institutions. An example that comes to mind is Brian Livingston, a men's player at the University of Illinois, who is getting his MBA after playing his first three years at (and graduating from) Northern Illinois University.

Lindsay
02-18-2009, 09:35 AM
Completely false. As was previously mentioned, the NCAA allows recently graduated student-athletes the opportunity to complete their eligibility at their post-graduate institutions. An example that comes to mind is Brian Livingston, a men's player at the University of Illinois, who is getting his MBA after playing his first three years at (and graduating from) Northern Illinois University.


Yes, I looked that up and have been meaning to post. You're exactly right. You can compete as a grad student at a institution other than the one you completed your undergrad. But the information above it has been verified. You cannot begin playing any later than 1 year after graduating high school at division 1 institutions.

Bash and Crash
02-18-2009, 10:21 AM
Lindsay, i thought eligibility started once enrolled at taking classes, not 1 year after graduation, but I may be wrong

Bash and Crash
02-18-2009, 10:23 AM
from ncaa website

Graduate Student Eligibility
A student-athlete who is enrolled in a graduate or professional school of the college or university which he/she previously attended as an undergraduate student may participate in intercollegiate athletics, provided he/she has eligibility remaining and is within five calendar years of initial full-time collegiate enrollment for Division I and within the first ten full-time semesters of collegiate enrollment for Divisions II and III.

A student-athlete who has eligibility remaining and is within the specified five-year or ten-semester period also may participate while enrolled in a graduate or professional school at a Division I or II college or university other than the institution at which he/she completed an undergraduate degree, provided he/she meets the criteria of the one-time transfer exception to the general transfer residence requirement. That exception is as follows:

The student-athlete must be seeking to participate in a sport other than Division I football, basketball and men's ice hockey, except that a student-athlete who seeks to participate in Division I-AA football may use this exception only if transferring from a Division I-A program.
The student-athlete may not have transferred previously from another four-year institution unless he/she transferred previously and received an exception to the transfer residence requirement because his/her institution either discontinued the sport or did not sponsor the sport in which the student-athlete is a participant.
The student must have been in good academic standing and eligible to compete had he/she decided to remain at the previous institution.
The student-athlete's previous institution must certify in writing that it has no objection to the student-athlete being granted an exception to the transfer residence requirement.
NOTE: This exception does not apply to a student-athlete who attends a Division III institution for graduate school, unless the student-athlete is attending the same institution at which he/she was an undergraduate.

NOTE: If the student-athlete transfers to the certifying institution from a Division III member institution and meets the above-mentioned conditions, he or she may be eligible to compete but may not receive athletically related financial aid during that year.

Please contact the certifying institution or conference for additional information. You also may contact the NCAA membership services staff at 317/917-6222 if you have further questions.

Lindsay
02-18-2009, 01:01 PM
Lindsay, i thought eligibility started once enrolled at taking classes, not 1 year after graduation, but I may be wrong

I see what you're saying. That would need clarification. I got verified that you have a year after high school graduation to begin your eligibility. That is why you see players take ONE year off to decide whether or not they go to college. And there is a problem with foreigners from certain countries because they graduate at different ages, so it creates a problem when they get over here.

pandal3oy
02-18-2009, 02:46 PM
i guess thats y most division I players are so young. good thing for division II, III for not being as strict.

Forza Milan
02-20-2009, 08:09 PM
Yes, you still can. Even if you played 4 years as undergrad.

koreanmilkman2008
03-17-2009, 06:52 AM
so say i went to my community college for the first two years for my general education, i'd still be able to play tennis for college after?

rafazx10
08-24-2013, 08:53 PM
Sorry to bump this but at least i used the search.

Does that mean that since i didnt play for the first two year i attended the college, i am not eligible anymore to play at all?

andfor
08-25-2013, 06:07 AM
I see what you're saying. That would need clarification. I got verified that you have a year after high school graduation to begin your eligibility. That is why you see players take ONE year off to decide whether or not they go to college. And there is a problem with foreigners from certain countries because they graduate at different ages, so it creates a problem when they get over here.

The clock starts ticking against your eligibility upon H.S. graduation, 5 years to complete 4 years of eligibility. Playing for a team or not, it does not matter. Tennis players can sit out 6 months from D1 competition, this is why you see a number of tennis players start during the January semester. If you do not enroll 6 months after graduation you will lose that year of eligibility.

http://www.ncaapublications.com/productdownloads/D113.pdf

Sorry to bump this but at least i used the search.

Does that mean that since i didn't play for the first two year i attended the college, i am not eligible anymore to play at all?

Unfortunately your search produced one of the weaker threads. This has been answered before. It's OK though. Do you have a year of eligibility left? If you are in your 5th year, probably. Are you eligible for D1, D2, or NAIA? I'm not sure. It's common to see an older athlete play for a year or two only because that's all the eligibility they had.

Seriously, this might be the worst place in the world for NCAA eligibility advice. You would be best served by reading the rules, contacting the athletic department where you would be interested in playing, or contact the NCAA membership services staff at 317/917-6222 or 877/262-1492. Once you know, you can better communicate with your perspective coach who will also want to know your eligibility status.

To me, determining college athletic eligibility is such a serious matter for any student athlete serious about playing college sports. I can't understand why someone would trust a random unknown source for this advice.

Hope this helps. Good luck with your college athletic pursuits.

goran_ace
08-25-2013, 05:03 PM
Seriously, this might be the worst place in the world for NCAA eligibility advice. You would be best served by reading the rules, contacting the athletic department where you would be interested in playing, or contact the NCAA membership services staff at 317/917-6222 or 877/262-1492. Once you know, you can better communicate with your perspective coach who will also want to know your eligibility status.

To me, determining college athletic eligibility is such a serious matter for any student athlete serious about playing college sports. I can't understand why someone would trust a random unknown source for this advice.

Agreed. Although I would start with talking to your own coach/administrator.

rodrigoamaral
08-25-2013, 05:11 PM
yes and no.. it varies based on the school and situation... contact your compliance officer!!!

George Opelka
08-25-2013, 05:53 PM
At one point, the NCAA rule was you had 6 years of school (once enrolled) to use 4 years of eligibility. I'm certain the rules have been modified.

rafazx10
08-25-2013, 08:53 PM
Thanks guys, i will see what i can do.

But in case you guys are wondering, here is the situation.

I didnt pursue college tennis right after high school, but ive been playing either club tennis or USTA tournaments by myself.
Right now i am starting my 4th year of college (im taking 5 years to graduate) and having a hard time to find people to play with.

Tryouts for our team is withing a few weeks, i was thinking about just going to it, maybe i could get the 7th or 8th spot on the team just so i could keep playing tennis at a decent level.
No big hopes to make it, but it wouldnt hurt to try, at the very least i would get to meet the coach and he would see me playing. I thought i should make sure im eligible before going through all the trouble.

mhj202
09-10-2013, 06:39 AM
At division 1 institutions, you have 1 year from the time you graduate high school to begin your eligibility. So you can't start playing as a junior or senior, yet alone grad student. You can, however, play as a grad student as long as you started your eligibility in that 1 year window, and you have 5 years to complete that eligibility. I believe there is also a rule that you can compete as a grad student as long as its at the same institution you completed your undergrad. So you can't play at USC for 3 years as an undergrad then transfer to Texas to play your last year as a grad student. The rule refers to transfer students in athletics programs only being undergrads. I have no idea what the rules are at Division 2, 3 or NAIA. They could be very different and I'm sure they are.

Where are you getting this interpretation from? Have you read ByLaw 14.2? The 5 year window begins when you actually first enroll in college full-time and start classes. The high school graduation is just an eligibility factor for playing ncaa sports at all.

andfor
09-10-2013, 07:00 AM
Where are you getting this interpretation from? Have you read ByLaw 14.2? The 5 year window begins when you actually first enroll in college full-time and start classes. The high school graduation is just an eligibility factor for playing ncaa sports at all.

There was some terrible mis-information in the post you quoted. I hope no H.S. or potential college student athlete makes any decision regarding what's posted here about college sports rules, regulations and compliance. For complete understanding of NCAA, NAIA and NJCAA rules, contact your H.S. counseling department or college athletic department compliance officer or college coach where you are interested in participating. Calling the NCAA, NAIA or NJCAA compliance department is also an option.

mhj202
09-10-2013, 08:25 AM
There was some terrible mis-information in the post you quoted. I hope no H.S. or potential college student athlete makes any decision regarding what's posted here about college sports rules, regulations and compliance. For complete understanding of NCAA, NAIA and NJCAA rules, contact your H.S. counseling department or college athletic department compliance officer or college coach where you are interested in participating. Calling the NCAA, NAIA or NJCAA compliance department is also an option.

I think we're on the same page here. I was trying to show the poster of the quote I referenced that he/she was wrong.

Having been through the NCAA compliance process (though many, many years ago), I totally agree with the advice of calling the compliance officer of the college that you're interested in and getting them to counsel you.

andfor
09-10-2013, 09:02 AM
I think we're on the same page here. I was trying to show the poster of the quote I referenced that he/she was wrong.

Having been through the NCAA compliance process (though many, many years ago), I totally agree with the advice of calling the compliance officer of the college that you're interested in and getting them to counsel you.

We are on the same page. I've posted links to NCAA rules too many times to remember. But, they've become increasingly difficult to find. Why I don't book mark them I don't know. Maybe someone could post them and ask the mods to create a sticky. Here's some links that with a little research should have answers to most any prospective or current college student athlete.

NCAA Clearinghouse - http://web1.ncaa.org/ECWR2/NCAA_EMS/NCAA.jsp

NCAA Initial Eligibility - http://www.ncaapublications.com/p-4098-2013-ncaa-initial-eligibility-brochure-road-map-to-initial-eligibility.aspx

NCAA DI, DII, DIII and sport specifc rule books http://www.ncaapublications.com/

ITA Rules Page - http://www.itatennis.com/Coaches/ita_rules.htm

NAIA Clearinghouse - http://www.playnaia.org/

NJCAA Rules Page - http://njcaa.org/todaysNJCAA_Eligibility.cfm?category=Eligibility