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View Full Version : Advice Needed: Serve Wide To Deuce Court


ttbrowne
01-09-2009, 07:44 AM
I can hit this wide deuce side kick serve almost at will (guess I have a natural propensity) while playing doubles at the 3.5-4.0 level. It just started showing up when I started working hard on my kick serves.

I'm just asking those who've used it in doubles to pass along a little advice on how to use it to win points more effectively.
Any ideas?

GPB
01-09-2009, 08:32 AM
Are you a lefty or a righty?

Racer41c
01-09-2009, 09:53 AM
A nice weapon for the 2nd serve.

Failed
01-09-2009, 09:55 AM
Well... the best thing about it is that your opponents can't expect you to hit to their backhand side all the time so they have to be prepared for a wide kicker as well. This keeps them guessing, which is always an advantage. Also, if your kicker jumps sharply right instead of going really high it can jam your opponent, in a same way as a slice serve can when its being hit to their backhand side so that it curves into their body.

larry10s
01-09-2009, 09:56 AM
use the kicker to get to net better with s&v. doesnt have to be wide in doubles up the T is usually better

SlapShot
01-09-2009, 10:09 AM
Kicker or slice? For a right hander, a kicker wide to the deuce would break into the body, which works from time to time. I personally prefer to use a slice out wide that breaks out of the court - especially in doubles. My partner will usually set up to take the volley on that serve, and almost always finds open court with it.

LeeD
01-09-2009, 02:08 PM
If you're right handed and kick duece court to your opponents forehand wide, be prepared to low volley up the middle mostly...short is ok if you keep it low. The returner has to fetch outside the court, then run to cover the middle with his backhand. The partner usually has trouble poaching if you keep your volley low.
When you get a higher ball, go behind the returner short angle, to wrong foot him.
When the return goes wide to your forehand (you are rightie), block it low with control into the down the line alley.

Spokewench
01-09-2009, 02:20 PM
The returner will either hit an angle shot back to you; or will try up the line; if they can get there in time with footwork; but the most likely is that you have really hit them an angle and an angle begets an angle - be ready for that angle and hit it back across to the returners down the line.

I don't really like to hit that type of serve when playing doubles since I'd rather serve down the middle and have the ball come back to me and my partner predictably down the middle. This way my partner and I don't have to move so much and it is more predictable what will come back.

spoke

LeeD
01-09-2009, 03:01 PM
I also don't like the outwide serve unless it gives the returner trouble with a successful crosscourt return.
If you S/V, a return over the net man is almost a winner.
Sometimes, not always, the duece court returner has a real forehand. Slicing out wide, if he knows it's coming, is invitation for a crusher hit 90 mph at your partners racketside hip pocket.
And anything above 4.0, most players DO have good forehands.
Pounding a strength is not a good strategy for me.

Bagumbawalla
01-09-2009, 07:34 PM
In general , in doubles, especially with better opponents, you will want to serve down the middle rather than wide- for a variety of reasons- especially on the deuce side.

The wide kicker is a good change to keep them guessing, but you should not over-do it or, as has been mentioned, they will groove to it and return with a wide crosscourt angle that might be a winner or rip one down the line, also, for a possible winner.

So, hit mostly down the middle, some into the body and then throw in just a few of your kickers for variety.

Much, however, depends on your level of play. At lower levels, you will have more success than with more skilled opponents, so, use your own judjment based on a knowledge of who you are playing.

oneguy21
01-09-2009, 08:20 PM
That's a lot of posts LeeD. Sheesh:shock: You had less than me about two weeks ago, but now your ahead by a lot.

Failed
01-10-2009, 12:20 AM
That's a lot of posts LeeD. Sheesh:shock: You had less than me about two weeks ago, but now your ahead by a lot.

Keep making posts like these and you'll get past him in notime!

ttbrowne
01-10-2009, 04:39 AM
If you're right handed and kick duece court to your opponents forehand wide, be prepared to low volley up the middle mostly...short is ok if you keep it low. The returner has to fetch outside the court, then run to cover the middle with his backhand. The partner usually has trouble poaching if you keep your volley low.
When you get a higher ball, go behind the returner short angle, to wrong foot him.
When the return goes wide to your forehand (you are rightie), block it low with control into the down the line alley.

This is good stuff. I am right handed.
Do you ever have your partner poach? I mean just once in a great while to keep the opponents guessing.

LeeD
01-10-2009, 09:08 AM
Sorry, Oneguy, I don't work, play only 3 hours tennis each day, and have some time to kill normally. I'll try to back off.
Poaching....
First of all, the poacher always has to be able to poachvolley deeper than the service line, and with some penetration, or the poach is not effective.
Most good poachers like to disquise a few faints before actually going. The opposition sees each fake, and usually by the third one, hits one down the line. Be awares.
Some guys are great poachers, some just not effective. Kinda depends how good they volley and how good the return comes back.
And especially, most volleyers are less effective on their backhand side, not all, but be aware the forehand poach is generally more effective.
But if you never poach each 5 points, or never fake it, the opposition can just sit back, relax, and hit out on crosscourt returns.
Remember, tennis is about taking your opponent OUT of his comfort zone, while you try to stay within your limits.

Tennisman912
01-10-2009, 07:50 PM
ttbrowne,

I recommend and use 80-90% kicks and slice serves to the BH of an opponent or whatever their weaker side is. Especially at 3.5-4.0 (and usually higher) no one will be able to hurt you consistently with a serve high to the backhand. And most will give you a relatively easy first volley. That will make your flatter serve, even at less than full pace, very effective. Once they realize you have control, they won’t know what to expect and will be very off balance. Some will tell you not to go to one spot as much as I say but, IMHO, I like to make things as easy as possible for myself and the above does this for me most of the time. However, as you move up, you will need a bit more variety. Also, use more spin than pace generally speaking. More people will have more trouble handling more spin than pace. Make them really have to concentrate and not just block back big serves.

At the higher levels, I stay away from opponent’s FHs except to keep them guessing or going for an ace. Why? Everyone from strong 4.5 and up will crush any forehand they can reach consistently. The more spin than pace mantra will help here too. The better the player, the more they will feed on pace. A big kicker to the forehand and you have a good chance of them being way out in front, especially if they see very few serves to the FH side. I don’t necessarily subscribe to the “in general, go up the middle most of the time” school of thought, unless that is their BH. It amazes me how often some players will keep going up the middle to my forehand even though you consistently return it well when I am on the deuce side (I am a lefty). Just my opinion.

The bottom line is make your opponent beat you with their weaker stroke consistently and your life will get immeasurably easier. Practice until you can place both your 1st and 2nd serve flat, with slice and with topspin, and any combination as needed to the body, their FH and their BH.

Good luck

TM