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Thirteen
01-11-2009, 05:41 AM
Hi all,

I mistimed a forehand today and hit it closer to my body than usual (I usually try to hit as far out as possible) and realised that I had more power hitting that way. It was still in front of my front foot, but I think all the while I was hitting the ball too far out, when my racket starts to decelerate. Is there such a thing? I use a SW grip. Any ideas?

Another thing, I've read that the contact point for an open stance is more in front of the body than the semi open stance. Is this in relation to the head, or the front foot. In my mind, the contact point should remain constant in relation to the head, but since your left foot is farther back, the contact point is farther out in front?

Thanks!

Djokovicfan4life
01-11-2009, 07:18 AM
If I'm not mistaken, the ideal contact point for the forehand is waist height and in line with your left foot, or front foot, as you called it. If you're right handed, that is. I think you've found the right contact point, so don't mess with a winning formula.

JCo872
01-11-2009, 08:04 AM
Hi all,

I mistimed a forehand today and hit it closer to my body than usual (I usually try to hit as far out as possible) and realised that I had more power hitting that way. It was still in front of my front foot, but I think all the while I was hitting the ball too far out, when my racket starts to decelerate. Is there such a thing? I use a SW grip. Any ideas?

Another thing, I've read that the contact point for an open stance is more in front of the body than the semi open stance. Is this in relation to the head, or the front foot. In my mind, the contact point should remain constant in relation to the head, but since your left foot is farther back, the contact point is farther out in front?

Thanks!

Thirteen,

You are absolutely correct about what you discovered. If you are hitting with the modern windshield wiper forehand, the power comes from using the torso and arm to drive through the ball and then over to the opposite side of the body. If you hit the ball too far out in front you lose this power of this driving motion through the ball. Its a lot like punching something. If your contact point is too far out in front you can't drive through the object.

A really good video out there is Tennis Guru by Clint Stephenson. He will tell you the exact same thing.

Jeff

JCo872
01-11-2009, 08:07 AM
Hi all,

I mistimed a forehand today and hit it closer to my body than usual (I usually try to hit as far out as possible) and realised that I had more power hitting that way. It was still in front of my front foot, but I think all the while I was hitting the ball too far out, when my racket starts to decelerate. Is there such a thing? I use a SW grip. Any ideas?

Another thing, I've read that the contact point for an open stance is more in front of the body than the semi open stance. Is this in relation to the head, or the front foot. In my mind, the contact point should remain constant in relation to the head, but since your left foot is farther back, the contact point is farther out in front?

Thanks!

One more thing - can I use your post on my site http://www.hi-techtennis.com? Your discovery supports my instruction on the modern forehand.

Jeff

itisgregory
01-11-2009, 08:08 AM
Thirteen,
By hitting the ball further out in front of your body as opposed to closer you can usually impart more forward momentum and thus speed on the ball because the racquet head is allowed to travel that much further where is it is still gaining speed. The "ideal" contact point is about belly-button level and slightly in front of the left foot (for right-handers) for your grip.

Thirteen
01-11-2009, 01:16 PM
One more thing - can I use your post on my site http://www.hi-techtennis.com? Your discovery supports my instruction on the modern forehand.

Jeff

Sure! I'm just happy I learnt something new=D

Thirteen
01-11-2009, 01:18 PM
Thirteen,
By hitting the ball further out in front of your body as opposed to closer you can usually impart more forward momentum and thus speed on the ball because the racquet head is allowed to travel that much further where is it is still gaining speed. The "ideal" contact point is about belly-button level and slightly in front of the left foot (for right-handers) for your grip.

Yup, I'm still hitting in front of my left foot, but previously I was hitting WAY in front, almost just before my arm is perpendicular to my body.