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View Full Version : Tennis Elbow and hybrids - Help I've read 100's of posts and can't get up


netman
01-12-2009, 03:17 PM
I've just spent several hours reading every post I can find on tennis elbow(TE), stringing to protect TE, hybrids to protect TE, voodoo incantations to help TE, etc., etc. The only consensus seems to be that full gut is the best. After that its anybody's guess/opinion. Unfortunately full nat gut is not an option for me. So what to do?

A little background. I injured my elbow chopping wood. Now anytime I play tennis, I can go for about 2 hours and then its time to quit and ice. Takes a few days for the pain to dissipate, then I'm good again. Problem is I use either a hybrid of Topspin CyberBlue in the mains at 55, CyberFlash in the crosses at 53 (Yonex RDS001 MP) or all CyberBlue at 55 (PK 5g). I hit hard, mostly flat and play a lot of S&V. Since the injury it has become apparent these setups are not going to work for now. I love the control of these setups,they have greatly improved my consistency and they never break. But obviously I need to go with something more forgiving.

So here are my questions for fellow TWers who have dealt with TE:

Does putting a soft string like Sheep Micro 17 in the crosses really soften up a CyberBlue (or any poly) main enough to help TE? Will control suffer?

If doing a CyberBlue/Natural Gut hybrid, where to put the gut for the best combination of control and arm protection? Opinions seem to be all over the map on this one, though gut mains and poly crosses get the most fervent accolades for playability. But wouldn't this be stiffer than the other way around?

What tension to string the nat gut and poly? Currently have the CB mains at 55 and the CF crosses at 53 per Yonex's recommendation to string crosses 5% lower on ISO heads. But I fear this will create a rocket launcher with nat gut mains.

Finally, is there anyway to 2 piece string a PK 5g so you can do a hybrid on it?

Thanks to all for any advice you can offer.
-k-

tennisdad65
01-12-2009, 03:25 PM
Yonex RDS001 MP stiffness is 68? Even the 5G is not that great for TE at 65. you may want to try something lower than 63. Also experiment with lowering your tension to 48-50 range.

You will adjust to a flexier racquet, softer strings (including natural gut), and lower tensions pretty quickly. you have to, or your TE will put an end to your tennis.

I got TE after using POG (flex - 63) with poly at the lowest of the recommended tension. 2 months with a low RA racquet + nat gut + lower tension completely cured my TE. much lower stiffness + full nat gut, even at lower tensions is not that powerfull.

Irvin
01-12-2009, 04:12 PM
Try a larger grip. I had a fried that put a replacement over the top of his grip and built his grip up to about 5" and his tennis elbow went away.

Here is another idea. Put an over grip over your present grip before you do this then put the replacement grip on. That way you can take off the girp and overwrap without damaging your present grip.

Irvin

scotus
01-12-2009, 06:14 PM
You can have poly mains on your PK5 and gut cross at 5-7 lbs tighter than your main and have no problem.

Hatari!
01-12-2009, 07:02 PM
Make sure your technique is correct as well. Taking the ball to late is a major cause of tennis elbow.

tennisfreak15347
01-12-2009, 07:57 PM
if you can, since it's the winter, try to rest two weeks from tennis. the TE isn't going to get any better if you keep playing. Ice it, rub it with bengay to loosen up the tendons, and stretch it out. Luckily for me, I was able to use TF Multifeel for my game and my health to heal up my TE.(using it while I was healing)

Kevo
01-12-2009, 08:16 PM
I don't think any poly is going to be acceptable in your situation. I would suggest some Yonex 850 Pro, or Head Fibergel or Fibergel Power. Those are all soft reasonably priced strings. They won't last as long as poly, but they aren't expensive, and they should be much easier on the arm. There are lots of other similar strings that would work as well, but those are just some of the ones I liked.

Oh, if you wanted to be really cheap, Ashaway Liberty is quite soft for a syn gut, and it's very cheap.

SchreckTennis
01-12-2009, 08:28 PM
...Here is another idea. Put an over grip over your present grip before you do this then put the replacement grip on. That way you can take off the girp and overwrap without damaging your present grip.

Irvin

Speaking of overgrips, to me it seems that the Unique brand WhatAGrip overgrips soak up quite a bit of vibrations, but it seems to twist a little when I hit a ball- a possible remedy to that might be putting a thin layer or two of gauze tape on top of the WhatAGrip, but I didn't think of that until I had already removed it :neutral:

nickarnold2000
01-12-2009, 08:33 PM
Don't use poly at all! I think in the next few years we will be seeing more and more wrist, elbow and shoulder injuries resulting from poly use(I use CP in a hybrid with Forten Sweet and get wicked spin and good control). Try googling "turbo tennis". This month's article and video talks about tennis elbow.

NickC
01-12-2009, 09:53 PM
Use a X-1 16 or nrg2 16 hybrid with VS Team/Touch 16 and string savers. String it really loose (as in below 55 pounds, but above 45 pounds) and then just pop in as many string savers as you see fit. I've used the setup before, it was softer than anything I've ever played before.

Another thing, (not directed towards the OP, but just a rant)



Tennis elbow is a result of bad technique. There's a reason why most high-level players don't have tennis elbow. They have good technique instead. I've worked on my technique for years with coaches and that kind of thing. I've been told I've got really good technique off both wings, and I've played with all kinds of strings, and I don't get tennis elbow. Sure, I don't like the feeling of tight poly (66+), but that's a preference and not due to lack of technique. If you don't have good technique, don't use something that requires it. It's not good for you.

TheRed
01-12-2009, 10:04 PM
Poly should be out of the equation completely. I use the same exact racquet, and find it a bit stiff. But I love this racquet. With stiffer strings, my elbow acts up. You can get pretty good durability out of a soft string if you use RIP control in the crosses. RC seems to lock the mains in, slowing down the sawing process and extending string life.
I want my strings stiffer but I can't handle poly so I use syn gut mains and rip control crosses.

dabudabuda
01-12-2009, 11:13 PM
1+...temporarily do not use any poly. I am not really saying anything new but will give a string recommendation. If gut is out of the equation then try the Isospeed Controls. Both the classic and new are some of more comfortable multis out there. And in the mean time you can work on your technique. Good luck.

Bud
01-13-2009, 12:44 AM
Don't use poly at all! I think in the next few years we will be seeing more and more wrist, elbow and shoulder injuries resulting from poly use(I use CP in a hybrid with Forten Sweet and get wicked spin and good control). Try googling "turbo tennis". This month's article and video talks about tennis elbow.

I agree... especially in younger people who can play for longer durations before debilitating pain sidelines them (as long term damage to their young, supple tendons is slowly inflicted) :twisted:

Bud
01-13-2009, 12:47 AM
Don't use poly at all! I think in the next few years we will be seeing more and more wrist, elbow and shoulder injuries resulting from poly use(I use CP in a hybrid with Forten Sweet and get wicked spin and good control). Try googling "turbo tennis". This month's article and video talks about tennis elbow.

Agree... drop the poly immediately and you'll see a gradual improvement until your TE disappears completely. If you continue to use poly, it will not go away and will progressively get worse.

nickarnold2000
01-13-2009, 08:20 AM
Use a X-1 16 or nrg2 16 hybrid with VS Team/Touch 16 and string savers. String it really loose (as in below 55 pounds, but above 45 pounds) and then just pop in as many string savers as you see fit. I've used the setup before, it was softer than anything I've ever played before.

Another thing, (not directed towards the OP, but just a rant)



Tennis elbow is a result of bad technique. There's a reason why most high-level players don't have tennis elbow. They have good technique instead. I've worked on my technique for years with coaches and that kind of thing. I've been told I've got really good technique off both wings, and I've played with all kinds of strings, and I don't get tennis elbow. Sure, I don't like the feeling of tight poly (66+), but that's a preference and not due to lack of technique. If you don't have good technique, don't use something that requires it. It's not good for you.

I totally agree. The turbo tennis article and video talks in-depth about technique problems being the cause of tennis elbow

netman
01-13-2009, 08:55 AM
Another thing, (not directed towards the OP, but just a rant)



Tennis elbow is a result of bad technique. There's a reason why most high-level players don't have tennis elbow. They have good technique instead. I've worked on my technique for years with coaches and that kind of thing. I've been told I've got really good technique off both wings, and I've played with all kinds of strings, and I don't get tennis elbow. Sure, I don't like the feeling of tight poly (66+), but that's a preference and not due to lack of technique. If you don't have good technique, don't use something that requires it. It's not good for you.



I agree on the technique. Next time instead of a 10 pound maul and wedge to split oak and maple, I'm using a hydraulic log splitter. :)

I agree technique plays a huge part and I wish I could blame it on technique but I've been playing tennis for 40 years and never had TE. I've used frames with 75 stiffness ratings and wooden ones. Frames weighing 14 oz and frames weighing 9.5 oz. Every kind of string from nat gut to kevlar. But I can see where once you have tendonitis, poly can be very hard on the injured tendon.

I appreciate all the advice and will try out some of these suggestions. I currently have some Gosen Sheep Micro 17 on hand, so I'll string up my 5g at a low tension and see how it goes.
USRSA rates it a 199 for stiffness which is way lower than CyberBlue (233). I have a couple of i.Prestige Mids I recently picked up and I'll try them with SM at a low tension as well. And I'll start saving my pennies so I can try out a nat gut hybrid or 2.

Thanks
-k-

hoodjem
01-13-2009, 10:37 AM
Sheep Micro 17 is not that soft.

Skip the poly hybrid route, and if you can't afford nat gut, go full multi.

Look at this list to evaluate stiffness of strings.
http://www.racquetsportsindustry.com/issues/200809/200809allstrings.html

You'll see that Sheep Micro 17 is rated 199, which is fairly crisp.

For a soft non-gut string, I recommend something on the 140-159 range like Iso-Speed Professional 17. Almost anything Polyolefin is soft.
Isospeed Platinum 16 Polyolefin 138
Prince More Feel 16 Nylon / Softflex138
Head Protector 16 Polyolefin 140
Pro Kennex IQ Comfort 17 Polyolefin 142
Head Intellitour 16 Polyolefin 143
Gamma Professional 18 Nylon/Zyex 144
Pro Kennex IQ Element 2 16 Zyex 145
Alpha Gut 2000 18 Nylon 146
Ashaway Dynamite 17 Zyex/Nylon 147
Gamma Asterisk 17 Nylon 150
Isospeed Professional 17 Polyolefin 151
Isospeed Professional 17 Classic Polyolefin 152
Pro Supex Maxim Touch 1.25 Nylon 153
Isospeed Control Classic 16 Polyolefin 154
Isospeed Control 16 Polyolefin 158

netman
01-13-2009, 10:43 AM
Sheep Micro 17 is not that soft.

Skip the poly hybrid route, and go full multi.

Look at this list to evaluate stiffness of strings.
http://www.racquetsportsindustry.com/issues/200809/200809allstrings.html

You'll see that Sheep Micro 17 is rated 199, which is fairly crisp.

For a soft non-gut string, I recommend something on the 140-150 range like Iso-Speed Professional 17. Almost anything Polyolefin is soft.
Isospeed Platinum 16 (Cross) Polyolefin 1.27 138 16.62
Prince More Feel 16 Nylon / Softflex 1.31 138 14.69
Head Protector 16 (Cross) Polyolefin 1.31 140 15.77
Pro Kennex IQ Comfort 17 Polyolefin 1.27 142 14.75
Head Intellitour 16 (Cross) Polyolefin 1.33 143 14.77
Gamma Professional 18 Nylon/Zyex 1.22 144 15.15
Pro Kennex IQ Element 2 16 Zyex 1.30 145 13.12
Alpha Gut 2000 18 Nylon 1.21 146 14.49
Ashaway Dynamite 17 Zyex/Nylon 1.24 147 13.72
Gamma Asterisk 17 Nylon 1.26 150 13.98
Isospeed Professional 17 Polyolefin 1.25 151 15.35
Isospeed Professional 17 Classic Polyolefin 1.27 152 15.06
Pro Supex Maxim Touch 1.25 Nylon 1.25 153 12.13
Isospeed Control (Classic) 16 Polyolefin 1.29 154 15.43
Isospeed Control 16 Polyolefin 1.27 158

Thanks hoodjem. I like crisp strings and have never been happy with soft strings. I've tried a number of the ones you list and just could not use them. I'll see how the SM goes and if it doesn't help I may have to suck it up and re-visit one of these.

-k-

NewGuy
01-13-2009, 12:57 PM
Soft strings, low tension. When my daughter hurt her elbow, we shifted to nxt at 55 when she resumed playing. But, and this is a big but, while rest, ice, ibuprofen will help, but tennis elbow needs to be rehabed properly to get better. Tons of stuff on the internet. Basically, light resistance high repetition exercises-- bands, 2 lb. weights, rubber bands and squeezing foam balls, with ice afterwards will work. Rehabing the shoulders/back/core to keep the body in balance will help even more.

This advice comes from hard earned experience -- she's all better now. :)

netman
01-13-2009, 03:15 PM
OK. Just traded for a 1/2 set of nat gut. BDE Perf 16. So I plan to do a hybrid with Nat Gut and Sheep Micro 16.

Just to be sure. I plan to put the Nat Gut in the mains at 55. Will Should I put the SM in at 60 or just 5% more than the mains? Will this setup be too powerful compared to my CyberBlue at 55 setup?

Thanks
-k-

GeorgeLucas
01-13-2009, 03:54 PM
Ehhh strike the ball properly?? :confused::confused::confused:

Valjean
01-13-2009, 03:58 PM
I'm not sure where you get the idea you should *raise* the tension of Gosen's OG Sheep Micro when employed as a cross string in a hybrid with natural gut. With that modestly resilient Gosen string, which is significantly stiffer than BDE Performance, you could go the other way and drop the cross string tension the 5% you know Yonex recommends. If you don't want to create a "rocket launcher" just raise the overall string tension now by 4-5 lbs. and string the crosses the same as the mains; no way you should want to string the BDE mains the same as your polyester ones, to begin with.

netman
01-13-2009, 04:05 PM
I'm not sure where you get the idea you should *raise* the tension of Gosen's OG Sheep Micro when employed as a cross string in a hybrid with natural gut. You could go the other way; it's not that soft to begin with, and is considerably stiffer than BDE Perfection.

Here, take a peek: http://www.racquetsportsindustry.com/issues/200809/200809allstrings.html

I'm coming from really low powered strings and don't want to turn my frame into a rocket launcher. Since gut is supposed to be so powerful, just want to make sure I don't amplify its power.

-k-

zacinnc78
01-13-2009, 04:55 PM
how old are you and how long ago did the injury happen?at 29 years old i still have a few twinges a year later after getting TE but nothing debilitating.prevention is the best medicine but right now since you already have the injury you need to take care of it properly ...
1.rest ,nobody wants to stop using their arm but the less you use that injured area ,the faster it will heal ...but for most of us,we work and we still want to bang around on the courts to keep sane so ...when playing ,use low tensions,soft strings(anything nonpoly will be gr8 )and be sure to study up on the 1hbh and make sure your hitting out front with weight on front foot
2.use a band-it elbow strap or something similar (i saw more improvement faster when i started using it)wear it all day as long as you are working or using computer mouse or pretty much any activity(keep it tighter the more active you are and loosen up the less) I even wore it to bed a few times if i remember correctly
3.START STRENGTHENING your forearm with the wrist curls ,extensions ,and rubber band /finger spread exercises as soon as you can do them without much discomfort
4.be patient ,you can do all these things and it will still take weeks/months but you will see improvement and eventially be pain free(assuming that u have good tennis technique) and you can eventually get back to the polys(i still stay away from stuff like big bangers ...i use the softer copolys ,namely unique big hitter)

good luck man ive been there ,you can do it

zacinnc78
01-13-2009, 05:00 PM
wow ...i just went back and read your WHOLE post ....i didnt really answer your specific questions but im not gonna delete my original post...maybe somebdy else can use the info lol

good luck anyway (i would try gut mains i think):)

bad_call
01-13-2009, 06:41 PM
I'm coming from really low powered strings and don't want to turn my frame into a rocket launcher. Since gut is supposed to be so powerful, just want to make sure I don't amplify its power.

-k-

FWIW - rip control and multifeel are both low powered and easy on the arm. i've used both after a bout with TE and my arm thanked me.

netman
01-14-2009, 04:00 AM
wow ...i just went back and read your WHOLE post ....i didnt really answer your specific questions but im not gonna delete my original post...maybe somebdy else can use the info lol

good luck anyway (i would try gut mains i think):)

Thanks for the advice and encouragement zacinnc78.

Which soft strings did you find that were a good transition from poly during your rehab?

-k-

Bud
01-14-2009, 04:10 AM
Thanks for the advice and encouragement zacinnc78.

Which soft strings did you find that were a good transition from poly during your rehab?

-k-

Pretty much any string beside poly or kevlar. Even the stiffest/crispest SG/MF is nowhere close to poly or kevlar.

Try Gosen (crisp) mains and something like Forten Sweet (softer) crosses at 55-60 lbs. That will be plenty stiff but will not jar your arm like the poly/kevlar strings.

When doing hybrids, I generally use the stiffer/crisper string in the mains and the softer string in the crosses. It ends up nicely balanced.

scotus
01-14-2009, 08:17 AM
For low-powered multis, try IsoSpeed Control or Professional. I can personally attest to their arm safety.

I have heard plenty of good things about Head Rip Control as well.

jsomrak
01-14-2009, 07:11 PM
most people on this thread have great tennis experience but little medical knowledge. First i would ask if you did this chopping wood one time or do you do it regularly, are you still doing it. does it hurt over the lateral (outer part) of the forearm at the level of the elbow joint? Not the elbow itself. does it hurt on the inside of the arm, or medial side? it could be an ulnar nerve issue,
can you grip the handle strong enough. If indeed it is "tennis elbow" your doing some of the right things, ice and rest, nsaids can help temporarily. See your doctor, and if he agrees its tennis elbow, hell tell you not to play tennis. also arm position is important when you sleep. do not sleep with elbow bent, and do not sit at a desk or chair with your elbow on arm rest. if this doesn't work, and its what i did is accupuncture. i can't tell you for sure since im not looking at your arm, but it can help. you played for years with the same racquet and strings, and suddenly your hurt. its probably not your technique. hope this helps.

Bud
01-14-2009, 08:33 PM
I've just spent several hours reading every post I can find on tennis elbow(TE), stringing to protect TE, hybrids to protect TE, voodoo incantations to help TE, etc., etc. The only consensus seems to be that full gut is the best. After that its anybody's guess/opinion. Unfortunately full nat gut is not an option for me. So what to do?

A little background. I injured my elbow chopping wood. Now anytime I play tennis, I can go for about 2 hours and then its time to quit and ice. Takes a few days for the pain to dissipate, then I'm good again. Problem is I use either a hybrid of Topspin CyberBlue in the mains at 55, CyberFlash in the crosses at 53 (Yonex RDS001 MP) or all CyberBlue at 55 (PK 5g). I hit hard, mostly flat and play a lot of S&V. Since the injury it has become apparent these setups are not going to work for now. I love the control of these setups,they have greatly improved my consistency and they never break. But obviously I need to go with something more forgiving.

So here are my questions for fellow TWers who have dealt with TE:

Does putting a soft string like Sheep Micro 17 in the crosses really soften up a CyberBlue (or any poly) main enough to help TE? Will control suffer?

If doing a CyberBlue/Natural Gut hybrid, where to put the gut for the best combination of control and arm protection? Opinions seem to be all over the map on this one, though gut mains and poly crosses get the most fervent accolades for playability. But wouldn't this be stiffer than the other way around?

What tension to string the nat gut and poly? Currently have the CB mains at 55 and the CF crosses at 53 per Yonex's recommendation to string crosses 5% lower on ISO heads. But I fear this will create a rocket launcher with nat gut mains.

Finally, is there anyway to 2 piece string a PK 5g so you can do a hybrid on it?

Thanks to all for any advice you can offer.
-k-

most people on this thread have great tennis experience but little medical knowledge. First i would ask if you did this chopping wood one time or do you do it regularly, are you still doing it. does it hurt over the lateral (outer part) of the forearm at the level of the elbow joint? Not the elbow itself. does it hurt on the inside of the arm, or medial side? it could be an ulnar nerve issue,
can you grip the handle strong enough. If indeed it is "tennis elbow" your doing some of the right things, ice and rest, nsaids can help temporarily. See your doctor, and if he agrees its tennis elbow, hell tell you not to play tennis. also arm position is important when you sleep. do not sleep with elbow bent, and do not sit at a desk or chair with your elbow on arm rest. if this doesn't work, and its what i did is accupuncture. i can't tell you for sure since im not looking at your arm, but it can help. you played for years with the same racquet and strings, and suddenly your hurt. its probably not your technique. hope this helps.

Thank you for your expert opinion, Dr. Con Descending... :neutral:

Extensive medical knowledge and an expensive 15 minute doctor's appointment isn't necessary to determine whether one probably has tennis elbow. A simple search on the Internet shows the location of the pain and lists the variety of symptoms one may experience with TE... depending on the severity.

Having had a severe case of TE, which is now 90% alleviated, I feel I'm experienced enough to talk about it... considering I figured out how to get rid of it (without seeing a doctor) using knowledge gained from others on this forum who have experienced and rid themselves of this painful malady.

The bottom line is... any poly (or kevlar) string will probably exacerbate an arm or wrist injury on someone prone to such injury, regardless of the injury type or the injury source. The best advice we can give the OP is use a more arm-friendly string and racquet, based on his question.

--> To the OP - yes, a PK 5G can be strung as a 2-piece hybrid. I string mine using the 2-piece method. The PK 5G is an amazing racquet when dealing with wrist or elbow issues and I'd highly recommend at least trying one strung with FULL natural gut while you heal... if you insist on playing tennis injured <---

Also, while you're healing... play with a TE compression band in place (I used the Nike band and it was awesome). It removes much of the pain during play. Also, if you hit with a one-handed backhand... try and switch to a two-handed backhand (even if temporarily). The one-handed backhand is by far the most painful stroke when battling active TE and probably hinders the healing process.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tennis_elbow

netman
01-19-2009, 07:35 AM
Played yesterday with a 5g strung with Sheep Micro 17. Much easier on the arm and better yet I found I liked it better than my poly setups. Elbow feels much better this AM than in the past.

Bud, can you tell me the string pattern you use to 2 piece string your 5g? All I can find are 1 piece instructions. BTW, used your break-in method on the 5g and it played great from the first stroke.

-k-

welcome2petrkordaland
01-19-2009, 09:39 AM
i've read a good bit of this thread but not every single word of it. i don't think anyone mentioned string dampeners. use one, use two. use three. . . i happen to use 5 now and have been able to go back to a full copoly setup.

i know, it sounds weird, but i use 5 dampeners and a tremendous amount of shock is absorbed!

ricardo
06-19-2009, 09:39 PM
i strung my PK 5g at 40 lbs using head intellitour 17g.

i usually put 55 lbs. however, to get more comfort, i tried 40 lbs.

did not notice any loss of control but significant improvement in comfort.

read this:


http://twu.tennis-warehouse.com/learning_center/stringsandpower1.html

it claims that if you reduce string tension from 60 lbs to 30 lbs, which is 50% looser, power increased only by 6%, which is negligible.

conclusion: looser tension significantly increases comfort but negligible effect on power...

I will try 30 lbs next time for my PK 5g and see if it is more comfortable...

ricardo
06-19-2009, 09:44 PM
i've read a good bit of this thread but not every single word of it. i don't think anyone mentioned string dampeners. use one, use two. use three. . . i happen to use 5 now and have been able to go back to a full copoly setup.

i know, it sounds weird, but i use 5 dampeners and a tremendous amount of shock is absorbed!

you may want to read this:

http://www.tennis-warehouse.com/LC/RacquetStringTerms.html

Damping (or Dampening): Generally refers to vibration and/or shock damping. Handle systems, such as Prince's Air+ Comfort Handle, Wilson's Triad Technology with Iso.Zorb and Head's ShockStop are designed to reduce frame shock and vibration before they reach the player's hand. Weight is also effective in decreasing shock and vibration. Rubber string dampers reduce string vibration only - they have no effect on frame shock or vibration (it's simple physics - a 2 gram string damper versus a 250-350 gram racquet striking a 60 gram ball...).


Shock (frame): Initial, high-amplitude oscillation (jarring) of the racquet during or immediately after ball contact. Often confused with frame vibration, frame shock is generally believed to contribute more to wrist, elbow and/or shoulder injuries than vibration. Generally, a smaller, stiffer, lighter racquet strung at high tension will produce more shock than a larger, flexible, lightweight frame strung loosely. Off-center hits also increase the amount of shock transmitted to the hand and arm. In fact, if you can hit the Center of Percussion (COP) area of the sweetspot each time, your shots will be shock-free. Certain handle systems (for example, Prince's Air+ Comfort Handle and Head's ShockStop) are effective in reducing shock before it reaches the hand. Additionally, Wilson's Triad Technology and Pro Kennex's Kinetic System Technology are designed to absorb frame shock. After-market methods of reducing frame shock include adding weight to the frame, lowering string tension, using a thinner gauge string and increasing grip size (to a point) to reduce torque. String vibration dampers are ineffective at reducing or absorbing frame shock.