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View Full Version : Interesting occurence in a match...


brosamj
01-13-2009, 08:39 AM
My partner and I were playing in an Open Doubles tournament. There was a roving umpire that was keeping an eye on a couple of matches. Well, before we started, I saw her talking to our opponents. One of the players kept shaking his head and then he walked away from her muttering. We didn't know what happened, but after the match (we won! Like you all care. :) we asked him what it was about and he was told that he had to move his racket damper. I guess he had it on the 2nd horizontal string of his racket and she told him to move it down to the bottom horizontal string. I am pretty sure that is the actual rule...but I had never seen it enforced but in fact, I don't think I had seen a player do it in the first place. What would have been the benefit of doing that for him? Just curious.

As another note--my partner and I on each crossover would sit for a minute and grab a drink and then go back and play. We noticed that the umpire would take out her stopwatch and time us on each crossover. She never warned us but it got us thinking--how much time can you take on each crossover? Is it 90 seconds, 2 minutes? We weren't sure but it never caused us a problem but I was just wondering.

origmarm
01-13-2009, 08:49 AM
I've only seen it enforced once and that was at a "proper" college county level tournament over here. It's very rare for sure but then most people don't put it in the wrong place so it's not that surprising. I reckon I've only ever seen about 5 people with incorrect dampeners. Sounds like you had a very tight official for this match!

From memory changeovers is 90 seconds. 20 seconds between points (unless you are Nadal, Djoko, Murray etc.. :) ) and 120 seconds for the set.

kylebarendrick
01-13-2009, 08:58 AM
In my first year of playing (3.0) I didn't know any better and I had my dampener in the wrong place. A tournament umpire made me move it as well.

raiden031
01-13-2009, 09:32 AM
I have witnessed an umpire at a usta league championship event ask someone to move their dampener. Can't remember but I think it was at Nationals.

JLyon
01-13-2009, 10:26 AM
A dampner can not be above the first cross string. Also on changeovers you have 90 seconds from the end of the last point to the start of the next game. Typically umpires will call time at 60-75 seconds in order to get the players onto the court and ready to play at the 90 second mark.

sureshs
01-13-2009, 11:07 AM
Technically, a dampener cannot even protrude above the first cross, but this is not enforced even for the pros because the protrusion is needed to hold the string in place.

rallyjunkie
01-13-2009, 11:28 AM
what difference does it make if the dampener is on the second cross? a roving ump made me change it once too at a grass 35s at forest hills. does it really give you an unfair advantage?

spot
01-13-2009, 12:27 PM
If it doesn't make a difference then why do you care about putting it on the wrong cross?

rasajadad
01-13-2009, 12:38 PM
I also learned that you can put as many dampeners on a racquet as you want provided they are properly positioned. I learned this at my sectional last summer when one of my opponents had three on!

blakesq
01-14-2009, 07:26 AM
I guess that the dampner rules are there to prevent a "spaghetti string" type of a racquet, where the ball gets a weird and bizarre spin due to the "stuff" on the string.

what difference does it make if the dampener is on the second cross? a roving ump made me change it once too at a grass 35s at forest hills. does it really give you an unfair advantage?

100Inch
01-14-2009, 08:16 AM
I had an official make me move my rubber-band damper down one string at the start of a match. No big deal.

I also witnessed changeover and "between point" times being measured during a sectional match. This was a tight singles match for a set and a half. It was almost 100 degrees and one guy was incredibly fit, but the other began to cramp in the second set and would take a minute between points and about 5 minutes on changeovers. Ultimately no penalties were assessed since the cramper picked up his pace when he noticed the official timing him.

Cruzer
01-14-2009, 03:00 PM
When you have officials at a playoff or tournament they will not only advise you of you incorrectly placed dampener and time you on changeovers they will make sure you only take a 5 minute warm up, call foot faults when they see them, and advise you of an illegal racquet (e.g. Head Ti S7).

Many people are surprised that officials call all these things that everyone tends to overlook in social tennis but they are rules. What is even more surprising is when someone gets called on one of these rules and they get upset at the official.

SunDog
01-16-2009, 07:30 AM
The actual rule is that the dampner cannot be placed within the pattern of the cross strings. You can put it above the bottom cross - and you can use as many as you like. They just cant be within the pattern of the crossed strings.

origmarm
01-16-2009, 07:38 AM
The actual rule is that the dampner cannot be placed within the pattern of the cross strings. You can put it above the bottom cross - and you can use as many as you like. They just cant be within the pattern of the crossed strings.

So what you are saying is that they can be above the first cross providing they are outside the first main? If so I believe this is correct yes.

SunDog
01-18-2009, 08:36 AM
So what you are saying is that they can be above the first cross providing they are outside the first main? If so I believe this is correct yes.

I am quoting from a decision in the ITF rules of tennis. I interperet it to mean that you cant have a dampener placed anywhere on the racquet inside of which there are main and cross strings intersecting. This basically means you can start at any point on the inside of the frame and go towards the inside of the string bed in any direction along the mains or the crosses until you get an intersecting pair. Then you can go no further inside.

JavierLW
01-18-2009, 09:26 AM
I am quoting from a decision in the ITF rules of tennis. I interperet it to mean that you cant have a dampener placed anywhere on the racquet inside of which there are main and cross strings intersecting. This basically means you can start at any point on the inside of the frame and go towards the inside of the string bed in any direction along the mains or the crosses until you get an intersecting pair. Then you can go no further inside.

Right so logically you can put it above the bottom cross but it has to be outside of the outside main (like origam said), so it would be way off the side.

Otherwise it's impossible for you to put it above the bottom cross without it being in the intercecting string pattern.

Alexio92
01-18-2009, 10:18 AM
I am quoting from a decision in the ITF rules of tennis. I interperet it to mean that you cant have a dampener placed anywhere on the racquet inside of which there are main and cross strings intersecting. This basically means you can start at any point on the inside of the frame and go towards the inside of the string bed in any direction along the mains or the crosses until you get an intersecting pair. Then you can go no further inside.

Well what if the racquet only had one cross? :-?

SunDog
01-19-2009, 09:34 AM
Right so logically you can put it above the bottom cross but it has to be outside of the outside main (like origam said), so it would be way off the side.

Otherwise it's impossible for you to put it above the bottom cross without it being in the intercecting string pattern.

He said "first main" not "outside main." People may have been confused by that choice of terminology - especially since some people (like racquet stringers) refer to the middle two main strings as "the first mains."

I was just trying to clear that up for those folks. While the rules of tennis may not be all that well written (hence all of the decisions), the decisions are usually pretty clear.

sureshs
01-19-2009, 10:04 AM
Strictly speaking, the most commonly used setup, in which the dampener holds the last cross and the middle two mains, is illegal, because the dampener protrudes into the area above the last cross. To be correct, it has to be completely below the last cross, and not touching it.

SunDog
01-19-2009, 10:09 AM
While the rules of tennis may not be all that well written (hence all of the decisions), the decisions are usually pretty clear.

Okay - maybe I was wrong.