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View Full Version : How to play: Bouncy and energetic, or calm and loose?


ogruskie
01-16-2009, 09:38 PM
Another question about match play that relates to playing pushers.

Usually when I play, I try to be bouncy and energetic, just running all over the place. I grunt, and just try to kill every ball I get. This either works with absolute success, or I fail miserably. However being too exciting causes me to sometimes overhit or really choke.

On the other hand, I play much better when I'm calm and loose. I never grunt, never jog back to the baseline after the point ends, or fist pump. I merely look at the ground and just walk to the baseline while exhaling deeply. I look and act very indifferent. However, sometimes being too loose can develop lazy footwork. And lazy footwork is key to losing against pushers...

So I'm not really sure how to behave on court...

Mansewerz
01-16-2009, 10:38 PM
IMO, calm, yet energetic, quick feet, and loose.

Federer style.


And why do you fist pump? I typically don't, unless it's a serious match.

ogruskie
01-16-2009, 10:44 PM
IMO, calm, yet energetic, quick feet, and loose.

Federer style.


And why do you fist pump? I typically don't, unless it's a serious match.

Eh, its just a little motivator. I mean, I don't fist pump after every single point, or every other point. Once in a while when I get a good rally going and I win, I'll shake my fist close to my body as a way of telling myself that I'm playing well.

Mansewerz
01-16-2009, 10:48 PM
Eh, its just a little motivator. I mean, I don't fist pump after every single point, or every other point. Once in a while when I get a good rally going and I win, I'll shake my fist close to my body as a way of telling myself that I'm playing well.

Oh, ok, I thought you went full on Nadal haha.



Hmm, I typically play calm, but I do get ****ed at myself.

ogruskie
01-16-2009, 10:53 PM
Oh, ok, I thought you went full on Nadal haha.

Hmm, I typically play calm, but I do get ****ed at myself.

Same with me, although I think I've improved my on-court anger management. I can stay relaxed for a while, but once I get a little ****ed, I simply self-destruct and its game over.

Captain Tezuka
01-16-2009, 10:56 PM
Hey,

Your having problems deceiding on what type think usually are you more energetic and bouncy or calm and collected? Also think of what the opponent would like you to do pushers are usually the calm and collected type exception advanced pushers i.e. retrievers and counterpunchers.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mansewerz
IMO, calm, yet energetic, quick feet, and loose.

Federer style.

I would also agree on this for the calm and collected style of play while I'd suggest the Andy Roddick or Lleyton Hewitt style for the energetic, bouncy and fist-pumping play style. I know you don't do it evey time. :lol:

ogruskie
01-16-2009, 11:10 PM
Hey,

Your having problems deceiding on what type think usually are you more energetic and bouncy or calm and collected? Also think of what the opponent would like you to do pushers are usually the calm and collected type exception advanced pushers i.e. retrievers and counterpunchers.

I would also agree on this for the calm and collected style of play while I'd suggest the Andy Roddick or Lleyton Hewitt style for the energetic, bouncy and fist-pumping play style. I know you don't do it evey time. :lol:

Like I said, I get cocky and inconsistent when I'm too energetic. This causes me to become nervous during bad plays, and lose. On the other hand, being too calm makes me lazy.

I noticed that pushers feed off of my tense and nervous behavior. They get more confident and that's bad... What I started doing lately was showing no emotion regardless of whether I win or lose. I let my opponent be the one to self-destruct from frustration...

kelz
01-16-2009, 11:14 PM
Unless you're very confident in your abilities, I would opt for the bouncy and energetic approach to tennis..

Morrowreze
01-17-2009, 02:08 AM
Personally, I think I'm energetic during the points and pretty much dead in-between them. I don't see why you can't have a little of both.

superlobber
01-17-2009, 02:15 AM
Drink a couple can of RedBull and you are ready to go. good luck.

superlobber
01-17-2009, 02:15 AM
Drink a couple can of RedBull and you are ready to go. good luck.

superlobber
01-17-2009, 02:15 AM
Drink a couple can of RedBull and you are ready to go. good luck.

Morrowreze
01-17-2009, 02:49 AM
Drink a couple can of RedBull and you are ready to go. good luck.

Ha ha. That is a horrible horrible Idea. A guy on my tennis team mixed Zipfizz with a redbull before a tennis match. He won the first set 6-4 and jumping all over the place, doing push-ups after winning points, pumping his fist and stuff. The second set he crashed though, lost it 6-0 or 6-1. that first set was really funny to watch though.

fuzz nation
01-17-2009, 07:53 AM
Ha ha. That is a horrible horrible Idea. A guy on my tennis team mixed Zipfizz with a redbull before a tennis match. He won the first set 6-4 and jumping all over the place, doing push-ups after winning points, pumping his fist and stuff. The second set he crashed though, lost it 6-0 or 6-1. that first set was really funny to watch though.

I think that if a guy was doing that against me, I'd be inclined to decommission a racquet over his skull. Must have been pretty funny though...

ogruskie: I think you answered your own question a little bit. Calm and loose is usually good for staying focused on the game plan, at least for singles. Too often when I see players consciously trying to project too much confidence, they distract themselves - they're not really concentrating on their tennis. The bouncy and energetic approach can be good for doubles where it's healthy for partners to keep each other motivated, but you need to be reasonable. If you're trying to assume some personality on the court that just isn't you, then you're acting, not playing the game. As long as you're not overcooking it, bouncy and energetic can be a form of "loose".

Something that you can work on is facing the demon where you decide to get PO'd and your game goes away. If you can be a little bit more aware of that toxic attitude sneaking in on you, it can be diffused as long as you are realistic with your plan and your expectations. Don't be passive about that anger creeping in - recognize it instead. That's just your brain trying to distract itself and make you "check out" of the match. It can be the result of a few different things including not being ready for a big win and the recognition that can come with it. I remember having huge problems with beating a mentor who taught me growing up. Some players are actually hooked on the consolation they get after they lose - nice try, that's okay, you'll do better next time, etc. Some of this stuff is worse than a weak backhand!

If you decide to give in to the anger, you're deciding to wreck your game. Get a little more comfortable with the fact that you're going to miss occasionally. No biggie. All you can do when you get mad at yourself is fixate on what you're doing wrong and since most of us can only focus on one thing at a time, you pretty much can't fix anything while you're PO'd at yourself. Learn to laugh off the miscues and you can tap into your better skills.

LeeD
01-17-2009, 01:48 PM
Depends how you play.
I see lots of big, strong guys constantly trying to calm down and play within themselves. They are the guys who can hit winners anytime from anywhere, but miss some too.
Then I see the littler guys jump and bounce, but they are really consistent, keep the ball in play, and more energy would only make them faster and quicker, their balls don't go out anyways.
Me, I am skinny and lightweight, but old style gives me plenty of winners from anywhere, so I gotta calm down, slow down, focus inwards, and play each point in a calm, settled, consistent manner. Winners are easy to attain, but my devil is all my missed shots.

joshburger
01-17-2009, 01:52 PM
if its a practice match, i am totally positive and not carless, but if i make a stupid mistake i do not care soo much. in a serius match, i try to be nergetic in a positive way, without getting down on myself in bad situations. another thing to do is the borg/federer midset and show little or no emotion which may be effective in getting in the head of an oppponent

tsongaali
01-17-2009, 07:00 PM
Wow, no offense, but didn't you learn enough from your last post (50 something posts!). If I were you I would be like Hewitt. If your opponent's game ****es you off, why can't you get back at them?
Also, it's pretty obvious from your comments that you will be beaten 9 times out of 10 by a counterpuncher. I like to play defensively since I win way more. Hitting as hard as you can is not a clutch strategy either, unless you're a pro. Why don't you work on consistency, and as for your mental game, just don't give up!

Steady Eddy
01-17-2009, 07:03 PM
Are those the only choices? What about nervous and tight? Too much nervousness will hurt your game, and can be dealt with by consuming alcohol.

ronalditop
01-17-2009, 08:24 PM
when i play im calm down and relaxed, i almost never grunt, just sometimes when serving, i only celebrate really important points, i congratulate my opponent when he makes a great shot.

i guess i try to imitate federer's attitude.

Bagumbawalla
01-18-2009, 09:14 PM
Well, you should be calm, but not sluggish, energetic, but not "spaztic", have some bounce, but just enough to stay light on your feet, and loose, but not "loosey-goosey".

As in most aspects of life, you don't hace to be exclusively one thing or another.

Especially in the summer heat, saving energy is important. Energy, then, should be expended when, and in the direction which, it will do the most good.

If you develop good, consistant strokes, then it should not matter how hard you hit the ball. The stroke should be exactly the same.

You should be relatively loose in your shot-making. Obviously, you don't want to be tense or "muscle" the ball. But if you are going to be loose, then concentration and timing are really important. Mentally, you should not be loose. Calm, maybe, but not loose.

ogruskie
01-18-2009, 09:28 PM
Well what motivated me to do the whole "calm/loose" thing was watching Tsonga play in the AO '08, the semi's and finals. He'd sometimes look SO relaxed that it appeared as if he was just standing there and slapping the ball. So while playing a match I kinda visualized myself being Tsonga, and I was incredibly "free" when hit the ball. My body wasn't tight at all...just...loose. It helped tremendously with consistency and mental focus.