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anbu4ever11
01-16-2009, 10:02 PM
so i was watching james blake signature shot video on the tube and he was talking about the first thing he learned was to sit and lift.meaning bend your legs and then lift up and hit.as he was hitting his forehands it seemed that as the ball was still coming and he was initiating and going through his forehand his legs were lifting before he made contact. so my question is are your legs suppose to lift up before you hit the ball in all circumstances or just in the case of well things higher then however far you bend your legs?also is lifting up something you have to force yourself to do on each shot or something that becomes natural?

fuzz nation
01-17-2009, 11:53 AM
The "lifting" idea is more associated with the modern forehand than a classic motion that encourages forward weight transfer through the stroke. Personally, I like to think of getting off my back foot to hit my forehand well and even though this is a little more old-school, it also requires my initiating the stroke with my legs for generating the best shot. I like to think that because my biggest muscle groups are in my lower half, that's what I need to tap into for my best energy source. Regardless of your type of stroke, you need to engage your legs before the ball shows up to churn out good power or you'll be "arming" the ball too much.

anbu4ever11
01-17-2009, 03:04 PM
so when you bend your legs regardless of any style is it from naturally swinging to hit the ball that ones legs lift up or is it dependant on the height of the ball as to when you lift?idk how to really put it best but i def get what you are saying on engaging ones legs to gain good power i just dont get when one is suppose to lift.

fuzz nation
01-17-2009, 05:26 PM
Hard to explain - I don't subscribe too heavily to the modern fh myself. My general impression of the modern stroke is that the lift happens more during the forward swing. By contrast, the active phase in the legs for a traditional forehand is the forward drive that's just ahead of the swing. I'd say try to find some slo-mo video on youtube or an instructional site where you can replay the progression once or twice. That should let you look at what the lower and upper halves of the player are doing when they swing.

Yeah, you want to stand up taller for a higher ball, but leaving your knees straight isolates your legs and doesn't let them make much power. It's obviously okay if they go straight after they've helped to drive the stroke. One of the best things to remember for controlling a higher ball is to take a higher backswing so that you don't come up from too far underneath the ball.

albino smurf
01-18-2009, 06:00 AM
Sounds like loading up power with your legs to me. I think the weigt transfer forward is the same it is just allowing both legs to get involved instead of just the back. He has a very open forehand too.

anbu4ever11
01-18-2009, 12:23 PM
thanks for the info ive been trying to see in slow mo videos and it does seems like they lift from the actual swing so im just going to give it a whirl next time i hit.i think before id force myself to lift instead of it coming naturally but i wont know till i hit.either way thanks a ton for the feedback appreciate it.

habib
01-20-2009, 04:41 PM
thanks for the info ive been trying to see in slow mo videos and it does seems like they lift from the actual swing so im just going to give it a whirl next time i hit.i think before id force myself to lift instead of it coming naturally but i wont know till i hit.either way thanks a ton for the feedback appreciate it.

I'm surprised that there are so many...perplexed opinions in this thread. Look, the 'sit and lift' refers to the main source of power generation in a modern forehand - your legs. Here's an example of Blake hitting a forehand, it's not the best example, but it still shows what "sit and lift" refers to: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EaUH9Bevnew - it's

Notice that Blake's torso doesn't start rotating and bringing the arm/racquet forward until his legs start pushing him up - the legs pushing off from the ground (not necessarily leaving the ground) produce the torque and force to rotate the torso.

Hence, "sit" -> bend your legs, "lift" -> use your legs to lift your body and power the stroke.

C-XIII
01-20-2009, 08:10 PM
I had the same question actually i was confused on that.