PDA

View Full Version : Holy tension lost K Gut!


Say Chi Sin Lo
01-18-2009, 06:50 PM
Just want to know if this is normal for K Gut. I mean it is a a multifilament and all and I do like the way it plays. But... well here's my description

So I strung it up, and you know as you run your cross through the main, it'll create little dents on the mains as you pull on the crosses. Well those little dents are visible almost an entire hole down. I did pre-stretch it.

Is this normal for this string?

jim e
01-18-2009, 06:56 PM
Just want to know if this is normal for K Gut. I mean it is a a multifilament and all and I do like the way it plays. But... well here's my description

So I strung it up, and you know as you run your cross through the main, it'll create little dents on the mains as you pull on the crosses. Well those little dents are visible almost an entire hole down. I did pre-stretch it.

Is this normal for this string?

I strung this string up for a while, and did not experience this problem.
Did you fan your crosses as you pulled the string excess across? Otherwise you can burn the mains by pulling straight across the mains.That string has more ghosting from the clamps than a lot of other strings out there, but never had that problem.
I also push the cross string towards the previous cross while tension is being pulled so when the tension is done pulling,(is a constant pull machine), the cross string is very straight, and was not in any single line for any amount of time to end up with a string burn.This also helps keep uniform tension as if you straighten the crosses later it can cause an inconsistant string tensions on the crosses.

Say Chi Sin Lo
01-18-2009, 07:09 PM
It's not the cross that I'm worried about (besides, it's a different string, I'm hybriding)

My question is that little dents on the mains are traveling significantly, which to me, means tension lost.

jim e
01-18-2009, 07:13 PM
It's not the cross that I'm worried about (besides, it's a different string, I'm hybriding)

My question is that little dents on the mains are traveling significantly, which to me, means tension lost.

Yes the mains I know. But you have to fan the cross strings while you pull the excess strings through, otherwise you will burn little notches in the mains like you described.If you keep the cross strings moving while you are installing them, and push them towards the previous cross while being pulled , you will eliminate string burn on the mains, and end up with straighter crosses, that helps with tension as well.
After a while softer strings will notch, after a certain amount of time as well, causing what you have described.But early on, after just strung up, can be caused by string burn.

Say Chi Sin Lo
01-18-2009, 07:19 PM
Yeah I know about fanning the cross. I dont do it because to be honest, it hurts my fingers and my cross string is RIP Control. I have done it before and the gain is not significant enough for me.

I've used other strings before and I almost always see those little dents on the mains, but I've never seen them travel down one hole down.

It's no big deal to me, I'll just string a little tighter to anticipate for the lost of tension. I'm just surprised that's all...

Valjean
01-18-2009, 07:24 PM
It's not the cross that I'm worried about (besides, it's a different string, I'm hybriding)

My question is that little dents on the mains are traveling significantly, which to me, means tension lost.
Why don't you get the Stringmeter (or its Gamma equivalent), or some other stringbed measurer, in order to go by something more objective and less reliant on interpretation?

jim e
01-18-2009, 07:24 PM
Yeah I know about fanning the cross. I dont do it because to be honest, it hurts my fingers and my cross string is RIP Control. I have done it before and the gain is not significant enough for me.

I've used other strings before and I almost always see those little dents on the mains, but I've never seen them travel down one hole down.

It's no big deal to me, I'll just string a little tighter to anticipate for the lost of tension. I'm just surprised that's all...

If it hurts your fingers, there is a blunt awl, an off set tool, that is used to do this as well. I always just use my fingers, but some of the tour stringers use that tool, as the great # of racquets they string in a short amount of time can take its toll out on the fingers,. You may want to consider a tool as such, as burning the mains will shorten the life span of any string, wheather it is visable with a softer string, or not as visable with a stiffer string, it will effect the life of the string.
Don't you want to do the best job that you can?

Say Chi Sin Lo
01-18-2009, 07:34 PM
Like i said, the gain is not significant enough for me to go through all the trouble.

But alright, so can anyone answer the question? K Gut is just not good at holding tension? Compared to other multifilament?

Mansewerz
01-18-2009, 07:37 PM
What do you mean they travel one hole down? Is the notch over a large area?

Say Chi Sin Lo
01-18-2009, 07:48 PM
What do you mean they travel one hole down? Is the notch over a large area?

Uhh... imagine marking your mains with a marker, then after X amount o days, that mark moves down a hole... That's what I meant by the notch moving down a hole.

I dont know, look at your racquet and you'll get it

Valjean
01-18-2009, 07:48 PM
Like i said, the gain is not significant enough for me to go through all the trouble.

But alright, so can anyone answer the question? K Gut is just not good at holding tension? Compared to other multifilament?
See for yourself here: http://www.racquetsportsindustry.com/issues/200809/200809allstrings.html

jim e
01-18-2009, 07:49 PM
http://www.racquetsportsindustry.com...llstrings.html
From this you can see all strings lose tension, some more than others.
Its the resilency that matters the most as that makes it more playable.
Nat. gut is on one end, and polys are on the other end, with multis in the middle of the range as far as resilency is concerned.
This tension loss on the chart is only after 200 seconds, and then hit with 5 times.So you can see that all strings will lose tension in its early stages.You can string it tighter if that is what you want, as it is all relative. If you like the way it hits once the initial loss is there, then keep it the way it is.