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zeratul90
01-18-2009, 07:09 PM
Ok so at my lesson today, my coach said that i should switch to a 2hbh. After like 20mins into the bh session today, he asked me to do a 2hbh (i use 1hbh) and said that even though i might've never used it, i'm a natural at it. He said that to get the timing correct and polish my 1hbh will be hard and take a long time, but with my 2hbh its much easier and if i kept getting lessons i could get it down and better than my current 1hbh within roughly a month.

So, those who use a 2hbh and those who used to use a 1hbh but use 2hbh, can you give me some tips? I've noticed that the range of my 2hbh is much less than my 1hbh, so that's going to take some getting used to, handling low balls is a bit of a problem too. Should i use my 1hbh on those? Anything else that you find you had to get used to with the 2hbh would help as well, thanks!

Mansewerz
01-18-2009, 07:24 PM
This kind of makes me a little angry. I know it shouldn't, but it gets annoying that more and more coaches keep shunning the one hander and advise the two hander.

I know that the one hander is harder to learn, and that it's easier to get better faster with a 2 hander, but this is one of the reasons why tennis today seems so homogenized.

Take what I said for what it's worth. I'm no expert. I don't know the OP personally, and hell he may be a real natural at the 2 hander. I'm a 16 year old junior with a 2 hander as well, it just seems that the one hander is not given a chance.

Mansewerz
01-18-2009, 07:26 PM
Ok so at my lesson today, my coach said that i should switch to a 2hbh. After like 20mins into the bh session today, he asked me to do a 2hbh (i use 1hbh) and said that even though i might've never used it, i'm a natural at it. He said that to get the timing correct and polish my 1hbh will be hard and take a long time, but with my 2hbh its much easier and if i kept getting lessons i could get it down and better than my current 1hbh within roughly a month.

So, those who use a 2hbh and those who used to use a 1hbh but use 2hbh, can you give me some tips? I've noticed that the range of my 2hbh is much less than my 1hbh, so that's going to take some getting used to, handling low balls is a bit of a problem too. Should i use my 1hbh on those? Anything else that you find you had to get used to with the 2hbh would help as well, thanks!

Crap, i just realized that I didn't really help you in that last post. For those low balls, i'd slice. Work that slice as much as you can. Who cares if you can hit a good top spin 2 hander on a shot, use the slice a lot. Practice it. Then practice some more. In the end of the day, you should have a very good slice and a very good backhand. This gives you a great back up plan for low balls, for balls that you need to reach for, and for changing it up.

Ballinbob
01-18-2009, 07:28 PM
^^ its a really hard stroke to learn. If I could hit a 2hbh I would, but my 2hbh is 100x worse than my 1hbh (if you can even imagine that). Its going to be along time before I get my 1hbh up to par with my forehand and serve.... The only thing I like about it is that its a pretty stroke, but other than that a 2hbh owns it I think. Its sucha blasted hard stroke to get down.....

edit-OP, go with the 2hbh. Believe me, the 1hbh is really hard to get down and it tends to break down alot for most people. Tell me how many people at the club level have a 1hbh as their weapon? Less than 1%. Just work on those low balls and you'll be fine. Especially if your a natural at it, just stick with it

zeratul90
01-18-2009, 07:51 PM
This kind of makes me a little angry. I know it shouldn't, but it gets annoying that more and more coaches keep shunning the one hander and advise the two hander.

I know that the one hander is harder to learn, and that it's easier to get better faster with a 2 hander, but this is one of the reasons why tennis today seems so homogenized.

Take what I said for what it's worth. I'm no expert. I don't know the OP personally, and hell he may be a real natural at the 2 hander. I'm a 16 year old junior with a 2 hander as well, it just seems that the one hander is not given a chance.

Well actually my coach uses the 1hbh, but he said it took him like 2 or 3 years to completely master (or something similar). Oh and when you talked about the slice, I'm assuming its a 1h slice? i've heard of some people doing it 2h but making sure.

mg.dc
01-18-2009, 07:58 PM
Actually, I think the two-hander is technically the hardest shot in tennis. There's more to hitting a two-hander than a one-hander. Although I think hitting an average two-hander rather easy, to get the stroke refined, on the other hand -- that is, at a high level of play -- is a difficult and long process.

The one-hander is most difficult, in my view, for two particular reasons: (1) high balls, and (2) young age and not yet developed arm strength.

But regardless of my general view, perhaps your coach knows best and you should consider his advice.

As for low balls: slice! The one-hander backhand slice is a great shot -- defensively and offensively. Watch how Federer in particular, but also Gonzales, use the slice backhand offensively. Great stuff indeed.

Hope this helps.

makinao
01-18-2009, 08:44 PM
I learned with, and used a 2hbh until my mid-30s. But when I fractured my left middle finger (from catching a tennis ball in flight) I had to re-learn a 1hbh. Now I have both. I still use a 2hbh for returns and most ground strokes. I have a flat and topspin version. In doubles, I use it almost 100% of the time. From the ad court (my favorite side), my best shots are a short dipping topspin that forces the net player to hit up, a short angle flat crosscourt, and a high topspin backhand that forces the server backwards.

I use my 1hbh during warm-up because it forces me to take the ball in front, and smoothen my stroke. I have a slice version, and a flat one. These are used when stretched wide, or when I have time to set up for a medium pace but deep ground stroke. I use this only about 10% in singles. But there is an element of surprises, so some opponents are thrown off when I use it.

I'm not going to comment on your coach's advice, since I've never seen you play. But it wouldn't hurt developing both. Variety is the spice of life.....

Mansewerz
01-18-2009, 08:49 PM
Well actually my coach uses the 1hbh, but he said it took him like 2 or 3 years to completely master (or something similar). Oh and when you talked about the slice, I'm assuming its a 1h slice? i've heard of some people doing it 2h but making sure.

yes, the one handed slice. And that's why you should take my advice for what it's worth because you're coach seems to know a fair share about your game and OHBHs.

Actually, I think the two-hander is technically the hardest shot in tennis. There's more to hitting a two-hander than a one-hander. Although I think hitting an average two-hander rather easy, to get the stroke refined, on the other hand -- that is, at a high level of play -- is a difficult and long process.

The one-hander is most difficult, in my view, for two particular reasons: (1) high balls, and (2) young age and not yet developed arm strength.

But regardless of my general view, perhaps your coach knows best and you should consider his advice.

As for low balls: slice! The one-hander backhand slice is a great shot -- defensively and offensively. Watch how Federer in particular, but also Gonzales, use the slice backhand offensively. Great stuff indeed.

Hope this helps.

Agreed. it's easy to get in the court, but hard to make into a weapon. But the thing about low level tennis is that it's about consistency.

Nanshiki
01-18-2009, 09:20 PM
The two-hander is the *simplest* shot in tennis IMO. Just grip it and rip it.

The one-hander takes precision and finesse.

I use two-handers for hitting short, slow balls (extra control) and for hitting reliable topspin shots, and I use one-handers on the low, deep balls that I can hit flat right over the net at first-serve speeds, and slice shots, etc.

zeratul90
01-19-2009, 06:53 AM
Thanks for the advice so far guys! Also, is there much difference between how to hit crosscourt and down the line for 1hbh and 2h? I learned how to control the direction of my 1h fairly easy, but all my hits on my 2hbh seem to be going crosscourt (maybe its just my mentality? or is there something different i need to do in my strokes for dtl? Coach hasn't taught me that much about it yet). Thanks!

LeeD
01-19-2009, 08:00 AM
Yeah, low balls, nobody charging the net, use one handed slice.
For all twohanders, simply turn the shoulders and hit with the OTHER hand that you normally hit with. Simple straight back prep at first, then simple straight forward and thru the ball, either topped, side, or a little sliced, whatever feels natural.
You gotta take 1/2 more steps to reach wide balls, then 1/2 more to get back to position.
You grip should be predicated by your off hand grip, so some people switch their main hand grip, other's don't. It's up to you.
Advantage gained in two hander is instant more control, your body goes into the shot more naturally, you have a topspin lob off that side, and you can hit balls with very little leg and trunk preparation.
Main disadvantage for me is less reach, and for an old guy, that 1/2 step is impossible to regain, ever.

Rickson
01-19-2009, 08:21 AM
Your coach is a jerk.

LeeD
01-19-2009, 08:33 AM
Maybe not a jerk, but lazy as all heck for sure.....
Most high school tennis coachs wish they could be the football coach.
So they don't care really. They read most juniors use a two hander for instant gratification, so they don't want to DEVELOP the youngster, they just want him to be the best right now, to heck with later.
Then again, it's easy to coach a team full of two handers. Even one good one hander throws a wrench into the equation, maybe adding questions from the other players about the one hander and causing a whole slew of philosophical discussions, which the coach doesn't want to hear.
I think, if the player uses a one hander, and it's weak compared to his forehand, the coach's job is to inform the player that it takes TIME to develop a well rounded onehander, and a two hander is instant gratification.
Then give the player the OPTION to play now, or later.

ThA_Azn_DeViL
01-19-2009, 08:38 AM
^^ its a really hard stroke to learn. If I could hit a 2hbh I would, but my 2hbh is 100x worse than my 1hbh (if you can even imagine that). Its going to be along time before I get my 1hbh up to par with my forehand and serve.... The only thing I like about it is that its a pretty stroke, but other than that a 2hbh owns it I think. Its sucha blasted hard stroke to get down.....

edit-OP, go with the 2hbh. Believe me, the 1hbh is really hard to get down and it tends to break down alot for most people. Tell me how many people at the club level have a 1hbh as their weapon? Less than 1%. Just work on those low balls and you'll be fine. Especially if your a natural at it, just stick with it

Technically the mechanics in the one-handed groundstroke is simpler than the two-handed one, but simply the fact that people want to smash their one-handed backhand has made it less popular because idiots want to go for everything they see. Even my coach stresses everyone to use a 2 handed backhand, while i use both, i am definitely more one-handed.

To the OP: its up to you to listen to your coach, i myself started off two-handed, then switched to one hander, and finally just got used to doing both. From my experience just stay with what you got, learning something new just makes it all the more difficult for you in tennis.

zeratul90
01-26-2009, 04:35 PM
Alright well i'm starting to get more consistent with my 2hbh. But a new problem is coming up - i can't seem to generate enough power. My coach told me to have my right hand guide and my left lead (assuming that means the power is coming from my left). But the problem is that my left arm seems to be pretty damn week and i can't seem to generate enough power.

I've tried using my left arm alone to try to strengthen it gripping it the same way as i would in a 2h, but it seems that its too weak to handle my racquet (roughly 12oz? maybe a bit more?). Should i try using a lighter racquet? Or should i try to strength my left through weights/exercise?

With that in mind, is there such thing as racquets that are more friendly (best way i could think of putting it) with 2hbh's?

LeeD
01-26-2009, 04:58 PM
EVERY good player, their one handed forehand is more powerful than their two hander. However, the two hander can be more consistent and also have more variety of shots.
Sure, with two hands, you don't have the same leverage to hit hard. Don't believe it? Try serving two handed.
But if your two hander can be more consistent, can hit more varied shots, maybe that's not all that bad.
Main shortcoming is reach. That 1/2 step.
Even on the volley, especially half volleys, the two hander is stronger and more consistent. Only the really wide volley, and one hit hard directly at you, is the one hander a match.
Some two handed volleyers.... Connors, McMillan, Mayer. The latter two were GREAT doubles players, with unreal volley angles and quickness.

Ballinbob
01-26-2009, 06:31 PM
A 2hbh is not as powerful as a 1hbh, so its normal you don't have the same power on your 2hander. I would suggest practicing left handed forehands until you get pretty good at them and double checking your technique. The vast majority of the time its the technique that holds the player back and not really muscle strength.

mixertefera
01-26-2009, 06:52 PM
i hit a 2h backhand and i can produce plenty of pace the many thing is to get your body going in to the shot. also you said your left hand was weak i had that problem to and as it got stronger my 2h got better

mixertefera
01-26-2009, 06:54 PM
one other thing just pick one and stick with and then get work hard on your slice backhand.

Djokovicfan4life
01-26-2009, 09:32 PM
^^ its a really hard stroke to learn. If I could hit a 2hbh I would, but my 2hbh is 100x worse than my 1hbh (if you can even imagine that). Its going to be along time before I get my 1hbh up to par with my forehand and serve.... The only thing I like about it is that its a pretty stroke, but other than that a 2hbh owns it I think. Its sucha blasted hard stroke to get down.....

edit-OP, go with the 2hbh. Believe me, the 1hbh is really hard to get down and it tends to break down alot for most people. Tell me how many people at the club level have a 1hbh as their weapon? Less than 1%. Just work on those low balls and you'll be fine. Especially if your a natural at it, just stick with it
These are the kind of posts that disappoint me a little bit. Bungalo Bill and many others have stated time and again that the one handed backhand is actually a very simple stroke if it's executed properly. The only reason that it seems so complicated for most players is because they create unnecessary complications themselves by using big loopy back swings. By taking the racquet back mostly with the coiling of the body (rather than the arm) and learning the proper footwork and weight transfer a player can develop a solid one hander just as easily as they could with a two hander.

To the OP, if you really are a natural two hander, then by all means go for it. But don't do what many players do and take the easy way out by saying that the one hander is too difficult to learn. Tell me, does this look like a complicated stroke to you?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KTyyITw-fyo

Tomek_tennis
01-27-2009, 02:05 AM
Learn proper gripb (right hand continental, left hand eastern or semi-western for a righty). Then take your backswing, drop your right (if you are a righty) hand and hit a lefthanded forehand. Your left hand should stay in the upper part of the grip. Play just like your FH, but with a lower take back. You can do this exercises on a wall. If you become consistent with it, you should be good... This exercises should be done a lot with a progression (spin, depth, consistency, power etc.)

Aggro
01-27-2009, 07:11 AM
Hey Zeratul - i was in your position about 4 months ago. I had a one handed backhand and at my club it was a real weapon, i would choose more often than not to have bakhand rallies during the match because i could get so many free points off it.

Enter university tennis ! or college tennis for the U.S.A. My backhand couldn't keep up, the power in matches from people with the 2HBH i really couldn't compete. Im not a small guy im 20 years old, 6'2 and 185lbs but there was no way i could match these guys from the back of the court.

So i decided myself to switch to a 2 HBH, ironically my coach when i was 14 said i should stick with the 2H cos i was naturally good at it and it was a stronger shot, i did learn the 2H but changed to a 1H couple of years later.

Anyway, the transition was quite tricky and even in matches now when hitting a running backhand i still hit with a 1 hander down the line or my little angle shot just because its a natural reaction.

A good coaching tip that i found was to play a game in the service boxes and just do little touches but play left handed forehands with your hand in the grip you would hit the back hand in (SW hopefully). This really helped get my timing and swing right.

Then all i can say is practice, practice and practice - nice slow rallies focus on where your hitting it on your racquet and in front of your body and it will eventually just click.

for the low shots, either bend down with your knees and brush the ball or as other people have suggested slice it.

Hope this helps

Ballinbob
01-27-2009, 02:23 PM
These are the kind of posts that disappoint me a little bit. Bungalo Bill and many others have stated time and again that the one handed backhand is actually a very simple stroke if it's executed properly. The only reason that it seems so complicated for most players is because they create unnecessary complications themselves by using big loopy back swings. By taking the racquet back mostly with the coiling of the body (rather than the arm) and learning the proper footwork and weight transfer a player can develop a solid one hander just as easily as they could with a two hander.

To the OP, if you really are a natural two hander, then by all means go for it. But don't do what many players do and take the easy way out by saying that the one hander is too difficult to learn. Tell me, does this look like a complicated stroke to you?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KTyyITw-fyo

Djok, I took a couple lessons for my backhand and I finally understand the smile pattern now. I can slow balls with it it with the proper technique, I just need to keep practicing until I can use it in a match. After a year and a half with this backhand I finally understand it.

I still stand by what I said though...If I could hit a 2hbh I definitley wouldnt have bothered with a 1hbh. A 2hbh is more stable and can return serve 100X more better as well as handle high balls. Plus you can hit it a little late and not have the ball go flying on you.

We 1hbh-ers are able to handle low balls, which is pretty useless considering how many people hit with heavy topspin these days with the western grips. As for the 1hbh being a versatile stroke, i honestly don't see how. A 2hbh is just as versatile if not more because it can handle a bigger variety of shots. The only advantage I have over 2hbh players is my better slice, but the only reason I'm able to hit the slice well is because my 1hbh sucked for the longest time. I used your advice for the slice and I saw immediate improvement btw

So that leaves power as the only real advantage that the 1hbh has over the 2hbh. I'll admit, its really nice to be able hit a strong shot without really trying. Power and maybe reach are the only notable advantages I can see, and when your 6"1 and have a long reach already, the 1hbh doesnt really make much of a difference.

Oh well lol, I'm stuck with the 1hbh. Its gotten alot better at least though, just need to practice:)

Djokovicfan4life
01-27-2009, 02:39 PM
Djok, I took a couple lessons for my backhand and I finally understand the smile pattern now. I can slow balls with it it with the proper technique, I just need to keep practicing until I can use it in a match. After a year and a half with this backhand I finally understand it.

I still stand by what I said though...If I could hit a 2hbh I definitley wouldnt have bothered with a 1hbh. A 2hbh is more stable and can return serve 100X more better as well as handle high balls. Plus you can hit it a little late and not have the ball go flying on you.

Yes, the return of serve is one of the major weaknesses of the one hander. But honestly, at our level of play, just how often are we going to be smacking clean winners on our serve returns? Work on your block return on first serves and then try to take slightly bigger cuts on second serves.

We 1hbh-ers are able to handle low balls, which is pretty useless considering how many people hit with heavy topspin these days with the western grips.

Again, you're referring to a level of tennis far beyond the 3.5 level. I certainly don't see very many 3.5s hitting really heavy balls with consistency and depth. If they could they wouldn't be 3.5s, after all.

As for the 1hbh being a versatile stroke, i honestly don't see how. A 2hbh is just as versatile if not more because it can handle a bigger variety of shots. The only advantage I have over 2hbh players is my better slice, but the only reason I'm able to hit the slice well is because my 1hbh sucked for the longest time. I used your advice for the slice and I saw immediate improvement btw

Excellent! Post a video if possible so that we can spot the improvements. It's amazing what a few simple tips can do for one's game sometimes.

So that leaves power as the only real advantage that the 1hbh has over the 2hbh. I'll admit, its really nice to be able hit a strong shot without really trying. Power and maybe reach are the only notable advantages I can see, and when your 6"1 and have a long reach already, the 1hbh doesnt really make much of a difference.

I think that the added reach is a much bigger advantage then you think it is. We can't all be Novak Djokovic, after all.

Oh well lol, I'm stuck with the 1hbh. Its gotten alot better at least though, just need to practice:)

Just keep practicing that backhand of yours. If you try to switch now you'll probably just end up frustrated with the two hander as well and lose the progress you've made with one hand in the process. I'd take a mediocre backhand that's slowly improving over no backhand any day.

zeratul90
01-27-2009, 03:06 PM
Thanks for the constructive post guys! If there's anything else, please feel free to add on!

Ballinbob
01-27-2009, 03:08 PM
Just keep practicing that backhand of yours. If you try to switch now you'll probably just end up frustrated with the two hander as well and lose the progress you've made with one hand in the process. I'd take a mediocre backhand that's slowly improving over no backhand any day.

Lol I don't intend to switch, for like you said i'm going to end up frustrated like I was with the 1hbh. It's improving, so I'll get there. And it's about time I make another vid, so hopefully I can get one up this weekend. I plan on hitting with alot of people this weekend, so I should be able to.

Anyway, back on topic. What does it matter if I'm talking about above the 3.5 level? To be honest, the only thing holding me back from being a 4.0 is my backhand ..

At the higher levels, high balls are going to kick my ars big time, as well as the serve return. I just don't have the hand eye coordination to take the ball early on a high ball, so I'll be forced to sacrifice court positioning. And who said I want to smack clean winners with a 1hbh return? It's so much harder to just get the ball back in play with a 1hbh. I slice/chip all my returns off that side and as a result everyone S&V's and just kill me.

Look at the pros for example. There's maybe 3 pros who I can think off who have a good serve return off the backhand side. It's just a difficult shot. Also, how many 4.0-4.5 players have their 1hbh as their best shot? Not many at all.

I like the 1hbh alot, and I really enjoy the power it gives, but overall I think a 2hbh is better overall. Both have their advantages, but I think the serve return+ability to handle high balls is a HUGE advantage over the 1hbh.

Djokovicfan4life
01-27-2009, 03:37 PM
Lol I don't intend to switch, for like you said i'm going to end up frustrated like I was with the 1hbh. It's improving, so I'll get there. And it's about time I make another vid, so hopefully I can get one up this weekend. I plan on hitting with alot of people this weekend, so I should be able to.

Anyway, back on topic. What does it matter if I'm talking about above the 3.5 level? To be honest, the only thing holding me back from being a 4.0 is my backhand ..

At the higher levels, high balls are going to kick my ars big time, as well as the serve return. I just don't have the hand eye coordination to take the ball early on a high ball, so I'll be forced to sacrifice court positioning. And who said I want to smack clean winners with a 1hbh return? It's so much harder to just get the ball back in play with a 1hbh. I slice/chip all my returns off that side and as a result everyone S&V's and just kill me.

Look at the pros for example. There's maybe 3 pros who I can think off who have a good serve return off the backhand side. It's just a difficult shot. Also, how many 4.0-4.5 players have their 1hbh as their best shot? Not many at all.

I like the 1hbh alot, and I really enjoy the power it gives, but overall I think a 2hbh is better overall. Both have their advantages, but I think the serve return+ability to handle high balls is a HUGE advantage over the 1hbh.

So the guys you play against hit very heavy balls from the baseline, yet can still serve and volley at will? They don't sound like 3.5-4.0 level players to me. You also said that you are unable to take these balls on the rise, but to improve past your current level you should work on this, no? I don't think that a 5.0 player would say something like "oh no, I hope he doesn't hit high balls to my backhand, because I can't take them on the rise".

Gasquet, Kohlschreiber, Wawrinka, Federer, Blake, and Robredo all come to mind right off the top of my head when I think of solid one handed returners in the singles game. Not to mention all the great serve returners in doubles right now. Both the Bryan brothers, Nenad Zimonic, Kevin Ullyett, Mark Knowles, Mahesh Bhupathi, Wesley Moodie, shall I go on?

Ballinbob
01-27-2009, 03:57 PM
So the guys you play against hit very heavy balls from the baseline, yet can still serve and volley at will? They don't sound like 3.5-4.0 level players to me. You also said that you are unable to take these balls on the rise, but to improve past your current level you should work on this, no? I don't think that a 5.0 player would say something like "oh no, I hope he doesn't hit high balls to my backhand, because I can't take them on the rise".

Gasquet, Kohlschreiber, Wawrinka, Federer, Blake, and Robredo all come to mind right off the top of my head when I think of solid one handed returners in the singles game. Not to mention all the great serve returners in doubles right now. Both the Bryan brothers, Nenad Zimonic, Kevin Ullyett, Mark Knowles, Mahesh Bhupathi, Wesley Moodie, shall I go on?

I said "at the higher levels", high balls will start killing me. No, people my level can't hit heavy deep shots. Maybe off one wing, but definitely not both. And it really doesn't take much to put away a sitter of a return. None of the people I play have great volley skills, but my 1hbh return is a joke.

Also, most 5.0's dont have their 1hbh as their weapon. For most its a weaker shot, and they use other strengths to cover up for it. I wouldn't be surprised if a 5.0 couldnt hit a backhand on the rise that well, for I'm sure he has a killer serve or something else to make up for it

Hitting a 1hbh on the rise requires some excellent timing. That's one more thing a player with a 1hbh has to work on that a 2hbh player doesnt:hand eye coordination/timing. A 2hbh is much more forgiving in terms of timing

What does a 2hbh player need to work on to make up for its weaknesses? Lack of power and lack of reach? You would rather have more power+larger reach than a good backhand serve return and able to crush those high balls back? Today's game is heavily based on topspin, and you will get alot more high balls than low.

And I wouldn't consider Blake+Robredo as having good backhands. Just my opinion though. Blake has a great backhand for teaching, but I dont think its very effective

I'm not really trying to diss the 1hbh (I use it after all lol), but just stating my opinion

Djokovicfan4life
01-27-2009, 04:02 PM
I said "at the higher levels", high balls will start killing me. No, people my level can't hit heavy deep shots. Maybe off one wing, but definitely not both. And it really doesn't take much to put away a sitter of a return. None of the people I play have great volley skills, but my 1hbh return is a joke.

Also, most 5.0's dont have their 1hbh as their weapon. For most its a weaker shot, and they use other strengths to cover up for it. I wouldn't be surprised if a 5.0 couldnt hit a backhand on the rise that well, for I'm sure he has a killer serve or something else to make up for it

Hitting a 1hbh on the rise requires some excellent timing. That's one more thing a player with a 1hbh has to work on that a 2hbh player doesnt:hand eye coordination/timing. A 2hbh is much more forgiving in terms of timing

What does a 2hbh player need to work on to make up for its weaknesses? Lack of power and lack of reach? You would rather have more power+larger reach than a good backhand serve return and able to crush those high balls back? Today's game is heavily based on topspin, and you will get alot more high balls than low.

And I wouldn't consider Blake+Robredo as having good backhands. Just my opinion though. Blake has a great backhand for teaching, but I dont think its very effective

I'm not really trying to diss the 1hbh (I use it after all lol), but just stating my opinion

Blake's backhand in itself is excellent. It's his head that gets him into trouble. He goes for ridiculous down the line winners at the wrong times, resulting in lots of unforced errors. But his backhand is not to blame for that, it's his shot selection that is the real problem.

Robredo may not have a flashy game, but his backhand is rock solid from the baseline and breaks down very rarely in the long rallies.

Also, you seem to have this idea that the two handed backhand automatically makes every shot easier to time. Yes, it does tend to be true for most players, but it's not like you can just try it out one day and just start half volleying from the baseline, Agassi style. Both backhands require lots of practice to get the proper timing down.

Ballinbob
01-27-2009, 04:10 PM
I honestly haven't seen enough of Robredo to judge him, so I take that back. And agreed that Blake needs to get rid of the go for broke style of play. Its hard to tell sometimes if his backhand breaks down or if its shot selection. Its an error either way, so you don't really know.

and lol, you just said timing is easier for most players with a 2hbh, so my idea isn't off. No we cant hit ridiculous shots like you described, but the easier timing is a big plus to me.

your statement here doesn't really make sense. "Yes for most players timing is easier"......"Both backhands require alot of practice to get the timing down". A 2hbh is not as hard to time, period. I'm not sure how you can possibly argue about that

And don't forget the other big advantages of a 2hbh:serve return+easy high balls.

Wow lol, I'm really biased towards the 2hbh. I just noticed that

junbumkim
01-27-2009, 09:55 PM
After 8~10 years of 1 hander, I am switching to 2 hander. I have never taken a lesson on 2 hander, yet I can still hit it reasonably well.

I mostly slice, and I just don't have confidence to hit aggressively with 1 hander during a match.

Common misconception is that 2 hander is great for handling high balls. To an extent it is, probably upto chest high balls. But I have seen a lot of two handers who have a lot of trouble handling anything above their shouler, and they end up hitting into the net or short balls. This is particularly true around 4.0 level.

snr
01-28-2009, 04:51 AM
Low balls slice or you can always flick it up after you get more used to the 2hbh. The best way would still be to take it as easy as possible.

Still though, I don't like the idea that your coach wants to change your backhand just because it is "easier and quicker" to learn.

My coach asked me what I used.. and worked with it. Personally, he uses a 1hbh, and said that while serves were going to be easier to return with 2hbh's well at the beginning, but reinforced that it was more of preference and style of play that should dictate what backhand one uses.

If you really like the 1hbh , just talk to your coach about it.