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View Full Version : What affect would pulling the crosses first have?


marcb
01-22-2009, 12:52 PM
I'm posting to request the advice from an experienced stringer. I have a couple of Vantage 90's with a gut(main) x poly(cross) hybrid setup. I took them to a different stringer than my regular and here is what happened.

I was changing to a new poly and took both frames in with the string jobs intact. I supplied my own string sets but the gut got misplaced sometime between the counter person and the stringer. The stringer seeing only one set of poly assumed that I wanted to keep the existing gut mains and only replace the poly crosses. I founds this out because he called me to say that he snapped the gut on one frame while pulling the crosses. After a while we figured out that the broken string was the original and that the new gut had gone missing. He was able to retrieve it and string both frames.

If he was pulling the poly crosses when the original string broke, I am guessing that the new gut mains got pulled afterward (unless he started over). My question is this. What would be the overall affect on the job? Tension loss or gain over a correct job? Any other factors?

My reason for asking is that the two frames are matched and always play exactly the same if strung at the same time. On this go, one of them has more pop and/or the ball tends to fly on me. I just don't know which one got the pull order wrong. So in order to evaluate the performance of the new poly, I need to know which one is strung correctly.

I intend to ask him the next time but I would sure like to have some neutral input. I don't think I'll ask for a free restring because it really wasn't his fault. However, if there is some existing acknowledged fact about what affect this would have, I may ask the store for a discount or something because I now have to get them both done again if I want a matched set.

Thanks for you help!

Bud
01-22-2009, 01:20 PM
I'm posting to request the advice from an experienced stringer. I have a couple of Vantage 90's with a gut(main) x poly(cross) hybrid setup. I took them to a different stringer than my regular and here is what happened.

I was changing to a new poly and took both frames in with the string jobs intact. I supplied my own string sets but the gut got misplaced sometime between the counter person and the stringer. The stringer seeing only one set of poly assumed that I wanted to keep the existing gut mains and only replace the poly crosses. I founds this out because he called me to say that he snapped the gut on one frame while pulling the crosses. After a while we figured out that the broken string was the original and that the new gut had gone missing. He was able to retrieve it and string both frames.

If he was pulling the poly crosses when the original string broke, I am guessing that the new gut mains got pulled afterward (unless he started over). My question is this. What would be the overall affect on the job? Tension loss or gain over a correct job? Any other factors?

My reason for asking is that the two frames are matched and always play exactly the same if strung at the same time. On this go, one of them has more pop and/or the ball tends to fly on me. I just don't know which one got the pull order wrong. So in order to evaluate the performance of the new poly, I need to know which one is strung correctly.

I intend to ask him the next time but I would sure like to have some neutral input. I don't think I'll ask for a free restring because it really wasn't his fault. However, if there is some existing acknowledged fact about what affect this would have, I may ask the store for a discount or something because I now have to get them both done again if I want a matched set.

Thanks for you help!

This is exactly why you want to learn to string your own racquets. There is too much left to chance when someone else strings your frames. They will never care about the outcome as much as you will.

As for your scenario, he probably snapped the existing gut because he was too lazy to fan the crosses while pulling them. Also, it would be very unusual for a customer to request a half string job on a racquet. That's an odd assumption on his part. I'm thinking the whole ordeal had something to do with the gut that mysteriously disappeared after you dropped it off.

Does your stringer have a (quality) tool to test the stringbed stiffness? If they were strung at the same time and played with equally... the stringbed stiffness should be similar. If they aren't similar, ask him why.

The bottom line is there's really nothing you can do at this point. Some stringers are like shyster auto mechanics or corrupt jewelers. I've heard many stories about string being swapped out with a cheaper substitute because it mysteriously broke during the stringing process. Do yourself a favor and learn to string yourself or change your stringer. Something about all of his convenient explanations sounds fishy, IMO.

marcb
01-22-2009, 01:32 PM
Thanks for the reply. I agree, I should make the investment to string myself. I just can't get the following equation equation to balance right: (extra time spent on tennis stuff) * (money spent on stringing) / (cost of divorce attorney) + (child support for 16 years) = x ; )

I actually think this was an honest mistake though. The shop is associated with a facility where I go to workouts twice a week and play for their league team. I thought a half job was really weird too but I live in a part of the country known for its extreme thriftiness. The original gut probably broke because it was ready to give anyway. It had several weeks use and in the mains against the poly it didn't have a decent life expectancy.

Assuming no evil (intended or otherwise), what is your opinion on the affect of reversing the pull order? I'm mainly tying to figure out if I like the new poly better than the old and if it's got too much pop, I'm going back.

Thanks again.

Fay
01-22-2009, 01:38 PM
I have a master stringer in Phoenix who has done my racquets and I was also lucky enough to find a previously 5.0 player to string my racquets and they are very close in how they string. Other people have done a different job.
If you don't have time and money to string yourself find a master stringer that you like and see how that goes.

I had my horse's feet trimmed very badly and I asked the guy to trim free next time and straighten out the mess. He refused and I got someone else.

Bud
01-22-2009, 01:47 PM
Thanks for the reply. I agree, I should make the investment to string myself. I just can't get the following equation equation to balance right: (extra time spent on tennis stuff) * (money spent on stringing) / (cost of divorce attorney) + (child support for 16 years) = x ; )

I actually think this was an honest mistake though. The shop is associated with a facility where I go to workouts twice a week and play for their league team. I thought a half job was really weird too but I live in a part of the country known for its extreme thriftiness. The original gut probably broke because it was ready to give anyway. It had several weeks use and in the mains against the poly it didn't have a decent life expectancy.

Assuming no evil (intended or otherwise), what is your opinion on the affect of reversing the pull order? I'm mainly tying to figure out if I like the new poly better than the old and if it's got too much pop, I'm going back.

Thanks again.

Reversing the pull order? You mean he broke the mains and then finished the crosses... then pulled out the broken mains, weaved the new mains through the finished and tensioned crosses... and then tensioned the new mains? :shock:

That's a definite no-no (not to mention it's very difficult since you have no anchor main string and your tie-off points may be messed up). It can break your frame fairly easily by pulling the head into a long oval shape (supports are on the inside of the frame to keep the frame from compressing while stringing the mains - then the crosses balance the tension of the mains). For a 2-piece, the racquet is meant to be strung mains first, crosses second... ALWAYS.

I've never tried stringing the crosses before the mains... even out of curiosity on an old junk frame, so I'm not sure of the many problems that may be encountered when doing so.

marcb
01-22-2009, 02:05 PM
That is precisely my fear. I certainly hope not because I love these frames and the thought of subjecting them to unnecessary stress causes me to shiver. The only alternative I can come up with is that after the old main broke while pulling the new crosses, he undid them, then did the new mains and then the crosses. I have to assume that since he is experienced and came recommended that he would not take a risk of damaging the frame.

Either way, I am aware that the mains get pulled first for a reason (well, probably more than one). I'm just curious to know what affect this would have other than possibly breaking my racket which did not happen.

firefox
01-22-2009, 02:35 PM
When you cut out the mains, the cross tie-offs would not have string to anchor on, and it would be PITA to untie the cross knots first and re-tie once the mains are redone. The easiest way is to just redo the job. I'm sure that's what your stringer did.

jim e
01-22-2009, 03:20 PM
Check and see if the tie off points are the same on both racquets, and the tie offs are in the proper locations, and you may have a better idea if they were installed correctly.

Blade0324
01-23-2009, 08:51 AM
While I have not ever tried this personally, as Bud mentioned stringing the crosses first and then the mains is a big NO, NO. My thoughts on the effects are this. If your stringer did indeed finish the crosses when the main broke and then string the mains it would have pulled the frame into and Oval making it taller than it should be. Then when the mains were pulled it would pull it back closer to normal shape and thus make that crosses a higher tension. However I would think with would be pretty tough considering you have poly crosses that don't really stretch at all and gut mains that will strecth a good deal. Hard to tell if that happened or not and be sure but it does sound suspicious to me.